Cannot save current theme

KDE desktop - After updating to Plasma 5.5.4 w/ QT 5.5.1, kernel 4.1.15-8 I cannot save a desktop theme. I can only change it for the session. The change does not survive a shutdown nor a logout.

Have been using openSUSE desktop theme. After updating Plasma, my desktop icon labels changed. I fixed that by changing desktop theme to Breeze. The change is not permanent.

Is there a way to force a save? Am I doing something wrong? Is this a new bug?
Is there a specific file I can manually edit in order to force a permanent change?

thanks, Jon

If you upgraded from openSUSE 13.2 or another older release, I am afraid you have to wipe out all your previous KDE settings, — otherwise you will constantly face glitches like this, or you may not see some control applets, or unable to change some settings (i. e. dialogs will be empty or disabled).

However, before such a radical action, it would not hurt to try doing the same thing (altering appearance settings) as root: no matter how crazy it may sound, it really helped me at least once in some older openSUSE release.

There actually is no openSUSE desktop theme.
Well, there is, but it is empty and just uses Breeze.

Try to set a different one and it should stick.

That’s absolutely not necessary.
Plasma5 uses completely different config files anyway.

However, before such a radical action, it would not hurt to try doing the same thing (altering appearance settings) as root: no matter how crazy it may sound, it really helped me at least once in some older openSUSE release.

And I would strongly discourage against this as well.
If at all, try with a fresh normal user account.

Try upgrading from an older (KDE4-based) release and see for yourself that some applets are missing and other disabled or cannot save changes made by user.

If at all, try with a fresh normal user account.
That is exactly how I verified that I needed to remove the old settings. The idea was not mine, however, — I read it on the web, so it is obviously a common issue.

I am in fact running both KDE4 and Plasma5 concurrently here… :wink:

That is exactly how I verified that I needed to remove the old settings. The idea was not mine, however, — I read it on the web, so it is obviously a common issue.

Yeah, but you suggested to login as root to try.
If root’s settings are borked, this won’t help either anyway.

Although I never had to remove my KDE4 settings here either, but then I was always using the latest version from the additional KDE repos.
If you upgrade from one openSUSE release to the next it is a bigger step.

Oh no. Sorry if I was unclear — that I meant was simply running kdesu systemsettings5 from regular user environment, not starting a full-fledged root session in KDE.

Please post output of

zypper lr -d

And how should this help with regard to the desktop theme?
It will change root’s desktop theme, which you won’t even see if you don’t login as root.
So you won’t even know whether it worked…

Again, the best way to rule out problems with the user settings or check whether certain problems are related to the user settings, is to create a fresh user account and login as that.

Your statement is weird, to say the least. Those settings obviously apply (some even on-the-fly) to all kdesu-launched applications, at least to those who respect it and to what degree. For example, YaST Control Center (the main applet) accepts color theme and font change, but disregards “signle-click vs double-click to open”. Other YaST applets, either launched from Control Center or autonomously, respect font settings, but always use some predefined color scheme. Widget style is also a common thing to ignore.

How may root settings be connected to regular user settings, is beyond my understanding. I just describe that I see: with each minor release a new theme is brought to openSUSE, and with each major release the way that desktop themes / color themes / cursor themes / splashscreen themes / etc are managed is broken again and again, and user has to do many crazy things to regain control, — things that should not have any effect in theory, but do have in practice. For example, I also remember fixing some permissions for power management or removable device plugging or system shutdown or whatever, — by a sequence of actions described in some “how-to”, which seemed purposeless at first, but actually did the trick. If nothing ever breaks this ugly in your parallel universe with ponies and rainbows, you are are lucky person indeed, I envy you.

Your statement is weird as well.
This is about changing the desktop theme.
Do you want to run the desktop with kdesu as well?

How may root settings be connected to regular user settings, is beyond my understanding.

They aren’t.
But root is just another user, with his own separate settings.
If you have problems with the settings for your normal user account after an upgrade, you might just as well have problems with root’s settings after an upgrade.

I repeat a last time: the best way to check whether a problem is related to the user config files, is to create a fresh user account.
root’s account just keeps the config files like any other user account. (unless you upgrade by formatting your root partition)

If nothing ever breaks this ugly in your parallel universe with ponies and rainbows, you are are lucky person indeed, I envy you.

Please, don’t become offensive now!

I already even gave a possible explanation why I might not have had such problems although (at least some) other users have.
Always upgrading KDE (in this case) from one minor version to the next is of course less intrusive than jumping from let’s say 4.11 to 4.14 (when upgrading from 13.1 to 13.2 e.g.).

And again, “upgrading” from KDE4 to Plasma5 is not affected by this anyway, as Plasma5 uses different config files in different folders, and just ignores the KDE4 settings.
This only applies to the desktop itself though (what this thread is about). Applications do (or should) migrate their settings from KDE4, and applications that are still KDE4 based do just continue to use the old settings of course.