Boot console resolution

Hi,
I just upgraded from openSUSE 12.3 to 13.1. In Yast-‘Boot Loader’-‘Boot Loader Options’ I set ‘Use graphical console’ and ‘Console resolution’ to “1024x768x24”, the maximum the connected monitor supports.
The boot process actually starts with 1024x768 but then it switches to a higher resolution and the monitor shows ‘VIDEOMODUS NICHT DARSTELLBAR’.
Later in boot process it shows the graphical login screen in 1024x768 again and I can login in a KDE session. Switching to a console by Ctrl+Alt+F1 for example again shows ‘VIDEOMODUS NICHT DARSTELLBAR’.
What to to?

Thanks, Martin

Hello,

I do not know the answer, but for the benifit of others:
VIDEOMODUS NICHT DARSTELLBAR can be translated as CAN NOT DISPLAY VIDEO MODE.

Also it might be of interest to explain what you mean with the generic word “upgrade” in this case. There are several ways to go from 12.3 to 13.1 and it is not clear which one you walked. OTOH, it seems that you hadn’t this on 12.3, thus it is possibly not a hangover from 12.3.

BTW, the login screen is not show “later in the boot process”. It is shown “after the boot process”. Maybe only semantics, but understanding your system helps in solving problems.

I pushed the DVD which I burned from the ISO downloaded from here:
software.opensuse.org: Download openSUSE 13.1
in the the dvd drive, restarted the PC, selected ‘Installation’, the monitor showed ‘VIDEOMODE NICHT DARSTELLBAR’, after some minutes there was a screen with some text I don’t remember, the last line was ‘Search for Linux partitions’. After 10 minutes I remembered I had that hanger already with earlier openSUSE versions, I pressed the reset button, entered BIOS setup, disabled the 3.5" floppy drive, restarted the PC, selected ‘Installation’, the monitor showed ‘VIDEOMODE NICHT DARSTELLBAR’, after some minutes I selected ‘update system from openSUSE 12.3’ (I don’t remember the text exactly), then the packages where updated, after 5 hours the package update process was finished.
I removed the DVD, restarted the PC and reactivated the floppy drive. The system did not start. Happily I could run the old kernel, switch to grub2 with help of yast and use the *-default kernel instead the as default configured *-pae kernel because the with the -pae kernel the system does not start with the message ‘Waiting for root device’ (I don’t remember the text exacly).

Thus apart from your video mode problem, which, if I understand you now, already showed in the very beginning of loading the installation DVD, you seem to have other problems.

It looks thus that you used the Update feature from the DVD as the way to upgrade. But I still can not see how you choose this when the monitor does only show an error message.

Again, I do not know exactly how to tackle this, but tryig to solve this from the very beginning and not waiting until after the installation looks important to me.

The boot menu of the installation disk shows ‘Boot from Harddisk’, ‘Installation’ and more I don’t remember exactly. I can check it if it is important. :wink:

hi @mse1,

in -Yast --Boot Loader —Boot Loader Options
have you tried setting :-
---- Vga Mode to ‘Unspecified’

---- Use graphical console, should already be selected
then
---- Console resolution to ‘Autodetect by grub’
then selecting ‘ok’ twice

with multiple monitors of different resolutions the above works with
amd graphics

hth

cheers

@keellambert:
No change with the suggested settings.
BTW, I had to switch off floppy drive again in BIOS because yast stuck in ‘Install boot loader’…

On 2013-11-29 11:26, mse1 wrote:
>
> I pushed the DVD which I burned from the ISO downloaded from here:
> ‘software.opensuse.org: Download openSUSE 13.1’
> (http://software.opensuse.org/131/en)
> in the the dvd drive, restarted the PC, selected ‘Installation’, the
> monitor showed ‘VIDEOMODE NICHT DARSTELLBAR’, after some minutes there
> was a screen with some text I don’t remember, the last line was ‘Search
> for Linux partitions’. After 10 minutes I remembered I had that hanger
> already with earlier openSUSE versions, I pressed the reset button,
> entered BIOS setup, disabled the 3.5" floppy drive, restarted the PC,
> selected ‘Installation’, the monitor showed ‘VIDEOMODE NICHT
> DARSTELLBAR’, after some minutes I selected ‘update system from openSUSE
> 12.3’ (I don’t remember the text exactly), then the packages where
> updated, after 5 hours the package update process was finished.

As the DVD does not contain every package, you need now to upgrade the
rest of the packages.

