dual boot windows 7 and opensuse 12.2

i have searched and searched everywhere (and I mean everywhere!) on the internet to find a simple, step-by-step, noob-friendly guide to installing opensuse 12.2 alongside win 7 in a dual boot configuration but to no avail. Can anyone help me out please? I am a 99% of the time a win 7 user but I do like to ‘dabble’ in linux. I have never understood why some linux distros mention absolutely nothing on how to install alongside windows; yet ubuntu, linuxmint, fedora, pclinuxos to name but a few make it very easy. This just adds more weight to those who think that linux is just for geeks!

It depends on your setup. Do you have msdos partition table or efi? If not efi, generally it comes down to using the Windows disk utility to resize your main partition, and have Linux automatically use the free space.

I have win 7 x64 installed on my 99gig ‘c’ drive, and a data storage of 158 gig on my ‘d’ drive. This leaves me with 39 gig of unallocated space where i wish to install my opensuse…I have no idea whether I have msdos partition table or efi because i don’t know what that means…i did find this… Dual-Booting Windows and openSUSE which tries to explain how to do it with opensuse 12.1 but the installation menu is different in 12.2…in the ‘tweakhound’ version it tells you to boot from the root partition and not from the master boot record but in 12.2 this isn’t there; instead the options are to boot from the extended partition or the root partition…i don’t know which one to choose

Number one Windows messes with your mind c: and D: are Windows names for partitions not really drives. I assume you have only one “drive” not two or more.
If the space is unallocated then the installer should see this and use that space without any aid from you. But!!! You should always double check when shown the proposed changes to the partitioning and do not accept it unless it is what you really intended. By default the installer will create a swap of about 2x your memory and a root partition of 15-20 gig depending on space available the rest will be in a home partition. Since this with you exiting partitions is more then the max of 4 primary partitions allowed an extended partition will be needed that will contain the 3 new partitions as logical partitions. All this should be automatic but I want you to know what to expect.

On 2012-09-10 22:06, montee wrote:
>
> i have searched and searched everywhere (and I mean everywhere!) on the
> internet to find a simple, step-by-step, noob-friendly guide to
> installing opensuse 12.2 alongside win 7 in a dual boot configuration
> but to no avail.

You can not expect a guide for 12.2 this early when almost nobody has tried it. Use guides for 12.1
or earlier and change whatever needs to be changed. :slight_smile:

> This just adds more weight to those who think
> that linux is just for geeks!

Well, partitioning is for geeks. Either you know what it is about, or you trust the installer to do
a good job - and I don’t.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

^^ Good advice. If you still have trouble, come back to us with more details of your issue

openSUSE 12.2 now uses Grub 2 and as such will be like Ubuntu I would guess when working with Windows. The real question is where do you have space enough to install openSUSE? When you install openSUSE onto the same hard drive as Windows, booting must then be controlled by openSUSE and its grub 2 boot loader. How many hard drives do you have? Installing openSUSE on a secondary or external hard drive can be done and use your computer BIOS to select the boot drive and thus leaving your Windows hard drive alone. I prefer loading openSUSE on a second hard drive and let Windows have its own hard drive. But what ever you decide to do, you have got to have room for it some where. How much, well its my advice to get 40 GB free if you can of unformatted and blank disk space. openSUSE will not load onto a NTFS/FAT partition and in general should be allowed to create its own partitions on a Windows system. You can start of the task of getting more room in Windows by removing anything you do not need, running all of its disk utilities to clean out all temp files and to defrag the hard disk. Then use the Windows disk manager to reduce its disk partition size. openSUSE can also reduce the disk size and often by more, but only because Windows is not running when it is done. Then, with free space in hand, openSUSE will propose how to use that space to load its software and boot loader. Always, make sure your critical data is backed up in Windows first. Realize that some Windows functions like loading a service pack may not work when Windows and openSUSE are located on the same hard disk. If anything goes wrong and you don’t have a separate copy of Windows and your data backed up, openSUSE can not help in getting it back. Be for warned, ask as many questions as you like and good luck in what ever you decide to do. Also, if you have the right version of Windows, you can use Windows Hyper-V to load openSUSE into a Virtual Session, so check out Windows Hyper-V as another solution to run Linux.

Thank You,

I am also trying to setup a dual boot of Win 7 and openSUSE 12.2 following the Tweakhound article mentioned above. This procedure works fine for 12.1 and earlier with GRUB legacy, but like the OP says, the 12.2 installer is different. Thus far I can’t get a dual boot set up to work with 12.2 using the Win 7 boot loader. I would prefer to use the latter as Windows can sometimes blow GRUB away with upgrades, etc. I’ve had no problem dual booting other distros that use GRUB 2 like Mint 13, which I just wiped out with 12.2.

