Anything I should be aware of before I install 13.2 on a machine with a UEFI BIOS?

Hi folks. I hope to soon be taking delivery of a new machine with a UEFI BIOS. I do remember seing some people posting threads about having problems after trying to install Suse on machines with a UEFI BIOS. So, is there anything I should know before my machine arrives and I try to put Suse on it? I remember seeing someone having problems (no idea if it was this forum or not) and, if I remember rightly, the root cause was that they’d installed Windows and Linux in the “wrong” order. I think they needed to install Linux first and then keep it hidden from Windows so that the machine could start.

My machine will arrive with Windows 7 already installed. Is this likely to cause me problems, or has it been figured out how to stop Windows flying into a jealous rage and the installer has already been updated accordingly? Or, for example, are there any packages I should select for installation during the install procedure to help things go more smoothly? Or am I just worrying over nothing 'cause any UEFI-related issues that may have existed were solved a while ago?

On 2015-05-01 12:36, Stephen Philbin wrote:

> I think
> they needed to install Linux first and then keep it hidden from Windows
> so that the machine could start.

The general advice since ever has been to install Windows first, because
it can destroy everything else it finds.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.

(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” (Minas Tirith))

Well ascertain if Windows 7 is installed in EFI mode or MBR mode. Then boot the install disk in the same mode and you should not have a real problem. But first from Windows reduce the space used to allow free space for Linux to be installed.

UEFI mostly works well. The manufacturers are providing better implementations, and most linux distros are now handling it well. Opensuse support for UEFI is excellent.

My machine will arrive with Windows 7 already installed.

Some vendors are putting the BIOS into legacy (non-UEFI) mode when they provide a computer with Windows 7. So check that. For best compatibility with Windows, you need to boot the same way (Legacy or UEFI) that Windows is booting.

Thanks guys. I knew that it was unlikely that most issues wouldn’t be resolved be now: I just wanted to play it safe. The checking of the boot type sounds vaguely familiar. I guess it was very likely to be that which stuck in my mind as something to watch out for. So how do I confirm if the system is in legacy or UEFI mode and is this a setting of the motherboard or the OS at install? I’m guessing it’s a setting of the OS at install because of the advice the boot the installer in UEFI mode, but I just want to check.

Oh, and how do I change the mode of the installer? I’m using the installer called “openSUSE-13.2-NET-x86_64.iso” from a USB stick. Is it just a case of using one of the F keys at the start of the install process to change some option?

I just don’t want the first thing I do with my new machine to be fouling it up through stupid mistakes.

Both. Your motherboard must be configured to try both BIOS and/or EFI boot and installation media must provide support for either. In which mode you will be installing at the end depends on a) whether installation media supports EFI and b) what boot order is configured in your motherboard. If your motherboard is set to try legacy BIOS boot first, you end up with it, because I think all installers support it. If your motherboard is set to try EFI first and installation media supports EFI boot, you will end with EFI.

Windows 7 32 bit e.g. does not support EFI at all and cannot be installed in this mode. I believe openSUSE live media does not support EFI either.

Is it just a case of using one of the F keys at the start of the install process to change some option?

If you see F keys installer is already booted in legacy BIOS mode, it is too late to change anything.

Look at the drive with a non-Windows utility. (Windows lies) see if there is a small FAT formatted partition usually less then 100 meg. If so at least one OS installed is EFI mode.

If Windows 7 32 bit then it has to been installed as MBR. Windows 7 64 bit could be either.

If the installer boot media has no option at the bottom it has been booted in EFI mode if it has option it has been booted in MBR mode

The boot mode for external media is controlled by the BIOS often the F12 key at boot but it depends so if F12 does not work you are going to have to dig in the Docs of the machine. Often but not always the splash screen at boot will tell you the keys. But it generally goes past fast so pay attention.

In any case for best results all OS’s must be installed in the same mode.

Use Windows to reduce/move partitions to allow for at least 40+ continues gig for Linux

If MBR then you will need an extended partition and you can only have 4 primary partition one of them an extended. The installer should provide it if you leave space and have fewer then 4 primary partitions.

On Fri 01 May 2015 10:36:01 AM CDT, Stephen Philbin wrote:

Hi folks. I hope to soon be taking delivery of a new machine with a UEFI
BIOS. I do remember seing some people posting threads about having
problems after trying to install Suse on machines with a UEFI BIOS. So,
is there anything I should know before my machine arrives and I try to
put Suse on it? I remember seeing someone having problems (no idea if it
was this forum or not) and, if I remember rightly, the root cause was
that they’d installed Windows and Linux in the “wrong” order. I think
they needed to install Linux first and then keep it hidden from Windows
so that the machine could start.

