GPT disks and 12.1

I’m not currently testing 12.1, but intend to, probably on a GTP (GUID Partition Table)disk using BIOS, my questions relate to this thread GPT and openSUSE

  1. Is anyone running 12.1 on a GTP disk using BIOS, EFI or UEFI ?
  2. Is anyone aware of efforts to improve compatibility with GTP disks in openSUSE 12.1?
  3. Do the install disks include any of the following:elilo, efibootmgr, gdisk, sgdisk**, fixparts **and/or an option to install GRUB2 ?

The intention is to find out weather the current issues with GTP disks are being addressed, and if not to formulate a sensible request.

Hi,

The repositories have gnu-efi and efibootmgr packages so it looks like there may be some support forthcoming. I will attempt an install of 12.1 on my ASRock E350M1 as soon as the release is available for download.

This motherboard has UEFI firmware so an EFI boot using GPT is something I definately want to implement on it. I will report back on how successful my efforts to do this are.

Regards,
Neil Darlow

I’m not currently testing 12.1, but intend to, probably on a GTP (GUID Partition Table)disk using BIOS, my questions relate to this thread GPT and openSUSE

  1. Is anyone running 12.1 on a GTP disk using BIOS, EFI or UEFI ?
  2. Is anyone aware of efforts to improve compatibility with GTP disks in openSUSE 12.1?
  3. Do the install disks include any of the following:elilo, efibootmgr, gdisk, sgdisk**, fixparts **and/or an option to install GRUB2 ?

The intention is to find out weather the current issues with GTP disks are being addressed, and if not to formulate a sensible request.

dvhenry, I presently have a GTP Partitioned external (USB3) 3 TB hard disk using NTFS and it works just fine with openSUSE. There are two problems which are:

  1. The Grub Legacy boot loader we use (including and up to openSUSE 12.1) does not support booting from such a disk.
  2. Few tools in openSUSE allow the partitioning of this disk, but it does work after being partitioned using Windows 7

Here is one pointer on the subject concerning GPT fdisk:

GPT fdisk Tutorial

So, if booting a GPT disk is what you want, you must pick a distro that uses Grub2 like Ubuntu. However properly partitioning the GPT disk takes special tools and might need to be done beforehand of the install required by the Linux distribution.

Now, what do I think the best present solution is? Buy a 120 GB SSD, load openSUSE on that and boot from it. Your pre-formatted GUD disk will work wonderfully with openSUSE 12.1 after you boot from the SSD.

Thank You,

Hi, I am currently in the process of getting my new HTPC set up. I have a UEFI motherboard (ASRock Z68 pro3-m) with a GPT formatted 128GB SSD.

I have installed both opensuse 12.1 (ext4) and Windows 7 x64 (ntfs) and they both boot without any issues (at least now they do). It’s been a bit of a learning process and I think I must have installed windows about 10 times and opensuse about 5. This is not really down to problems with the installation not working but more down to my initial lack of understanding of what GPT is and how things are booted. At first I had no clue it even existed so when I created my 4 primary partitions with a gparted boot cd before installing Windows, I was very surprised when Windows created a fifth and sixth primary partition to put the ESP and it’s own rescue system in. (Classic WTF moment).

Anyway, at first I tried to install opensuse 11.4 and ran into the issues with elilo missing, so I decided do download 12.1 to see if that worked, and it worked flawlessly. I don’t think it offered an option for using GRUB2 though but I could have just missed it. At the moment I have to use the UEFI boot selection to choose which OS to boot. I’m not sure whether this is correct as I’m still experimenting.

Actually, you have taken the only intelligent option to get openSUSE to work with UEFI, which uses Grub Legacy to boot and in fact, many companies are now touting this as a way to deal with both new OS booting, such as with Windows 8 and older boot managers, such as the old grub openSUSE uses. The present Linux kernel works great with UEFI disks, but boot managers and disk partition utilities are lagging way behind at the moment. For anyone that does not know what UEFI stands for, it is Unified Extensible Firmware Interface and so very well done KuleRucket and thanks for letting us know of your success.

Thank You,

Well bad news I’m afraid. I had an issue with my CMOS battery and the BIOS (or whatever it’s called now) got reset. When this happened all of the boot entries disappeared, even though a boot from a rescue DVD shows all partitions in tact and no issues with the ESP partition. Windows rescue DVD wouldn’t even acknowledge that it had previously installed Windows and refused to do anything. Tools in the opensuse rescue disk are limited at the moment.

In the end I was forced to switch back to MBR. It was fun to try this new stuff out, but it’s not ready for a system I want to ‘just work’ yet.

K.

KuleRucket it is a shame to hear of your problem. In the end, you have went with a reasonable approach that is sustainable in a booting environment. I agree that this is not yet ready for prime time, but a day of judgment is looming in the future and everyone will need to start working on support, post haste. Please let us know if this situation should change.

Thank You,