bad sectors, with OS 11.4

found many bad sectors in HD (remapped).
Is there a way to fix? Some utility/tool to repair?

thanks

> found many bad sectors in HD (remapped).
> Is there a way to fix? Some utility/tool to repair?

-when you said “found” how did you find them?

-by “remapped” what do you mean? what tool was used to “remap” the drive?

-what is on the drive? how many partitions of what types?

-do you have an off machine backup of all your data on that drive? if
not that should be your next item of business…until you have that i
would not recommend you mount any partition as writable…and,
especially not attempt any “repair”…

fdisk and/or GNU parted are the standard tools to care and feed
disks…there are a number of bootable live CDs which are purpose made
to tend to disk problems…i can’t personally select the one best for
you (i’ve not used any…so far i’ve been able to “get by” using an
openSUSE install disk’s tools…

i highly recommend you move slowly, deliberately and thoughtfully…


DD
Caveat-Hardware-Software
openSUSE®, the “German Engineered Automobiles” of operating systems!

Last century people used to use software utilities to exclude bad sectors from the filesystem. These days HDs have enough microcontroller smarts to remap bad sectors internally. However when the pool of spare sectors runs out, the disk is probably on the way to the scrap yard. So if any bad sectors are visible to the OS, better copy your data to a good disk quickly.

well,

The message appeared just I finished the OS installation on my system. Simply, Opensuse warned me that my disk contains many bad sectors, and that’s all.
If I click on the message I access the “Disk Manager utility”, where I can read that message in “SMART status”: in SMART data, I can find these details:

5- remapped sectors count:

  • normalized: 177;
  • worst: 177;
  • threshold: 140;
  • value: 183 sectors

I totally ignore what that means, and why that problem was not reported by the previous OS (ubuntu), and I’m wondering if there is a way to fix or if that bad sectors are irreversible…

Thanks

@ken_yap provided the best advice

I have seen the same behaviour exactly as you report between the two distros.

That SMART data comes directly from the microcontroller on the HD, not from the Linux kernel. I cannot say why Ubuntu didn’t show you this information, but I can tell you that changing the OS will not change the reality, that is, the HD really does have a significant number of bad sectors and it’s time to migrate your precious data off it.

[QUOTE=ken_yap;2371360]That SMART data comes directly from the microcontroller on the HD, not from the Linux kernel. I cannot say why Ubuntu didn’t show you this information, but I can tell you that changing the OS will not change the reality, that is, the HD really does have a significant number of bad sectors and it’s time to migrate your precious data off it./QUOTE

Yep, see that you get the data you want to keep copied a.s.a.p. while you still can. I ignored this once, got what I deserved: a whole day of restoring backups on a new disk.

[quote="“Knurpht,post:7,topic:70228”]

When bad sectors begin to be to detected in an HDD for the first time it means the surface of the disk is deteriorating. When that happens it most often happens slowly at first then more and more rapidly as time passes. There is NO WAY to reverse the process. In my considerable experience the rate at which a disk’s surface fails is progressively more and more rapid as time passes. One moment they work, and the next moment they don’t. It’s not a question of “if”, it’s a question of “when”.

The bottom line: Listen to the advice you been given in the previous posts. Don’t screw around analyzing the problem. Get a new hard drive and copy the data off the old one now… not “tomorrow”, or when you “get a spare moment”, or “as soon as the kids go back to school”… NOW.

Sorry if that sounds harsh, but I’ve seen a few hundred of these failures, and I’ve also listened to several dozen customers say “I should have listened to your advice.”

On Thu, 04 Aug 2011 07:06:02 +0000, ken yap wrote:

> Last century people used to use software utilities to exclude bad
> sectors from the filesystem. These days HDs have enough microcontroller
> smarts to remap bad sectors internally. However when the pool of spare
> sectors runs out, the disk is probably on the way to the scrap yard. So
> if any bad sectors are visible to the OS, better copy your data to a
> good disk quickly.

I’d second, third, and fourth that advice.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Thanks to all.
As a brand new installation I already backupped all my relevant data from previous OS, so this is not an issue; I’ll avoid to store new relevant data on the PC as of now, until I’ll replace the disk, or buy a new one.

thanks again for your replies.

Just experienced the same problem. Had 11.4 installed with kde, then decided to re-install with gnome. The OS started reporting bad sectors on the drive after running for about an hour and seriously struggling with the wireless drivers :slight_smile:

Anyway, the kde install reported nothing. With gnome started the bad sector thing. Now, I have run Spinrite on the drive, as well as Seatools, as it’s a seagate hdd… and well, the drive is in perfect condition? No errors, no bad sectors, nothing. :\

Now, in my own extensive experience, I’m confident it’s false reporting. But hey, if the drive dies in the next few weeks, I shall be back?

Don’t expect to see me though rotfl!

> Don’t expect to see me though rotfl!

but but but…if it is false reporting, might it be a bug needing to be
reported?


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Engineered Automobile” of operating systems!