Default /home files - How to? / Other questions

Question one.

I decided to stick with openSUSE 12.3 x64, but I’m afraid of having to re-isntall it for some reason. If I ever need to do so, could I re-use the current /home partition without formatting it? Would the current config files conflict with the brand new ones? (driver cfgs and such) Because if it does, I could just copy all default /home content and send it online so if the need to re-install the system appears, all I have to do is copy /home contents again, meaining the /home folder would look (from the system eyes) brand new.

Other than that, I could partitions as the following:

  • 20GB for “/”
  • 250GB for /home (where all Steam games are installed/other things are installed)
  • Another big partition for data. This way the important stuff would be here.

Question two:

Does extended partitions have less performance than primary ones?

On 2013-05-11 17:56, amarildojr wrote:
>
> Question one.
>
> I decided to stick with openSUSE 12.3 x64, but I’m afraid of having to
> re-isntall it for some reason. If I ever need to do so, could I re-use
> the current /home partition without formatting it?

Yes, of course.

> Would the current
> config files conflict with the brand new ones? (driver cfgs and such)

Hold on. The “driver cfgs and such” are system files and not stored at
/home, so they are destroyed. They are system things, not user things.
Your own user configs are in /home and thus respected.

System configs are mostly under /etc.

> Question two:
>
> Does extended partitions have less performance than primary ones?

Absolutely irrelevant :slight_smile:

Once the kernel reads the partitioning info and knows where each
partition is, it no longer matters if they are primary or logical.

Note: “extended partition” is only one, a primary partition that
contains inside a linked list of logical partitions. Thus what you use
for storage are either primary or logical partitions, not the extended one.

It is just a terminology detail :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Hi,

if you installed, as it seems, using 2 different partitions for “/” (root) and /home, that’s just fine.
You could even install a future version of openSUSE then on your “/” partition without reformatting
your /home partition.

Possibly, you may need to delete hidden directories from your /home partition after such an installation
(i.e. the ones whose names start with a period), but probably you shouldn’t delete certain hidden folders
like .thunderbird, in which your past emails etc. are stored.

I never experienced proplems upgrading openSUSE to a newer version, while using separate partitions
for “/” and “/home”, i.e. when I only re-formatted “/” during installation.

Good luck
Mike

I was asking myself that the other night. So basically I could delete all files I want on /home? I’d have two options then:

  • Copy the original /home contents, right after system install, then copy everything exept those Images/Downloads/Documents folders

  • Keep the Images/Music/Downloads/Documents folders and delete everything else. This way openSUSE will re-create them on system instalation

assuming you have a separate home partition. In the install simply tell the installer NOT to format that partition and mount it as /home. This will preserve all your user data and configuration files. You should of course backup any important data in case you you mess things up. In general configuration files are created if they don’t exist but you lose any custom configurations you might have made.

Thank you =)

Saved the default /home folder right after installation, just to be sure.