bootchart

Don’t know if this is new with openSuse 11.2 but there is a program that runs on startup that logs the boot processes and creates a picture
/var/log/bootchart.png
kinda neat but it is a hard disk hog eats almost a gig of hd space each boot checkout the /tmp directory

dale14846
I don’t have /var/log/bootchart.png and my /tmp is about 115K. I’m on latest kernel 2.6.30-rc6 and KDE4.3, upgraded from milestone1 (DVD install) using zypper dup with factory repo.

Probably not what you are looking for, but better than nothing. :slight_smile:

maybe I downloaded it without knowing
After the latest upgrade it doesn’t seem to
use as much disk space about 10mb as opposed to 1 gb+ each boot. I think after I play with it a bit I’ll uninstall cause it has to slow boot time

It was in my log
http://thumbnails4.imagebam.com/3750/931d5f37497491.gif](http://www.imagebam.com/image/931d5f37497491/)

I don’t have that .tgz either, any idea what it’s for, and why you have it and I don’t? DVD v. live-cd for example?

Mine was a cd install
All I have done is add the factory kde4 and update that.

I just posted that to show the size of the file. Where the heck 1GB came from I have no idea Re; @dale14846

mine was a live kde install

btw I deleted it using yast. Yikes! got kernel panic on reboot and
had to do a reinstall
guess I’ll just have to read the documentation you know reaaad the instructions after the thing breaks

Bootchart has been there for years now, it’s just not installed by default - on 11.1 (and previous) you can just zypper it from the OSS repo.

I can confirm the complaints. Milestone1-kde4 live cd does install bootchart by default, it does generate about 1 GB of data per boot, and a full blown kernel panic and immediate halt if you remove bootchart in the decent way, i.e. through Yast or zypper.
What i did is ajust the number of days things can stay in /tmp

Thanks to all for the additional info and thereby warnings. Luckily my milestone1 dvd install gave it a miss, and so will I. :wink:

I removed bootchart again and then ran mkinitrd
that seemed to fix the kernel panic problem

as a side note I think bootchart is a good idea but there needs a way to turn it off and on but there doesn/t seem to be any

Well, there is, but it’s not very well documented. In /etc you’ll find a file bootchart.conf with a lot of options. In that file you can turn off a lot of options, making it less annoying.
And Dale14846, you are right, running mkinitrd after removal solves the problem as well, but I don’t do that after removing packages, and when the kernel-panic is already there…

I don’t either but I like to experiment don’t know why I tried mkinitrd but it worked making mistakes and searching for answers aand after hours/days of frustrations helps us become experienced users and that helps us be able to
help others avoid pitfalls
for example do not run mkinitrd -A ( -A Create a so called “monster initrd” which includes all features
and modules possible. )

mkinitrd -A …You do that once and will always remember that ‘there was this little something about the -A’ :wink:
Issueing a ‘mkinitrd’ creates a new ramdisk, in our case without the bootchart program being loaded, so that solves the issue.