Best way to see folder in Dolphin on other comp on network?

I have two linux computers (opensuse 11.0 and Fedora 11) on the same network and I want to share the Fedora’s folder so I can see it in dolphin (or any GUI windows folder app). What’s the best/quickest way to do this?

Thanks!

Setup ssh.
Decide which machine is going to be the server and which is going to connect. Enable ssh in the firewall of the server.
Now use the connecting client and setup a key as here
http://susewiki.org/index.php?title=Public_Key_Authentication_with_SSH

Copy the key to the server as instructed (I think I used a pen drive, I had trouble with my setup) And I used a password as well as the key. You need to edit the ssh config files on the server too see section 6. onward

Then to login from the remote client:
fish://xxxx@192.168.0.2/home

xxxx=username of sever
192.168.0.2 = LAN IP of server

I’ve been using Dolphin for this very task this week to look at files on an Ubuntu server I have set up for website testing. I was able to view files via sftp (ftp over sssh). For example, I entered the following in Dolphin to peruse the /var/www directory:

sftp://192.168.53.94/var/www

I have to enter remote username and password before proceeding, but very simple.

How do I do that? I can’t seem to find a good tutorial online. What do i need to do and what settings do I use?

Start with SSH - openSUSE

A good primer tutorial: Unix-Tutorials.com - OpenSSH/Keychain Howto

Some best practices explained: Top 20 OpenSSH Server Best Security Practices

I ran sshd. I setup the config as required. i created pub/priv keys on both computers. But I can’t get a connection to stay open!!

If I ssh to the server, it says:

Last login: Sat Sep 12 02:28:32 2009 from 192.168.1.104
Connection to 192.168.1.103 closed.

If I use try to connect through Dolphin (as ssh network folder) after it prompts for the password, it says it cannot connect!

What’s wrong?

And why’s it even asking me for that password? Shouldn’t the public keys (I copied the client’s to the server and set up the authenticated keys file) be sufficient?

A “/etc/init.d/sshd restart” got the password working now but the public key thing isn’t working since I still need to use my regular password!

What version of kde4?

Is it suse loggin in to Fedora or the other way aroud?
Where in the world are you - roughly eg: USA, Austrailia

When you generated the Public Key, did you enter a password or just hit enter?

Can anybody tell me what is wrong in using NFS here?

I used a password on the client’s key, none on the server’s. It’s opensuse logging in to fedora.

How would I do that?

Nice you ask, but as you were asking for a solution and others seem to prefer not to offer NFS, my question was directed to them. The more that, from what I read in this thread, there is a lot of talking on how to do it.

But for your information: NFS is the classic Unix/Linux way of exporting part of the directory tree of one system (the NFS server) to be mounted in the directory tree of another system (the NFS client).

An Example.
On systemA you can export /data/mysql/ and you can mount that on systemB on /databases/MySQL/Adatabase/. On systemB that would integrate into the directory tree like any other filesystem mount. In other words, the end user will not be aware of the fact that the real data is on another system (systemA), the same is he will not be aware that say /home/ is on another fs then /.

I hope you understand that an NFS server can at the same time be an NFS client mounting from a third server (which can be the same system as the client), etc.

For being an NFS server the package *nfs-kernel-server *is needed. Can be configured using YaST > Network Services > NFS server, or by editing /etc/exports (in that case do not forget to start the server, which can again be done using YaST > System > System services (Runlevel) ).

For being an NFS client the package *nfs-client *is needed. Can be configured using YaST > Network Services > NFS Client, or by editing /etc/fstab (in that case again see that the service is started).

It is best to have a consistant set of users/groups on both systems (that means having user myuser on both systems and those users (and the groups) having the same (numerical) userid/groupid).

See also man pages on *export *and fstab (NFS options) and general info on the Internet. When you decide to try it, of course help from the forum is availlable.

But, I am still interested why the other forum members come up with different solutions, not mentioning NFS at all. Their reasons might be very valid and I want to learn from it.

But, I am still interested why the other forum members come up with different solutions, not mentioning NFS at all. Their reasons might be very valid and I want to learn from it.

And vice versa :slight_smile: I agree that NFS shares between linux boxes in this situation is a viable way to go - especially if this is to be a permanent requirement to share files. My own recent experience with sftp was within an enterprise network where security considerations were important. It also allowed me (with no configuration required) to access the remote server (with only remote login username and password details required).

I will try. For me sftp is just a secure replacement of ftp. And ftp is something to transport files to and from remote systems (and I use it for that task).

Now the OP askes for “Best way to see folder in Dolphin on other comp on network”. Now my interpretation (and that is where I might be completely wrong) is that this means about: “how can I use (see/read/write) directories and their files from other systems in the LAN”.
(I do not use Dolphin at all, but suppose you want more that just ‘seeing’ it in some browser).

That would not simply mean copying files to and fro, but accessing them as if on my own system (read/write/execute). And that is where NFS is made for (and I use it for this other task).

(And when the other sysem(s) are not Unix/Linux type but Redmond, Samba was invented for the same purpose).

It sounds slightly similar to the solution I ended up with which was:

  1. Setup ssh on “server”
  2. Connect via ssh on client to specific folder
  3. Use sshfs to mount remote folder as though local

It works perfectly!

The only thing remaining is the question of why it never used the public keys but instead asked me for the login info of the user from the remote server.