External NTFS USB drive not accessible by Windows

I’ve been using it for a couple of years, it has been mounted various ways and into various places, for the past year under Suse 11.2

Suddenly I discover that it’s not accessible in Windows anymore. Drive gets an assigned letter but can’t be opened. Tried on Windows 7 and Windows Xp.

This is the current fstab line:

/dev/disk/by-id/usb-Seagate_FreeAgentDesktop_3QK0A0N7-0:0-part1 /home/stan/Seagate ntfs-3g defaults,locale=en_US.UTF-8 0 0

Drive is owned by the root but permissions are set for everybody.

This is ls -l line for it’s mount point

drwxrwxrwx 1 root root 8192 2010-07-16 21:48 Seagate

Another weird thing about it is that if I try to copy a folder into it Dolphin gives me “can’t create directory” error and then hangs. If I restart Dolpin I see that the folder has been created just fine and I can copy anything into this new folder without any problems, including creating any sub-folders.

That weirdness doesn’t exist if I run Dolphin as a superuser.

I would create a separate thread for this issue if there’s no connection.

For now I believe something screwed up the part where Windows reads what file system it is.

Is there a way to “unscrew” it and make sure that NTFS looks ok to Windows, too?

Backing up 750 GB drive and reformatting it is not an option in the near future and I occasionally need to take the drive and plug it into friends’ Windows. Today was embarrassing.

ran chkdisk on windows?
What does windows say? Not formatted? Someting useful?

Also, open a terminal on linux and see if there is an fsck command for ntfs (I don’t think there will be, and I’d use windows own one in preference anyway).
It’d probably be called fsck.ntfs

Oh, problem solved.

First attempts at “chkdsk f:” gave “Warning! F parameter not specified”, then "deleting corrupt attribute record (code 128) from file record segment 19974, then a few more like that, then chkdsk exits: “Errors found, cannot continue in read only mode”.

Then I read about “/f” switch that should try and repair the system without scanning the drive first, so it became “chkdsk f:/f” and it went away merrily deleting a couple of hundred “index entries”, then recovered a couple of dozen orphan files, then, and that’s what I think mattered most, it corrected errors in Master File Table bitmap.

Now the drive is working under Windows.

Will reboot to Suse and post again.

Works fine in Suse, too.

Even the “cannot create directory” errors have gone away, afaict.

Tried ntfsfix and got this:

ntfsfix /dev/sdc

Mounting volume… Failed to startup volume : Invalid argument
FAILED
Attempting to correct errors… FAILED
Failed to startup volume : Invalid argument
Volume is corrupt. You should run chkdsk.

Don’t know if I should, everything seems to be working, apart from ntfsfix.

If windows thinks its ok (and it is window’s filesystem!), and suse can use it with no problems, I don’t think you should try and ‘fix’ it anymore. chkdisk won’t hurt it though
If you’re worried about it, you can check that the disc is OK (as in bad sectors etc) by using tools generally available from the disc manufacturer (they usually run only in windows).

ntfsfix --help (or man ntfsfix) might be a good bet, the first line is saying that you haven’t given ntfsfix the right arguments.

On 2010-08-11 14:36, Stan Ice wrote:
>
> I’ve been using it for a couple of years, it has been mounted various
> ways and into various places, for the past year under Suse 11.2
>
> Suddenly I discover that it’s not accessible in Windows anymore. Drive
> gets an assigned letter but can’t be opened. Tried on Windows 7 and
> Windows Xp.

I assume you have to repair it in windows. Filesystem check, you know.

I hope it does not destroys any data…


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” GM (Elessar))

I had a similar experience with a Verbatim (Kingston) 16GB USB stick: Formatted (unpartitioned) with Windows 7 64bit. Used with Windows and openSUSE 12.3. At some point (without having had problems) I decided to run the filesystem check via mouse clicking (the way Bill wanted us to work). Check started and run up to visual “98%”, then nothing more did happen (while the “progress illustrating bar” changed colors busily): No disk activity (resource monitor), no CPU activity… So I aborted the check by clicking the button. It worked…(!). After that the stick was unsuable from Windows. It could not be ejected, and Windows shutdown hung until the stick was pulled out. Running the filesystem check in Windows/XP succeeds, but still after that file system check in Windows hangs (like before). I suggest death penalty for programmers that write programs that hang for no obvious reason without any error or progress message being shown! openSUSE could be the culprit, but the filesystem check in Windows 7 seems to be a shame; probably it’s worse than fsck.ext2 in 1991 :wink: