Can't compile VMware Tools kernel modules on OpenSUSE 13.1

This is driving me insane. Whenever I attempt to install kernel modules using the vmware-config-tool.pl utility, it comes back with…

  • This program could not find a valid path to the kernel headers of the running kernel. Please ensure that the header files for the running kernel are installed on this system.

Can someone tell me how to fix this. I’ve installed the C/C++ development and kernel development patterns, so all the dependancies should be satisfied. I figure I can’t have been the first person to try and install VMware Tools on OpenSUSE 13.1, yet google offers me nothing. The tool gives me the option to specify a path for the kernel headers, but I’m not sure where to point it? /usr/src/linux doesn’t seem to work.

Cheers

On 2014-01-13 08:16, tomwardrop wrote:

There is a subforum dedicated to virtualization. It’s better you ask
these questions there, you reach more people that know about this
particular matter. You can still request moderators to move your post
there - just click on the triangle button below.

> This is driving me insane. Whenever I attempt to install kernel modules
> using the vmware-config-tool.pl utility, it comes back with…

Guest or host?

People normally just install the rpm that the distribution provides, and
forget.

> - This program could not find a valid path to the kernel headers of the
> running kernel. Please ensure that the header files for the running
> kernel are installed on this system.
>
> Can someone tell me how to fix this. I’ve installed the C/C++
> development and kernel development patterns,

And kernel sources?

> The tool gives me the option to specify a path for the kernel headers,
> but I’m not sure where to point it? /usr/src/linux doesn’t seem to work.

If they are installed, no need to point it anywhere. It knows.

Notice: after installing kernel sources, you have to “prepare” them:


cd /usr/src/linux

echo "-- cloneconfig --" && make cloneconfig && \
echo "-- scripts --" && make scripts && \
echo "-- prepare --" && make prepare && \
echo "-- Done good! --"


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

I tried as suggested but no dice. I wonder if it’s got something to do with the fact I seem to be running the desktop kernel rather than the default kernel (this is just how openSUSE installed). How do I switch back to the default kernel?

Also, what RPM are you talking about. What’s the name of it, where do I get it? I notice there are packages for the mouse and video adapter, but my whole issue is that I don’t have a network adapter. It seems OpenSUSE perhaps doesn’t like vmxnet3 out of the box. Not having a network connection makes everything harder.

Cheers,
Tom

On 2014-01-14 00:16, tomwardrop wrote:
>
> I tried as suggested but no dice. I wonder if it’s got something to do
> with the fact I seem to be running the desktop kernel rather than the
> default kernel (this is just how openSUSE installed). How do I switch
> back to the default kernel?

No, any kernel will do.

> Also, what RPM are you talking about. What’s the name of it, where do I
> get it?

kernel-source, of course. Just start the YaST package manager and select it.

> I notice there are packages for the mouse and video adapter, but
> my whole issue is that I don’t have a network adapter. It seems OpenSUSE
> perhaps doesn’t like vmxnet3 out of the box. Not having a network
> connection makes everything harder.

No, the network driver should be installed from the start without
problems. If you have more problems like that, related to using
virtualization, please ask a moderator to move this thread there. Just
click on the little triangle below and ask.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

tomwardrop wrote:
>
> This is driving me insane. Whenever I attempt to install kernel modules
> using the vmware-config-tool.pl utility, it comes back with…
>
>

Next time you may opt to post virtualization related in the
“virtualization forums”

you may need to install this package

kernel-desktop-devel - Development files necessary for building kernel
modules


GNOME 3.10.2
openSUSE 13.1 (Bottle) (x86_64) 64-bit
Kernel Linux 3.11.6-4-desktop

I meant in response to you saying “People normally just install the rpm that the distribution provides, and forget.”, inferring people don’t install vmware tools manually, they get it as an RPM.

If you have more problems like that, related to using
virtualization, please ask a moderator to move this thread there. Just
click on the little triangle below and ask.

Yeah I’ve already put the request through to have it moved.

I’ve installed every package that mentions the word kernel, and still no dice. VMware tools just doesn’t want to know about it.

If I run lspci -nnk I can see the NIC and reports that it’s using the vmxnet3 driver, but it’s not showing under “Network Interfaces”. What’s going on here?

