dual boot 11.4 RC1 with 11.3

Hi, I want to install 11.4 RC1 into a spare partition on a machine that has 11.3 up and running. When I get to the boot menu, how should I install grub?

On my older test machine I have 11.1 and 11.2 installed, and when I installed 11.4 it gave me the option to put it in MBR, / (root) or not at all. I selected MBR, and that resulted in a chained boot loader, so that when I select the an older OS from the menu, it then displays another grub menu that looks like the original pre-11.4 menu.

On my production machine, I have 11.3 installed and want to put 11.4 rc1 into a spare partition. I don’t know if the existing OS grub is in the MBR or root (or /boot?). Which should I select when I install the 11.4?

Thanks!

To your last question first, you need to run the program findgrub, a script file here written by pleas_try_again and it is located here:

Looking for Grub and Windows bootloader in all partitions.

Message #69 has the most recent version you should use. Now in the case of what to do with a second version of openSUSE, well you can chain load the grub menus or copy the grub menu.lst entry and move it to your primary menu.lst. It works best if you have more than one hard drive, which is what I have done. I made sure ALL of 11.4 RC1 loads went to hard disk two. I could even let it work by making the second hard drive the boot drive, but instead, I just copied its menu.lst entry over to my first drive and it works like a champ. If you gave us the output of fdisk -l and a copy of your /etc/fstab file, we could make some suggestions along with the findgrub output. You need to tell us how you were going to add in the new openSUSE version. You could share the swap file if its on the same disk, but I used separate / and /home areas for 11.4 RC1 from 11.3.

Thank You,

Have bug in NTFS-3G driver. openSUSE 11.4 not monnt ntfs file system.

Have bug in NTFS-3G driver. openSUSE 11.4 not monnt ntfs file system.
I thought I heard this bug has been reported AND you can go back, use the Partitioner, and add it back in manually. The NTFS-3G driver works just fine in openSUSE 11.4. Further, if you had more than one NTFS partition, you would have noticed, all of the others, after the first, were mounted for you just fine. Only the first one fails for some reason.

Thank You,

How with same NTFS partition openSUSE 11.3 work fine. openSUSE 11.4 RC1 during installation reported not mount partition.

How with same NTFS partition openSUSE 11.3 work fine. openSUSE 11.4 RC1 during installation reported not mount partition.
This is some sort of installation error. The Installer is doing several things at the same time and one task has the Windows drive busy while a second tries to add it to your new fstab file and the result is the error code and the failure to mount the drive. This works after the install because the problem is not with the NTFS-3G driver, but rather the openSUSE 11.4 installer. Now imagine that you just added in a new NTFS drive after you installed openSUSE. You have always been able to run the YaST / System / Partitioner, select the new hard drive partition, select a mount point, give it a name, elect to NOT format it and have it added automatically for you to your fstab file. For the first Windows partition, you must do it manually. If you don’t want to use the partitioner, then do this.

As root, create a folder from root called /Windows. Next, as root, edit the /etc/fstab file and add this new line that says:

/dev/disk/by-id/drive_name_goes_here-part? /Windows             ntfs-3g    defaults 0 0

You can copy and paste it in but you must modify the name “drive_name_goes_here-part?”. If you can not find its name but know the generic name, you can use this entry:

/dev/sda1 /Windows             ntfs-3g    defaults 0 0

Again, the name /dev/sda1 must match the drive/partition and you must be root to create this new folder and to edit the /etc/fstab file. Once done, just reboot and it is added for you. If you want to load Windows from this, just ask how. It takes a couple more manual edit to set this up.

Thank You,

Ok, i will make probe with RC2. Hopefully fix openSUSE 11.4 installer in RC2.

Going back to the original question and the first response by jdmcdaniel3…

I followed your advice. My grub boots from / (root). When I installed RC1 into my spare partition (which is /dev/sda3), I disabled both “boot from MBR” and “boot from /”. After the install, I went back to 11.3 and copied the RC1 images into my original /boot directory, and used Yast to set the menu entry into menu.lst. This works fine and I’m happy with it. The new RC1 appears in my grub menu.