My machine will arrive with Windows 7 already installed. Is this likely
to cause me problems, or has it been figured out how to stop Windows
flying into a jealous rage and the installer has already been updated
accordingly? Or, for example, are there any packages I should select for
installation during the install procedure to help things go more
smoothly? Or am I just worrying over nothing 'cause any UEFI-related
issues that may have existed were solved a while ago?

Hi
Do you plan to upgrade to windows 10 when available? Do you have any
aversion to wipe the windows 7 install and start afresh?

My installs of windows 10 preview in UEFI mode has shown that both
install can co-exist including re-installs of either operating system
with out trashing the other. There is however a caveat if you planning
to upgrade is windows 10 (well the preview) has a couple of extra
partitions.

Here is my current partitioning for openSUE 13.2 and windows 10 preview;


NAME        MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda           8:0    0 119.2G  0 disk
├─sda1        8:1    0   300M  0 part
├─sda2        8:2    0   260M  0 part /boot/efi
├─sda3        8:3    0   128M  0 part
├─sda4        8:4    0    40G  0 part /
├─sda5        8:5    0  29.8G  0 part
│ └─bcache0 253:0    0 298.1G  0 disk /data
├─sda6        8:6    0     8G  0 part [SWAP]
└─sda7        8:7    0  40.8G  0 part
sdb           8:16   0 298.1G  0 disk
└─sdb1        8:17   0 298.1G  0 part
└─bcache0 253:0    0 298.1G  0 disk /data

If you re-install windows 7 in UEFI and select custom install, with
above layout with respect to sda1 (not needed for windows 7), sda2
for /boot/efi and sda3 (needed for windows) you should be in a good
spot for when windows 10 comes along.

I always put windows at the end of the disk since it’s used rarely.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.39-47-default
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This is simple: boot gparted (look up on the internet if you don’t know it).
Open a terminal.
Become root using command ‘su’.
Say: ‘parted -l’
Among other infos this should give you either
‘Partition Table: msdos’ in case your new machine boots in legacy (MBR) mode, as my UEFI capable PC with a ASUS motherboard does (because I configured it that way when installing win7),
or ‘Partition Table: gpt’ (as far as I remember) in case you are UEFI booting.

If you should see anything else than ‘msdos’ or ‘gpt’ after ‘Partition Table:’ you should post it here!

If gparted wouldn’t boot, on the other hand, then this could be a hint that your PC is even booting in ‘secure boot’ mode, of which win7 for sure hasn’t been capable, so that shouldn’t happen at all!

This is a setting that you could - theoretically - change using your BIOS.

But if you want to keep the pre-installed win7, you will have to accept and not change the boot mode and the partition table on the HDD it comes with, unless you would additionally obtain an installation DVD for win7 - I have such, but I didn’t succeed to install win7 (read well, win7, not openSUSE) with a partition table of kind GPT (with win8 that changed).

Anyway:

Please give a bit more details about your machine: which laptop?? Or if it is a PC, which motherboard?? Which video?

Good luck!
Mike

Wow. Lots of great advice from everyone . :smiley:

Ok, so first things first. Here’s the information about the Motherboard and HDDs that it would have been sensible to post at the start.

The Motherboard is an Asus z97 Pro [Wi-Fi ac] and there are two HDDs. I’ve always used seperate HDDs for Windows and Linux just to keep things as simple as possible and to keep them isolated from each other. When the PC was being put together for me I told them to install Windows on a 2 TB HDD and to put a 1 TB HDD in, but not to do anything with it because I’ll be installing other operating systems on it. Obviously, this is where Suse will live.

Normally I wouldn’t have a problem with re-installing Windows, but this machine has come with quite a bit of tweaking already done to it. CPU clock and RAM speeds have been tweaked and stored in a USB stick, the motherboard and maybe somewhere else, but I don’t know yet 'cause it just arrived yesterday and I spent most of the time Just getting Windows on its feet. I haven’t had the chance to read through the paperwork relating to the customisations yet. I only know just enough about hardware to be able to put a PC together. When it comes to over- or under- clocking and the more involved stuff, though, I’m lost. So I just had people that know what they’re doing do it for me. So I’d rather hold off re-installation until I’ve read through the extra informaton and have a better Idea of what’s what.

Firstly though, I should start going through all the advice that’s been posted. I don’t mind wich boot method I end up using, just so long as I can boot either OS. I have a feeling it’ll turn out to be UEFI, but I’ll slowly work my way through to make sure.

