Bad sector on disk. Continue installation anyways?

Hi I’m trying to install openSUSE from the 12.1 live KDE CD.
I was originally attempting to run nothing but linux on my computer, but the installation doesn’t go through. I keep getting “Error loading operating system”
So I reinstalled windows and now I’m attempting to dual boot. So I took the default suggested partition and when I start installing i get errors!
First one is when the system is shrinking the windows NTFS partition. I get system error code -3027. It says the disk has bad sector and asks me if I continue or abort installation.
Next few ones are when the system is creating the root and home partitions, etc. I get the error code of -1007, but is essentially the same as -3027. Bad sector on the disk?
And I get something similar creating the swap partition. -3030, i’m assuming its the bad sector on the disk.

I will let you know that I’m running a 10 year old Compaq Presario 6000, so old corrupted bad sector could definitely be an option, I suppose. AMD Athlon XP, ~75 Gb HDD space, 480 Mb RAM (32 Mb go to the Nvidia graphics card)

Any help? What should I do?

Sounds like a new drive is in order. But I’d run a low level scan on the disk to see if the sector is recoverable But then the computer seems a bit low powered for the new OS’s.

Thanks, but would you be able to tell me how I can run a low level scan on the disk?

There is an application(min OS in fact) PartedMagic which after burned on the disk you will boot from and it will provide you a linux os with a bunch of applications to use. one of them it can doa low level scan and I used it multiple times as I had problems with an old drive which is still working after I repaired it with this software. I would highly recommend it. downloads – Parted Magic

On 2011-11-22 02:46, Crispy24 wrote:

> Thanks, but would you be able to tell me how I can run a low level scan
> on the disk?

The best one should be the one provided by that HD manufacturer. Seagate
has a very good one: you download an image of a bootable thing and run it.
Years ago it was a dos floppy, now I think it is a small CD.

The tests it does are the same as the SMART hardware on the disk, which you
can use via smartctl in Linux. But the results are more human readable, and
it can print a report to send the disk for repairs that they accept as
valid report.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

My comments:

I wouldn’t put too much hope on rescuing a HD with bad sectors, but give it a go anyway. Disks these days have internal sector substitution using spare sectors, and when the spare sectors run out, the errors cannot be masked anymore.

With 480MB RAM, you will be better off doing the actual install with the DVD, if you have a DVD drive, even one accessible via the LAN on another machine. Installing off the Live CD requires more RAM than the DVD.

On 11/22/2011 12:26 AM, Crispy24 wrote:
> Any help? What should I do?

no one has yet outlined the hardware requirements for openSUSE 12.1, but
i’m not sure your machine meets the minimum requirements for for 11.4,
here http://en.opensuse.org/Hardware_requirements

i’d suggest you would have a much sweeter running machine if you were to
install a system made for older machines…like Puppy Linux, or one of
the others listed in this old post: http://tinyurl.com/ylf8zq9

if you simply must have openSUSE i’d suggest you FIRST make sure your
install DVD is perfect by doing this: http://tinyurl.com/3qde66h

and, then when you get to the part of the install process where you are
asked to pick your desktop environment from 1) KDE, 2) GNOME or 3)
Other, pick other and then either Xfce or LXDE as both of those require
much less horsepower than KDE or GNOME…

other folks will have other opinions…pick the one you wanna follow.

by the way: it makes no sense to install to a known bad disk…fix that
first!! and if you just wanna install to compare this disto to (say) one
of the other major desktops on the market (like Win7 or OSX) then to be
fair you also need to look at those other desktops on the same 10 year
old, underpowered machine!!

and, thanks for your interest in openSUSE in particular and Linux in
general…it IS worth the trouble to get free (but, there is a STEEP
learning curve)


DD
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Hardware
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Software

On 2011-11-22 03:56, ken yap wrote:
>
> My comments:
>
> I wouldn’t put too much hope on rescuing a HD with bad sectors, but
> give it a go anyway. Disks these days have internal sector substitution
> using spare sectors, and when the spare sectors run out, the errors
> cannot be masked anymore.

That’s correct. My intention is just to verify what’s happening.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

There is a valuable command-line-tool available directly under openSUSE which is ‘badblocks’.

This may not only be used to check HDs, but as well to erase them completely (e.g. before one sells them) !

And in your particular case it would help you more than e.g. smartctl, which is part of the smartmontools.

The smartmontools, which tell you a bit more about the previous life of your HD, are some further great software
available under openSUSE.

SMART means ‘Self Monitoring And Repair Technology’ (a feature modern HDs usually have).

Back to ‘badblocks’: You won’t even get the man pages of that, if you’re not logged in as root.
Otherwise they’re just not displayed.
So open a root console (or become root in a console window) and then ‘man badblocks’
will give you the answers you need.

Of course this requires that openSUSE is running.

This, however, in fact is the case if you boot from the life CD,
or if you boot the rescue system from the installer DVD.
But I never checked whether ‘badblocks’ is available in these environments,
so you would have to try out and see if it’s there.

A funny thing about SMART is that it’s a system on its own, completely independent of
the OS your’re running at that moment.

I once had a HD with bad sectors/blocks (and I still keep this HD for experiments / testing).
Running ‘badblocks’ several times reduced the number of bad sectors, because the HD replaced
broken sectors/blocks by spare sectors, as ken_yap wrote.

However, the numbers of the bad sectors/blocks (or their index) changed from run to run,
and there always have been new bad sectors (‘badblocks’ is reporting the respective sector numbers).
That meant that the HD hadn’t run out of spare sectors yet (would be the scene figured out by ken_yap).

On the other hand the observed behaviour clearly was telling about a worst case scenario:
Probably some particles within the harddisk, which just shouldn’t be there, caused an increasing damage,
and the HD is all but reliable anymore, despite SMART.
Theory and practice.

As well, just like in the postings before, my advice would be to replace your HD.

But keep it, so you will be able to try out the SMARTmontools, badblocks, etc. under unfavourable conditions.

Good Luck
Mike

On 2011-11-22 23:26, ratzi wrote:

> Back to ‘badblocks’: You won’t even get the man pages of that, if
> you’re not logged in as root.
> Otherwise they’re just not displayed.

Your system is badly configured. I get it as user.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Dear Carlos,

… under 11.2 I as well get it as user.
You’re right.

I gathered most of my experience with badblocks under openSUSE 10.2.
Quite a time and some versions ago.

Greets
Mike