Can I run openSUSE on this laptop or would UEFI restrict that?

This is a Windows 8 ultrabook, so it’ll have UEFI and I’m not sure if I can disable that and install openSUSE. Does anyone know?
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On Tue 22 Jan 2013 06:26:01 PM CST, 6tr6tr wrote:

This is a Windows 8 ultrabook, so it’ll have UEFI and I’m not sure if I
can disable that and install openSUSE. Does anyone know?

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Hi
Have you looked online for a user manual? Can the UEFI system be
browsed, can you add EFI entries according to the manual?


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 12.2 (x86_64) Kernel 3.4.11-2.16-desktop
up 4:16, 3 users, load average: 0.08, 0.12, 0.08
CPU Intel® i5 CPU M520@2.40GHz | GPU Intel® Ironlake Mobile

openSUSE supports installation on UEFI. Or do you mean “secure boot”?

I mean secure boot I think. Since this is Windows 8, it will have secure boot.

Windows logo on x86 makes it mandatory to be able to disable secure boot.

arvidjaar is correct: on x86 machines, secure boot must be allowed to be disabled. (Thanks to Microsoft’s efforts, this is not true of ARM devices, but is of x86 systems.)

Also, the system may allow you to use legacy BIOS instead of UEFI - though you can certainly use UEFI and Grub2 (without secure boot) with Suse until such time as Suse (and other Linux distros) evolve effective means of dealing with the problems of getting their boot loaders signed, etc. For more information on this, see: https://www.suse.com/blogs/uefi-secure-boot-details/

You should not have any trouble, you just won’t be able to use secure boot for now.

Ok, finally I see a good answer to laptop shopping. Thank you and the Lews for posting this. So if I go shopping at a hardware store and find the windows 8 logo or whatever microsoft is using now then I can assume it will have secure boot that can be turned off.

What should I look for when shopping online for a computer with a way to turn off secure boot?

Question: Is there an example of Secure Boot not being able to turn off? Why would a manufacture want this feature not to be able to be turned off?
This has been my fear and why I have been hunting so carefully for a laptop. Seems to me I have read reports of people not being able to remove Windows 8 and just put Linux, maybe they were not correct.

Do you/you guys believe a minute that what MS was trying to achieve with secure boot was secure booting?
If not - as I suspect - and users should be able to turn it off, either it has to become impossible in the future (they’ll figure out something) or they will have to figure out something else.

Just my two cents.

On Tue 29 Jan 2013 02:56:01 PM CST, please try again wrote:

arvidjaar;2522155 Wrote:
> Windows logo on x86 makes it mandatory to be able to disable secure
> boot.

Do you/you guys believe a minute that what MS was trying to achieve
with secure boot was secure booting?
If not - as I suspect - and users should be able to turn it off, either
it has to become impossible in the future (they’ll figure out something)
or they will have to figure out something else.

Just my two cents.

Hi
The never will :wink:

To be honest now that I have played around on the two machines I have
here that boot UEFI, I like it… now these are not win8 machines, so
no idea what those UEFI implementations are like. So easy to have
operating systems all over the place as well as efi files, as long as
you can load the efi into the nvram, you can boot…


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 12.2 (x86_64) Kernel 3.4.11-2.16-desktop
up 14:16, 3 users, load average: 0.14, 0.06, 0.06
CPU Intel® i5 CPU M520@2.40GHz | GPU Intel® Ironlake Mobile