Cross-compiling glui to windows

Hello,

I’m trying to cross-compile an OpenGL program which uses Glui to a windows machine. I’m using MingW32 to do this. Now I believe I have everything setup to cross compile gl, glu and glut, however glui is failing on me.

So far I’m compiling using a regular makefile which has:

i686-pc-mingw32-g++ ... -lopengl32 -lglu32 -lglut32 -lglui32

However I get the error (although GL/glut.h works fine):

error: GL/glui.h: No such file or directory

I found a site that provides a mingw32-glui package, and so I tried running the rpm they provided: Index of /RPMS/src

However, this rpm is a src, so I’m not sure what to do with it…Any help would be appreciated!

can anyone help me with this please???

dkvasnic wrote:
> can anyone help me with this please???

i can’t help you, i’ve never in my life tried to compile an open
source program to run on a Dark Side machine…i guess there might be
some here who have done that…

you can hang out here, waiting to see if anyone knows anything about
what you are trying to do…but, if it were me i think i’d look for
some help in a forum full of “Window’s Professionals”…

hmmmm…if you had source to a Win32 program would you be asking the
Redmond folks to help you use a GNU compiler it to run on OSX or
Linux? i wouldn’t think they would know how…and, vice versa…


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The src rpm is for manually compiling on a Linux machine. What it will do is recreate the Linux specific code so you can compile the program to run under Linux.

What I think you really want is to obtain a zip code version that can be compiled with cygwin (causes linking to windows apl) If done rightly, you should now have the modules needed to compile for that OS.

You need to remember that the windows apl and Linux apl are very different. They have different module names, different pathspecs, different access points and much more.

You may find your answers here … FAQ | MinGW

While the compiler is designed for and works great in Linux many features are still not ported to Windows so you may run into troubles with this still experimental cross compiler.

At least that’s my take on some of what the site says.

So basically it’d be best to just install windows and compile the programs there?

I’m making a graphics user application that will be used solely by windows users…