As for my install, I have an extended partition, with a 200 MB partition (sda5) for /boot. I have another 100 GB LVM partition with logical volumes for /, /home, etc. During install, I set GRUB 2 to be installed into /boot (sda5). After install, I booted into Win 7 and then added an entry for 12.2 to the Win 7 boot loader using EasyBCD. When I reboot and select 12.2 from the Win 7 boot menu, I get the GRUB minimal bash shell prompt (or something to that effect). So it seems like GRUB is found, but then GRUB has a problem loading 12.2. I’m not an expert on GRUB or boot loaders in general. Anybody have any ideas on how to fix this? If it works on other distros, then it should work with 12.2. I am not opposed to reinstalling if necessary.

First you are in a way right. You have to be a little geeky to get Linux to work properly. but it is fun and there is nothing wrong in being geeky!
Secondly, I Think you guys are making this more complicated than what it really is. This is what I did (And have done it many times now) and it works.

  1. find a program to edit you windows partitions. (what program? you have to find it on your own)
  2. reduce your partitions and have some un allocated space. If you already had created the 3 different partitions that Linux uses, I suggest you delete them and create just one big partition to make things easier.
  3. create a partition in the un allocated space (it does not matter what kind of formatting you give it)
  4. start opensuse installer and when you get to the part where it shows you the suggested partitions you click on create partition setup
  5. it will show you the disks available on your machine. select the disk where you want to install opensuse.
  6. the next screen will ask you to select the partition or the entire disk. If you are sharing the disk with windows 7, select ONLY the empty partition that was recently created. If you are using a second disk, you can select to use the entire disk (make sure you are in the correct disk).
  7. click next, accept, ok, install or what ever is needed to proceed to install, but make sure you know what disk or partition you are selecting.

The opensuse installer will delete the selected partition and create the new partition table as necessary. You do not need to do this manually. It will also create all the necessary entries in Grub2 so you can choose what OS to use.

It is quite simple.

Disclaimer: in some rare cases (I have not been able to identify when) you need to tweak Grub2 to boot windows 7. but that is very easy.

Try it and let us know if it works. :slight_smile:

I was once and for a number of years a dedicated SUSE user. Since EOL of 11.1, I’ve been drifting around from one distro to another, never finding the all-round comfort I had with 1^3. So I thought I’d try out 12.2 for old times sake. Sad to say, SUSE always a sharp dresser, but still has some trouble ambulating about in those stiletto heals. I’ll use this dual booting problem as an example.

Dual booting is essential to your average Linux user. Except in cubicle land you just can’t do it all in either Linux or M$. And it seems everyone (except M$ and now SUSE agrees) M$ well because they’re are M$ but SUSE – what happened here ? I distinctly remember as recently as 11.4 there was no problem dual booting. But now it’s an issue.

SUSE that was installed from the DVD next to “7” will start fine but “7” will be inaccessible. If you go with the SUSELive CD you will not even get past the “create partitions” before being bashed with a “Calling YaST module inst_… has failed. This is most likely a bug…” message if you proceed at once to “Installation”. Only if you wait for “Installation” that you get from “OpenSUSE KDE Live” do you finally get a working dual boot configuration.

I have gone through Debian, Mint, Fedora, Ubuntu, Slack and for all their other issues at least dual booting is one thing that works.

I was once and for a number of years a dedicated SUSE user. Since EOL of 11.1, I’ve been drifting around from one distro to another, never finding the all-round comfort I had with 1^3. So I thought I’d try out 12.2 for old times sake. Sad to say, SUSE always a sharp dresser, but still has some trouble ambulating about in those stiletto heals. I’ll use this dual booting problem as an example.

Dual booting is essential to your average Linux user. Except in cubicle land you just can’t do it all in either Linux or M$. And it seems everyone (except M$ and now SUSE agrees) M$ well because they’re are M$ but SUSE – what happened here ? I distinctly remember as recently as 11.4 there was no problem dual booting. But now it’s an issue.

SUSE that was installed from the DVD next to “7” will start fine but “7” will be inaccessible. If you go with the SUSELive CD you will not even get past the “create partitions” before being bashed with a “Calling YaST module inst_… has failed. This is most likely a bug…” message if you proceed at once to “Installation”. Only if you wait for “Installation” that you get from “OpenSUSE KDE Live” do you finally get a working dual boot configuration.

I have gone through Debian, Mint, Fedora, Ubuntu, Slack and for all their other issues at least dual booting is one thing that works on all of them.

I keep my windows install on a computer whose dual screens sit beside my openSUSE dual screens, making 4 in all, with openSUSE and windows simultaneously linked to the same keyboard and mouse with the app synergy. I wouldn’t dream of dual booting because when I want an app from windows that doesn’t run in wine, I have no need to reboot, it’s right there at the end of a mouse click.

Now, for your problem, there’s not any advice I can give you because you haven’t laid out the actual problem except to say that you really disappointed and it must be a flaw in openSUSE. The tools are at fault, not the technician, a difficulty encountered through past ages.

On 2013-02-22, swerdna <swerdna@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
>
> totalled;2529209 Wrote:
>> I was once and for a number of years a dedicated SUSE user. Since EOL of
>> 11.1, I’ve been drifting around from one distro to another, never
>> finding the all-round comfort I had with 1^3. So I thought I’d try out
>> 12.2 for old times sake. Sad to say, SUSE always a sharp dresser, but
>> still has some trouble ambulating about in those stiletto heals. I’ll
>> use this dual booting problem as an example.
<SNIP>
> Now, for your problem, there’s not any advice I can give you because
> you haven’t laid out the actual problem except to say that you really
> disappointed and it must be a flaw in openSUSE.

Wrong subforum IMO. He’s illustrating his dual booting problem as an example' of his misgivings with SUSE’ 12.2 (@OP:
it’s openSUSE btw). I believe the post is better directed towards Soapbox.

Hmm, it read more like a CV :D. However it does say there was an issue with the DVD installer, and a bug with liveCD installer, but no direct request for help. Not a very strong opinion expressed as for Soapbox. Just chit-chat perhaps, to have discussion about the old days.

PS. The forum is already littered with advice and threads on dual-booting.

On 2013-02-22, consused <consused@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
> Hmm, it read more like a CV :D. However it does say there was an issue
> with the DVD installer, and a bug with liveCD installer, but no direct
> request for help. Not a very strong opinion expressed as for Soapbox.
> Just chit-chat perhaps, to have discussion about the old days.

Haha, perhaps you’re right! But I don’t think mutual misposts between chit-chat/soapbox will ruffle any feathers. My
understanding is that Install/Boot/Login posts (and other troubleshooting posts) are about asking about help or
informing everyone about specific bugs WITH solutions/workarounds.

> PS. The forum is already littered with advice and threads on
> dual-booting.

I’ve noticed a recent substantial increase in the number of posts asking about dual-booting. I wonder whether it would
be a good idea to propose a separate `Dualboot/multiboot’ subforum, that includes stickies that makes such advice more
immediately accessible to aspiring dualbooters, including for Windows users looking to become prospective openSUSE
dabblers.

Indeed, mine too. Some users don’t like asking for help directly, they just imply that a resolution is needed, and hope a volunteer takes the bait.

> PS. The forum is already littered with advice and threads on
> dual-booting.

I’ve noticed a recent substantial increase in the number of posts asking about dual-booting. I wonder whether it would
be a good idea to propose a separate `Dualboot/multiboot’ subforum…

Or encourage the use of the search facility. I honestly don’t believe it’s a broad enough topic to justify its own subforum when compared to the existing topics, and they are significant in number already.

Of course Grub2 should make multi-booting easier <cough, splutter>.

On 2013-02-22 16:06, consused wrote:
> Of course Grub2 should make multi-booting easier <cough, splutter>.

Multibooting is complex, always has been, and grub2 makes it more
difficult because few people here understand it and can help with it. I
can not help, for instance, and I’m not a novice.

There are issues with how to partition correctly, and there are many
ways. One or two disk. Internal or external. Where to place grub. Which
grub.

On top, UEFI. Needed or not. One system in classical mode, another in
uefi mode. Hybrid modes. classical vs GPT partitioning…

BIOS/UEFI config. How to put the computer in the appropriate mode.

/IT IS/ a complex issue.

Right of my head, i don’t know if there is a document that explains it all.

Ah, and I don’t believe that other distros have it easier, though.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

/IT IS/ a complex issue.

Right of my head, i don’t know if there is a document that explains it all.

Ah, and I don’t believe that other distros have it easier, though.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.

Not all have it easier, but some yes they do. Try Linux Mint >12. A relatively small iso for download and for some simple minded users with just a laptop and unavoidable reliance on M$ as the other OS a very smooth installation. Their “looknfeel” leaves a lot off the table and don’t even think of using it with BTRFS but it loads with “7” whether “7” was your own install or the factory GPT type install.
Again, I wish openSUSE was as easy

To clarify the proper path that worked to install 12.2 in a dual-boot context for me was:

Boot from the Suse 12.2 Live KDE Disk.

Once the Suse Live is up start your WiFi or other BB connection

Click on the “Installation” item

When you get to the partitioning section after selecting your time zone select manual (for experts) partitioning option
( This will show you the parts where M$ is already loaded so you do not over-write them )

Create a /boot mounted part with >90MB with an EXT2 filesystem

For simplicity you only need one other part for suse: root or “/” the – file system choice is arbitrary IMO

Afterwords, you will create your account and the root account and that’s it

Again this is for other linux users who are kind of lost in the Grub2 woods

You do not need a separate /boot partition except for special needs.

You will need the amount of space you intend for openSUSE non partitioned on the disk. So in general you will need to shrink the existing Windows partition(s) to leave the space to install. This is most safely done from Windows though the installer will do it also.

Recommended partitions are swap (1-2X memory), root (also known as / set at 10-20+ gig depending on needs) the rest in home (/home) that is where personal data and files go.

Note that if you have a UEFI BIOS or GPT partitioning you should come back for more info. These are relatively new and additional instructions may be needed

There is no single right way to partition or install. Linux is very configurable so you can make it fight your needs not fit you needs to the OS like other OS’s