But I’m curious: how I could have added the new RC1 into my existing install without having to manually copy the images and set up menu.lst?

rcbell

Going back to the original question and the first response by jdmcdaniel3…

I followed your advice. My grub boots from / (root). When I installed RC1 into my spare partition (which is /dev/sda3), I disabled both “boot from MBR” and “boot from /”. After the install, I went back to 11.3 and copied the RC1 images into my original /boot directory, and used Yast to set the menu entry into menu.lst. This works fine and I’m happy with it. The new RC1 appears in my grub menu.

But I’m curious: how I could have added the new RC1 into my existing install without having to manually copy the images and set up menu.lst?
rcbell, I don’t think there is an option to add the new install to your old setup (unless you keep a separate /boot partition), but you can get the new install to pick up on your old setup, placing a valid menu.lst entry to run your previous openSUSE version from the new grub menu.lst file. The basic problem is that with any version of openSUSE running, it assumes the main menu is located in /boot/grub/menu.lst. When you update your kernel, this is where the grub menu update will go. This is one reason that some think your best bet is to have each openSUSE version, maintain its own grub boot loader and chainload each one.

Chainload, as in the same kind of entry used to start Windows, can also be used to start each separate copy of grub. This would result in the first grub menu, loading the next one and so forth. By doing it this way, when a kernel update is performed, you will be able to load it as part of your normal menu setup. However, if you maintain a single copy of the grub bootloader (but not in a common /boot partition), it will be up to you to move the new kernel load command from secondary copies of openSUSE grub menu, should you update their kernel, to your common grub menu.lst file. Its kind of a pain, but the latter way is how I have been doing it so far, but its not much trouble to get confused doing this.

Another option might be to maintain a single copy of /boot in a separate partition. If you really like to keep lots of different versions of openSUSE, all using the grub legacy version, then this might be your answer to the mess. Unfortunately, if a single install goes bad, it could blow away your entire menu system. This does happen when using pre-release software. If you maintain a valid backup, and a good LiveCD boot disk, this can always be overcome. The openSUSE installer does not suggest this by default and you must use the expert Partitioner setting to use the single /boot partition. Make sure you DO NOT FORMAT the /boot partition when you mount it, if you select this option, even if the installer should complain.

Thank You,

In openSUSE 11.4 RC2 installer is work fine :slight_smile:

I think you don’t need to copy the images to 11.3, you only need to copy the kernel lines from
11.4 /boot/grub/menu.lst and paste it to your 11.3 /boot/grub/menu.lst.

I think you don’t need to copy the images to 11.3, you only need to copy the kernel lines from
11.4 /boot/grub/menu.lst and paste it to your 11.3 /boot/grub/menu.lst.
If you are not maintaining a single /boot partition you would only copy the entry from the other menu.lst file to combine them. There are a couple of issues however. If the other entry comes from a different hard drive you must consider if the boot order is now different. This changes the device.map file you are booting from as well as to which drive is now HD0? And, if HD0 is different in the device.map file it is also different for the entry in the menu.lst file. Last, when you update your kernel, you will update the menu.lst file in your current /boot/grub folder and not in the actual /boot/grub folder you booted from if it is different copy of openSUSE. Thus requiring a manual edit of the current menu.lst file to the actual menu.lst file you booted from.

Thank You,

Thanks. Good to know, I cant remember now what I did with my 2 hard drives with 2 different version of opensuse. Right now I have one hard drive with opensuse 11.3 with a separate /boot partition. When I installed 11.4 for testing I installed it in one single partition and to boot to the root partition and then just copy the menu.lst and paste it to 11.3.

Run out of edit time
I mean by menu.lst
I copied the 11.4 menu.lst kernel lines and paste to 11.3 menu.lst.

Run out of edit time
I mean by menu.lst
I copied the 11.4 menu.lst kernel lines and paste to 11.3 menu.lst.
I have been doing the same thing with the many openSUSE 11.4 releases by just adding them from their new menu.lst to my original openSUSE 11.3 boot setup. I have two copies of 11.4 and over write the older one on each new release. Right now, when the final 11.4 comes out, I have not decided to do away with openSUSE 11.3, though you only need one usable copy somewhere. The main issue with openSUSE 11.4 to become my main OS will be Firefox 4 as it has issues that do not exist with Firefox 3 in openSUSE 11.3. So, not sure about a total switch over just yet to openSUSE 11.4 until the Firefox thing is settled, perhaps with a final release of the browser which might occur later in March than the release of openSUSE 11.4.

Thank You,