On 2014-01-14 01:56, tomwardrop wrote:

> I meant in response to you saying “People normally just install the rpm
> that the distribution provides, and forget.”, inferring people don’t
> install vmware tools manually, they get it as an RPM.

Ah, sorry.

vmware-guest-kmp-desktop - Open Virtual Machine Tools

(or …-default)

libvmtools0 - Open Virtual Machine Tools - shared library
open-vm-tools - Open Virtual Machine Tools
open-vm-tools-gui - Open Virtual Machine Tools - GUI

and probably these:

xf86-input-vmmouse - VMware Mouse input driver for the Xorg X server
xf86-video-vmware - VMware SVGA video driver for the Xorg X server

The ethernet kernel module I have is “e1000”, and it is part of the
kernel by default. The box says "82545 Gigabit Ethernet Controller
(Copper). It is not the same as the host.

>> If you have more problems like that, related to using
>> virtualization, please ask a moderator to move this thread there. Just
>> click on the little triangle below and ask.
>>
>
> Yeah I’ve already put the request through to have it moved.

Ok.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Ok, I believe at some point along the way, I must installed those vm packages as the vmware-config-tool started complaining about pre-existing modules like vmxnet3. I’ve then discovered that the Nic was now being detected in device viewer or lspci -nnk. Of course, linux being the most unfriendly operating system in existence fails to show the network adapter in any of the standard network configuration interfaces. Had to manually create an ifup file for it in the end which like magic makes it appear in the GUI.

What a great big <profanity> waste of time.

CLOSED. Will be moved to virtualistion.

Moved and open again.

Well, if you want to use your desktop’s NetworkManager applet, NetworkManager has to be running. You can configure that in YaST->Network Devices->Network Settings->Global Options.

By default, “Traditional Method using ifup” is used when installed in VMWare, in that case you have to configure your network interface in YaST (or by editing the files in /etc/sysconfig/network/ directly).

But in the case of VMWare there should be no need to configure (or compile) anything at all. The network interface should work out-of-the-box. And it did for me any time I tried it so far…

My advice…

One of the nice things about virtualization is that the Guests are so disposable, it’s often far easier to trash a brand new VM that’s not working right and re-build. To make things even easier, next time you build a VM, the first thing you should do after the install finishes is to clone the VM… Then you always have a base VM to clone so you don’t need to ever go through that hour plus of installation again.

So, back to your problem. I ran into the same problem recently installing Virtualbox Guest Additions in CentOS. Although it might be less likely without a network connection, your problem might be the same as mine in that the kernel version and kernel sources might not be aligned. Updating the system should bring both into alignment

zypper up

In fact, I highly recommend the <very first> thing you should do after installation (with a network connection) is to update the system so you pull in every fix and improvement that has been released since the initial launch.

If you have problem getting your brand new VM a network connection, post

  • The Network type (Bridging, NAT, Host Only)
  • The emulated NIC (Network Adapter)

And, of course it might be worth reposting the following just to keep all the information in one post

  • Distro and version
  • Virtualization technology and version (eg VMware Player or Workstation plus version)

Remember, after you install kernel-dev, you need to update your system.

TSU

TSU

On 2014-01-14 11:46, hcvv wrote:
>
> Moved and open again.

Thanks.

On 2014-01-14 04:56, tomwardrop wrote:

> Ok, I believe at some point along the way, I must installed those vm
> packages as the vmware-config-tool started complaining about
> pre-existing modules like vmxnet3. I’ve then discovered that the Nic was
> now being detected in device viewer or lspci -nnk. Of course, linux
> being the most unfriendly operating system in existence fails to show
> the network adapter in any of the standard network configuration
> interfaces. Had to manually create an ifup file for it in the end which
> like magic makes it appear in the GUI.
>
> What a great big <profanity> waste of time.

Frankly, I don’t understand your problems. I have installed many times
openSUSE under vmware, and all of them worked instantly and out of the
box (except when I was doing experiments looking for trouble intentionally)

Maybe you’d like to start over from scratch?

How did you install? Did you perchance use the autoinstall feature of
vmware? Don’t.

And for the record, I find openSUSE Linux very friendly. In fact, I find
Windows very unfriendly :-p


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)