Can't eject DVD.

I have been unable to eject a DVD manually so I tried right-clicking on
the device in Dolphin and selecting “eject . . .” I got the following
error message.

The requested operation has failed.: Error ejecting: eject exited with
exit code 1: eject: unable to eject, last error: Inappropriate ioctl for
device

Any thoughts on this? I assume it’s a hardware problem as everything
seems to have been falling apart recently.


Graham Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 12.1 (64-bit); KDE 4.7.4; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA); Wireless: BCM4306

I don’t know 'bout dolphin, but can you eject from a terminal ?

Try typing:


eject

or dependant on how this device is labelled:


eject /dev/sr0

or


eject /dev/sr1

Don’t know either

But: I’ve seen where kde users have gnome or sufficient gnome apps installed, where nautilus will hold on to a device like a DVD

If you are using KDE, click on the Device Notifier and next to the DVD you should see an eject icon; click on that and you will be able to eject the DVD. I don’t find this a problem often but, whenever it has occurred, this has worked.

I have a hypothesis that it happens when I insert a disc during boot up and it doesn’t get assigned to a user; so I generally avoid inserting a DVD until I have definitely logged on as a user. But that may be entirely fanciful!

On 08/03/12 19:16, oldcpu wrote:
> eject /dev/sr0

That produces the same error message:
eject: unable to eject, last error: Inappropriate ioctl for device

I’ve tried ejecting whilst rebooting but with no success. I’d try
swapping the drive into my other machine if I hadn’t managed to break
that as well! I get the feeling that, over the past year, I’ve been
singled out by Murphy to prove his Law.


Graham Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 12.1 (64-bit); KDE 4.7.4; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA); Wireless: BCM4306

It could be a bad servo or actuator motor in the drive. I assume rebooting made no difference ?

On 09/03/12 05:16, oldcpu wrote:
>
> It could be a bad servo or actuator motor in the drive. I assume
> rebooting made no difference ?
>

No, I tried rebooting and also powering down for an extended period but
no joy.

I can still access the DVD so might be able to burn 12.2-M2 on it later. :wink:


Graham Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 12.1 (64-bit); KDE 4.7.4; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA); Wireless: BCM4306

You could check if you belong to the “cdrom” group, and also test with a liveCD, although IME it’s a typical hardware failure. The first thing that breaks in most of my desktop DVD drives is the tray mechanism. Either it stops working, and you have to go for a clip, or, more frequently, the tray opens but close immediately after.

If it’s a desktop you could check the cabling, once I had a defective IDE cable that would make the drive perform erratically, but that is usually a long shot.

Hello,
I have the same problem on OpenSuse 12.2.
After burning a DVD , one times I can do ‘eject /dev/sr1’. After this I get the same error :
eject: unable to eject, last error: Inappropriate ioctl for device

I found a workaround, not nice but it works (drive is closed!):
eject -t /dev/sr1 ; eject /dev/sr1

Have a nice day
Dirk

This thread reminds me of why I switched to doing installs from a USB.

I have an 8 year old computer that can no longer boot from a CD. However, it can still boot from a DVD.

I had a 5 year old tower, where I could not open the CD/DVD drive to insert a new CD (or DVD). However, if I tilted the computer enough, then it would open. If there was already a CD in the drive, it could eject.

So now, I have converted it to a non-tower, so that it is rotated 90 degrees from before. The CD drive seems to work that way.

CD/DVD drives are fragile hardware. That’s why I switched to preferring USB installs and USB rescue disks.

On my previous laptop the drive broke like this.

eject -T /dev/sr0

would do the tric.

But executing the same command on my current laptop doesn’t do anything but generating a click sound in the drive (which still works OK).