Clone a drive to an extended partition.

Can I use clonezilla(or comparable application) on an Leap HDD to clone Leap on ANOTHER HDD to an extended partition on my Windows HDD?

I am trying to do a clone without having to make a ‘live’ USB.

I have read ‘dd’ can do it, but there is a greater chance of data loss versus a dedicated clone app.

You can of course copy the contents of any container to another container (as long as the second container is as least as large as the first one. But I am afraid that this technical answer is far from what you want to know.

My advice is (see also: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#goal) to explain what exactly you want to achive, complte with your present situation in things like

fdisk -l

maybe

lsblk -f

with your clarification about what is what, etc.

Because nobody can read minds here, nor look over your shoulder and I am afraid that a lot of advice will be forthcoming based on assumptions and not on facts. :frowning:

Yep no problem! I can do the fdisk & lsblk, plus images taken from Gparted of all three drives.

BTW, I wasn’t looking for seers or mind readers, just an answer to a simple question. CAN IT BE DONE.

thanks for your reply.

See my first paragraph in post #2.

But do not blame me for anything, because I have no idea what the results of a successful copy will be for your installed systems.

https://susepaste.org/88154832 /dev/sda Disk I want to ‘clone’ - and eventually remove from the machine(PATA HDD)

SUSE Paste /dev/sdb Disk I want to clone to(Windows)

SUSE Paste /dev/sdc Disk I want to clone FROM(ie, an application on this drive to do the clone /dev/sda to /dev/sdb

fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 149.05 GiB, 160041885696 bytes, 312581808 sectors
Disk model: WDC WD1600AAJB-0
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xfb30b87c

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1            2048  16779263  16777216    8G 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda2  *     16779264 100665343  83886080   40G 83 Linux
/dev/sda3       100665344 312581807 211916464  101G 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 465.76 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ST500NM0011
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00000001

Device     Boot  Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1  *      2048    206847    204800   100M  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sdb2       206848 976771071 976564224 465.7G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

Disk /dev/sdc: 149.01 GiB, 160000000000 bytes, 312500000 sectors
Disk model: ST3160815AS
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xf0528969


Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/sdc1            2048  16779263  16777216   8G 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sdc2  *     16779264 104859647  88080384  42G 83 Linux
/dev/sdc3       104859648 312499999 207640352  99G 83 Linux
lsblk -f
NAME   FSTYPE FSVER LABEL           UUID                                 FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINTS
sda
├─sda1 swap   1     PATA-Swap       d42d52f6-55e1-4ab5-9c4f-97ed99ff7791
├─sda2 ext4   1.0   PATA-160-root   051b6256-64ea-4349-aa55-4d82e6c74924
└─sda3 ext4   1.0   PATA-160-Home   e917ba44-b9ed-41db-9bfc-fcfbd4b6a38d
sdb
├─sdb1 ntfs         System Reserved 0E3688873688720F
└─sdb2 ntfs         Windows 7       984C95634C953D46
sdc
├─sdc1 swap   1     swap            9ba115d2-e76a-4f39-838c-3541ca12c1aa                [SWAP]
├─sdc2 ext4   1.0   SATA160-Root    dfeee06d-d7ad-4bb5-99bb-eb4e7225c88c   31.7G    18% /
└─sdc3 ext4   1.0   SATA160-Home    111bc31f-f2c2-453c-be4d-1c223838df46     66G    27% /home

Yep, will keep that in mind!

That is much better information. I am not sure about the remarks between ( ). One says something about the bus the device it is connected to (which is not very interesting for the case of copying), the other seems to be an indication of the operating system installed on it (again not interesting when you want to overwrite it).
I make these remarks so you can follow my strain of thinking and when I think incorrect, you can see that before my conclusions lead to borking something you do not want borked.

Then sda is ~150 GB and sdb is ~465 GiB. So the contents of the first will fit on the second.
The following will copy the contents of /dev/sda to /dev/sdb:

dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb

Will take some time (for coffe or something more usefull).
Afterwards /dev/sdb will show the same partition table of /deb/sda and have (thus) the same partitions with the same file systems (or swap area). Remark that the UUIDs of the file systems will also be the same. Thus they are no more unique on the system. Better remove the sda disk as soon as possible. And after that of course the naming of the devices will be different (probably sdb > sda).
As far as I think, when the BIOS allows, you can now boot from new /dev/sda. It could be that Grub still thinks the Windows system is there, but that can be repaired with YaST I assume (that is what I would try).

Last warning, be careful, do not mistype the device names or you will destroy something you shouldn’t.

BTW, there will be unused space on new sda now. Because you have a DOS partition table filled with partitions 1, 2 and 3, you can either create one more partition (4) (with all the unused space), or an extended partition (4) and more locigal partitions.

I all the time assume you are clever enough to have made an extra backup of all you do not want to loose :wink: