dhcp client does not receive the dns server address

Hello,

I searched previously through the forum, without finding something related to ty problem:

I have installed a working DNS server on my home network. I have an unique server, devoted to dns, gateway, storage which runs opensuse 11.0 (I known that it is rather old).

Two new clients require DHCP.
I have installed, using yast, a very simple DHCP server, according to the following config:

option domain-name “XXX.XXX”;
option domain-name-servers 192.168.0.1;
option routers 192.168.0.1;
option ntp-servers 192.168.0.1;
default-lease-time 14400;
subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 192.168.0.253 192.168.0.254;
default lease-time 14400;
max-lease-time 172800;
}
(I have tried to add “ddns-update-style none”, and to remove the ntp-servers option, since my server is not a time server, without success).

Unfortunately, even if the client (a mac running OSX 10.4) receives a right IP and gateway address, it displays neither dns server address nor default domain name.

The same mac, on my office network (not managed by me), receives everything.

Thanks for any advice.
Sincerely

Do you have a broadband modem/router on the LAN also? Have you disabled the DHCP server in that? BTW, why so stingy with the range? If you have too few addresses in the pool, you may run out if more than two distinct clients try to get a lease.

Hello,

thanks for your help.
No, I haven’t any external Internet access. Neither wired nor wireless. Strange, isn’t it ?:wink: My children are young, and I want to protect them against bad usage of internet.

I’m very stingy on the range since I leave place for the only two clients that will require dhcp. All my other computers (at home !) have static addresses.

But do you think that can be related to my problem ?

Best regards

Who knows? It doesn’t hurt to have a larger pool. If you really want to pin the clients down to a fixed addresses you can also do that with DHCP, look at the fixed-address directive.

Also you could look in the log files for clues.

If you get desperate you could snoop on the DHCP packets and dump their contents with dhcpdump.

Thanks for your help.
I found this directive, but if I have well understood, this will lead to either managing my whole ip address plan into the DHCP config file, or to duplicate it, on one hand in the dns database, on the other hand in the dhcp config file. If I choose the first way, will I always be able to do reverse DNS ?

I will follow your advice, and look into the log file, and then into the tcp packets.

Best regards

You can use domain names for fixed-address.