Ensure that you only have active the four official repos, then do:


zypper up
zypper patch
zypper dup

Offline upgrade
method

Chapter 16. Upgrading the System and System Changes

openSUSE 13.1 Release Notes


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

You mean that installing by zypper up/patch/dup instead to use the provided ISO upgrading from openSUSE 12.3 to 13.1 takes less than 5 hours or zypper up/patch/dup produces a screen resolution which can be displayed on the monitor?
The first thing I do after installing a new openSUSE version is to make an online update with yast. It took another hour but changed nothing.

On 2013-11-29 16:56, mse1 wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2603450 Wrote:
>> On 2013-11-29 11:26, mse1 wrote:
>>> , after some minutes I selected ‘update system from openSUSE
>>> 12.3’ (I don’t remember the text exactly), then the packages where
>>> updated, after 5 hours the package update process was finished.
>>
>> As the DVD does not contain every package, you need now to upgrade the
>> rest of the packages.
>>
> You mean that installing by zypper up/patch/dup instead to use the
> provided ISO upgrading from openSUSE 12.3 to 13.1 takes less than 5
> hours or zypper up/patch/dup produces a screen resolution which can be
> displayed on the monitor?

No.

I say that people upgrading using the DVD, like I do, have to know that
the DVD does not contain the full OSS repo. It can not, it is too small.
Thus it is impossible that the DVD upgrade can upgrade everything.

It is just a fact.

Thus you have to complete the offline upgrade with a careful online
upgrade later.

> The first thing I do after installing a new openSUSE version is to make
> an online update with yast. It took another hour but changed nothing.

That may not be sufficient. You need those 3 steps I wrote about.

And I do not say that this will solve your console resolution, no. But
it is futile to try to address the console problem (or any problem
whatsoever) till your system is fully upgraded.

I know what I talk about, I have been doing this operation for more than
a decade.

You can verify if the operation is needed by running this query:


rpm -q -a --queryformat "%{INSTALLTIME}	%{INSTALLTIME:day} \
%{BUILDTIME:day} %-30{NAME}	%15{VERSION}-%-7{RELEASE}	%{arch} \
%25{VENDOR}%25{PACKAGER} == %{DISTRIBUTION} %{DISTTAG}
" \
| sort | cut --fields="2-" | tee rpmlist \
| egrep -v "openSUSE.13\.1" | less -S

It lists everything not belonging to the 13.1 distribution.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

The problem is:

  • You suggest to do (as root I assume):

zypper up
zypper patch
zypper dup

  • In order to do so I first have to carefully check what this commands do. I can do this, I can even read the sources of zypper but it is a not negligible effort.
  • Because of the “not negligible effort” I like to use the update facility of the Linux distribution of my choice because I hope “they do it right”.

BTW, a problem which showed already by the boot process of the install-DVD most likely is not caused by a distribution-alien-package. :wink:

Martin

On 2013-11-30 09:56, mse1 wrote:
>
> The problem is:
> - You suggest to do (as root I assume):
>
> Code:
> --------------------
>
> zypper up
> zypper patch
> zypper dup
>
> --------------------

Yes. But first make sure that only the four official repositories are
enabled: oss, non-oss, updates, updates-non-oss. If there is any other
one (besides the dvd) the results of dup can be unpredictable. No
packman, thus.

> - In order to do so I first have to carefully check what this commands
> do. I can do this, I can even read the sources of zypper but it is a not
> negligible effort.

zypper and yast are the native openSUSE installation/update tools. YaST
is graphical, zypper is command line.

“zypper up” does package updates, similarly to what “apper” does. It is
also equivalent to fire up yast, display the entire list of pacakages,
right click, select “update if newer is available”. Every package that
has a newer version is updated. It should catch any leftover package
from 12.3 because, hopefully, there is a newer version for 13.1

“zypper patch” is equivalent to YaST Online Update. It does the official
updates, those that come from the 2 update repos. There should be none
after the previous step, but just in case.

“zypper dup” changes everything to the versions in the active
repositories. By this time, there should be none or very few to do, but
it catches those packages that did not get a version update from 12.3 to
13.1. It can also downgrade or remove some packages if necessary.

Zypper commands are often given as advise in documentation and forums
because the exact command you need to run can be specified, rather than
explaining a long series of clicks.

> - Because of the “not negligible effort” I like to use the update
> facility of the Linux distribution of my choice because I hope “they do
> it right”.

They do it right, yes, but you have to be aware of its limitations. If
the DVD were a bluray with the entire repo (40 GB?), you would not have
to do those steps.

It is as simple as that: the DVD is too small.

> BTW, a problem which showed already by the boot process of the
> install-DVD most likely is not caused by a distribution-alien-package.
> :wink:

Huh?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Solution: Add

video=VGA-1:1024x768 drm_kms_helper.edid_firmware=edid/1024x768.bin

to the kernel boot parameters.