Is it still true that the net installer doesn’t work with UEFI? I kina’ prefer the net installer now 'cause I don’t have to keep finding blank DVDs. Will I have to switch back to DVD installation if it does turn out to be UEFI that Windows was installed under? Thanks again to everyone. :smiley:

The Installer works fine with EFI. The trick is to boot it in EFI mode then all things are set to install in EFI mode. It totally depends on settings in the EFI BIOS which mode is the default boot for external drives. If the first screen has options on the bottom you are in legacy mode if not you are in EFI mode.Take you time read and understand each screen before continuing. be sure things are set as you want them be fore proceeding. Because of the choice of setups you need to take control you are in charge don’t assume the software can read your mind.;).

I just tested - NET iso 64 bit boots in EFI mode on EFI system.

I once did it the same way. But having openSUSE on the same HDD (I have it that way now) works just fine as well.

You were busy configuring details?

It was just a question, if you would - at all - be able to re-install win7.
That wasn’t a request to do so.

But what’s in stock?

Legacy or UEFI booting?

How about a post with the output of ‘parted -l’?

Good luck
Mike

I don’t know yet. I’ve just been trying to get hold of a spare USB stick and doing like gogalthorp suggested and taking my time. Obviously the gparted output is the first thing that I should be trying to post up, but I just need a USB stick first. I should hopefully get one some time today.

Ok. So I finally got Gparted on to a USB stick (using LiLi) and tried booting in to it. Unfortunately I couldn’t actually make use of it, though, because it seems that it causes a secure boot violation. Is this some DRM donkey which means that the Suse installer won’t work either and I’m therefore screwed, or what?

You will probably need to disable secure-boot, and turn on CSM (compatibility support module for Legacy booting).

Alternatively, put the opensuse 13.2 live Rescue CD image onto that USB. It will boot with secure-boot enabled, and it contains “gparted”. In my experience with using that Rescue CD, it is best to logout from the XFCE desktop, and login to “Icewm”, then run “gparted” from the command line as root. (The root account uses an empty password).

If this is true then you have given the following wrong information in your 1st posting (!) where your wrote:

Windows 7 has not been able to boot in secure boot mode.
Period.

At least older versions of gparted and partedmagic aren’t able either to boot in secure boot mode. Which would explain your problem, if your PC in fact is booting in secure boot mode.

Which version of windows is installed on your PC??

Nope.
The openSUSE 64bit installer DVD (yes the DVD, I didn’t try the KDE live or Gnome live media yet) boots fine in secure boot, if you give the permission at boot!
I just used that DVD 3-4 months ago to install 13.2 on an Acer laptop that came with ‘no OS’ or with that Linpus Linux, booting in secure boot mode as well.

So, download the 64bit installer DVD, and boot from it.

In the initial menu that comes up say ‘Installation’.

Wait until the first screen ‘Language, Keyboard, and License Agreement’ comes up.

Then press Ctrl-Alt-F2.

You well get a root terminal (prompt ends with a ‘#’ here) in pure text mode.

Enter the command ‘parted -l’ here.

Make a photograph, of the output, so you can afterwards post it here.

Then press Ctrl-Alt-F7 to return to the former screen of the installer.

Say ‘Abort’.

Your windows installation won’t be altered that way.

Well that’s why I was so suprised to see the secure boot notice because you said Widows 7 can’t boot in secure boot. Well it appears that it can and I’ve got the screen-shots to prove it. I took a screen-shot of the warning with my phone when it came up so I could oist it here to prove I’m not a drooling moron. I’m just a regular moron that’s too stupid to be able to figure out how to upload image attachments with posts in this forum. I’ll try downloading and using the live installer from a USB stick tomorrow maybe.

I didn’t mean to say at all that you’re a moron - these are your words!!
Well, there sometimes seem to be fake postings on this forum, and one gets cautious observing this, which in the end means that you waste your time, if you reply.
I was convinced from the start that your posting wasn’t a fake (already looking at the number of your posts) - that’s why I am still writing :slight_smile:

However, I’m still surprised to learn that your windows 7 boots in secure boot mode!

Now try booting the openSUSE 13.2 64bit installer DVD.

Posting photographs here, you can use ‘suse paste’ (search that on the internet), and then give the link in your message in this forum.

Good luck :slight_smile:
Mike

On 2015-05-04 22:26, Stephen Philbin wrote:
> figure out how to upload image attachments with
> posts in this forum.

We upload to susepaste.org, then include the link in the post.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.

(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” (Minas Tirith))