Do I need to be on the same sub-net to be able to print to another PC ?

The PC with the printer is running openSUSE whereas the other 2 are Windows Vista.

thanks

Your title asks about ‘subnets’, while your comment suggests your question about printing may be wider in scope than that. To start with, if the computers are connected via a simple hub or switch, then they should be using the same subnet. However, a router can be employed to provide connectivity between different networks if necessary.

Actually they are different subnets.
One Windows Vista is direct wired to the modem/router, I/P =192.168.1.n

The rest are connected by wireless to another access point, I/P = 10.0.0.n

I am pretty sure it could not be done in Windows but since Linux is better and a lot more flexible, I thought I would see if it was possible.

If you are able to ping to that network from your PC then you could use IPP printing

Thank you nis, and yes, I can ping the other network, which surprised me.
Now it is time to do some reading on IPP printing.

Just type in the browser the following format.

http://ipaddress:631/printers/queue-name

if you are able to see your printer then try to add in the same format in "Devices and Printers"in Windows Vista.

If you have not already done so, you may need to configure both Samba and CUPS and you may need to upload printer driver files for the Windows computers. Much of this can be done with YaST and CUPS.

On 8/18/2013 4:06 PM, john hudson wrote:
>
> If you have not already done so, you may need to configure both Samba
> and CUPS and you may need to upload printer driver files for the Windows
> computers. Much of this can be done with YaST and CUPS.
>
>
hextejas;

These two HowTo’s by swerdna should help. They were written with openSUSE 10.x & 11.x in mind, but should still be valid for 12.x.

Using Samba for printing:
http://swerdna.dyndns.org/susesambaprint_1.html

Using IPP for printing:
http://swerdna.dyndns.org/suseprintipp.html


P.V.
“We’re all in this together, I’m pulling for you” Red Greenb

I’m unable to bring up any of Swerdna’s excellent pages today. It appears that most of his old accounts have been discontinued, and the URLs at swerdna.dyndns.org are being redirected to a message offering a copy of the page, made by Google on Aug 3, but that one won’t load either.

I well remember how helpful those tutorials were when I was learning my way around openSUSE, and I still refer to them from time to time to jog my aging memory. Does anyone know if they’ve been relocated? where?

  1. You need to know how you have your printer setup, including whether you’re using IPP. If IPP, it’s OS agnostic, you configure the client to simply point to the appropriate Print Server (Vista box in your case).

  2. If you’re using IPP to print, you don’t need SAMBA or anything else, just the standard CUPS installed with any openSUSE. SAMBA is required only for Printer Shares using the SMB protocol.

  3. Although it sounds like you have fundamental network connectivity because you say you can PING the Vista box from the openSUSE box (or vice versa), it should be noted that different subnets don’t always have to be physical (on the other side of a router), it’s also possible to configure any number of virtual subnets on the same physical network segment.

TSU

On 8/19/2013 9:36 AM, caprus wrote:
>
> venzkep;2580114 Wrote:
>> These two HowTo’s by swerdna should help…
> I’m unable to bring up any of Swerdna’s excellent pages today. It
> appears that most of his old accounts have been discontinued, and the
> URLs at swerdna.dyndns.org are being redirected to a message offering a
> copy of the page, made by Google on Aug 3, but that one won’t load
> either.
>
> I well remember how helpful those tutorials were when I was learning my
> way around openSUSE, and I still refer to them from time to time to jog
> my aging memory. Does anyone know if they’ve been relocated? where?
>
>
If you are still having problems, try a different DNS server. The addresses I gave are still valid.


P.V.
“We’re all in this together, I’m pulling for you” Red Green

No need to change. The links are working today with no changes made at this end. We’re still using the same DNS server (Google)
Thanx

Edit: Just found this note on Swerdna’s openSUSE home page:

This site closes daily to conserve bandwidth for about 6 hours at about 1000 Z.

Opensuse 12.3
KDE 4.1

The ping seems to be only one way. Let me give you the complete setup.
Windows Vista 192.168.1.103 attached via ethernet cable to ATT modem/router
Linux with printer 10.0.0.2 attached wireless to wireless router is 10.0.0.1 and attached via ethernet cable to ATT modem.

Linux, 10.0.0.2 can ping 192.168.1.103, but not the other way.
192.168.1.103 cannot ping 10.0.0.1

Stumped am I and I will play around again tomorrow.

On 08/20/2013 07:36 PM, hextejas wrote:
>
> Opensuse 12.3
> KDE 4.1
>
> The ping seems to be only one way. Let me give you the complete setup.
> Windows Vista 192.168.1.103 attached via ethernet cable to ATT
> modem/router
> Linux with printer 10.0.0.2 attached wireless to wireless router is
> 10.0.0.1 and attached via ethernet cable to ATT modem.
>
> Linux, 10.0.0.2 can ping 192.168.1.103, but not the other way.
> 192.168.1.103 cannot ping 10.0.0.1
>
> Stumped am I and I will play around again tomorrow.

Your 192.168.1.1 (or whatever the address of the router on the 192.168.1.0/24
network has no rules for routing to 10.0.0.1/24. Unfortunately, your story
doesn’t make it clear to me how the connections are made. Please make a drawing
either in ASCII graphics, or using a drawing program.

I have four different AP/router boxes with only one of them connected to the
cable modem through its WAN port. That one gets its WAN IP from the cable
company, and it is the only one that is a DHCP server. The others are assigned
fixed IP addresses of 192.168.1.2, …1.3, and …1.4. In addition, They are
connected to the main router using one of their LAN ports - the WAN ports of
those are empty. As a result they are Access Points and switches, but not
routers. This way everything attached to the network has an address of
192.168.1.X which is either fixed, or assigned by the master router. This way,
every machine can ping every other one without any need for special routing tables.

I think that this is about to get easier to resolve, since we are switching the Windows Vista box to openSUSE 12.3

YAHOO !!!

One way ping usually means a firewall is blocking(or other type of directional filter).

If on different physical network segments with different subnets, can also mean a missing route entry.

TSU

Try disabling the firewall in Vista.