An app to show the temperature (probably of the cpu)

Hi

I’m using default KDE openSUSE 11.3 64 bit

In windows I can see the temperature of my HP laptop (cpu I suppose). Is there a facility for viewing that in Linux / openSUSE. Maybe in KDE, maybe in Yast, wherever?

The reason is that my laptop’s temperature and fan speed increases slowly when I convert large video files from one format to another and the computer eventually shuts down spontaneously when the temperature becomes critical. I’d like to watch this so I can prevent it. So I need the app.

Any thoughts?

Just to monitor temperature? There are plenty of choices.

You could use Conky, either with one of the built-in ‘commands’ (is that the right word) for temperature(s) or to have it run cli-commands and return their output.

You could use a plasmoid that simply runs cli-commands and returns the output. They exist, but I cannot remember the name of any one. Or you could a plasmoid that is dedicated to monitor stuff. Bubblemon, System Monitor, Hardware Temperature, for instance.

Or you could use KDE’s System Monitor and set it up to display the temperature. Might already be installed, and can be found in ‘System’ > ‘Monitor’ > ‘System Monitor’ (Sounds logical, huh?). Simply create a new tab, and add the appropriate sensor(s).

In 11.2 there is a Wiget for the desktop:
Right click on the desktop>Add Widget>System Monitor - Temperature

Also: Dust in the laptop? Two books to let the air better to the fan and the cooling ribs? Slow the processor speed?

Have a lot of fun!
pistazienfresser

As an aside: You will need to install lmsensors (from sourrce or ‘sensors’ package) run sensors-detect and configure /etc/sensors3.conf
There is also an init script (in the source version) that will load the appropriate modules for you automatically at boot.
To use with ksysguard you will need to create a new sheet (File => new sheet), then drag the sensors from the list to the panels.
You can also try monitoring and controlling the fan if it support PWM - pwmconfig is the tool for that.
(Sadly, neither Ksysguard, nor the system monitor applet, appears to support temperature alerts.)
Cheers,
Lews Therin

Works great, thanks

That’s great too, thanks. Bit of a downer that it displays in degrees F, whereas I stopped using that when we changed to C some 45 years ago. So I can’t understand it anymore.

Also: Dust in the laptop?
Yes of course, I’ll have a look.

Two books to let the air better to the fan and the cooling ribs?
I bought a triangular ramped frame 2 years ago – works great.

Slow the processor speed?

Wash your mouth out with soap! lol

The ksysguard tool seems to work fine using Celsius for CPUs (and without lmsensors). And a right-click accesses alarms it seems. And the “widget” can be saved e.g. to desktop. Thanks for the intro.

Fahrenheit? Hm. Funny!

“My” widget uses Celsius (or I guess the Celsius names for Kelvin) even if I select en-USA before the graphic log in (in the GNOME Display Manager - GDM / gdm) .

Maybe half a year ago I improved my settings of the internationalization and language stuff (see: Thread: Again: First day of week - Sunday vs. Monday ?

:wink:
Or in openSUSE 11.3 a guy from Burma, Liberia or the United States of America ‘improved’ some settings away from the Système International d’Unités (SI)? /:wink:

Have a lot of fun!
pistazienfresser

If able to read it directly, ‘konqueror sysinfo:/’ displays CPU temperature as well :slight_smile:

You need to change your setting for measurements, i.e. imperial vs metric. Can be done in ‘Personal Settings’ > ‘Locale’ > ‘Other’. Although, there has been quite a change in how Personal Settings is organized between KDE 4.4 and KDE 4.5. If you can’t find it:

kcmshell4 language

Change ‘Measure System’ to ‘Metric’. And log-out and back in so that the settings can be applied across the board.

OTOH, are you sure that your temperatures are not already displayed in °C? j/k

Actually this is a hint you should follow. Depending on the used cpu-profile you might run your processor without proper speedstepping. A processor does not have to run at full speed all the time and usually offers different modes, ideally adapting to the processes running (for example “ripping a DVD to .mkv” vs. “editing a config-file in the command line”). This will affect the power consumption of your laptop in a positive way too, of course.

Your BIOS might offer you different behaviours for the cpu-fan as well (setting min/max-temperatures etc.), the abillity to speedstep is also configured there. Different cpu-profiles can be set with the ‘cpufrequtils’. I do not know whether any graphical frontends exist for it, but it’s fairly easy to use (via the commands ‘cpufreq-info’ and ‘cpufreq-set’). Concerning the shutdown symptoms you described, you should take a look in your BIOS settings.

Anyway, I digress a bit here. You were asking about convenient monitoring tools; I use the excellent →GKrellM, which will not only show your cpu-temperature, but also the temperature of your harddrive (when ‘hddtemp’ is installed), processor- and network-load, allocation of your partitions and much more. It is extensible via various plugins that even show you incoming emails or the like. It’s marvellous, to say the least.

I also strongly recommend becoming a vegetarian, as it is good for your health and karma. But I might be digressing again here.

Somehow you seem to have discovered the ability to set alarms in ksysgard, but I’m not quite following how you got to that part. I have a page in ksysgard to which I’ve added CPU temps for all my cores. But I can’t seem to define any alarms - right clicking the graph on the left or sensor on the right gives a “configure” option, but no alarms. would you mind clarifying how you got there?

Cheers,
Lews Therin

If you select ‘Digital Display’, and not Line Graph or something, as ‘Display Type’ then you have the ability to enable alarms for minimun or maximun values. But the way I understand it, it only makes the display change color, to red for instance.

If you want a real alarm, I guess you could manage to do this with a shell script. You’d need to find out where the value of your temperature sensor is kept. In my case I can get hold of a temperature measurement like this:
echo $(($(cat /sys/bus/pci/drivers/k8temp/0000:00:18.3/temp1_input) / 1000))
(I guess it would have to read some other file in your case, though. You might want to see what else you find in ‘/sys/bus/pci/drivers/’)
Then write something that makes something happen if a certain threshold is passed. And of course you would need something to run your script every so often.

Hey Lord Emsworth,

The secret was indeed the digital vs. line graph display - weird, you would think it would work in either. In my case, with an Intel i7 using the coretemp module, the /sys node to read is:

/sys/devices/platform/coretemp.0/hwmon/hwmon0/device/temp1_input

Good idea on the bash script - I will employ something very similar and pass the output to g15message, and viola - alert conspicuously displayed on the bright LCD keyboard display. Nice.

Thanks!
Pete

I just stumbled across a something in Personal Settings that made me think of this thread. It appears that there are means provided by KDE that allow you to tie sounds, pop-ups and other notifications to events in certain applications.

Personal Settings > Application and System Notification > Manage Notifications
Event Source: System Monitor
Event: Sensor Alarm
:wink:

Anyway, I digress a bit here. You were asking about convenient monitoring tools; I use the excellent →GKrellM, which will not only show your cpu-temperature, but also the temperature of your harddrive (when ‘hddtemp’ is installed), processor- and network-load, allocation of your partitions and much more

I can’t figure out how to enable GKrellM to display anything else than gpu temp, no hd temp and no cpu temp. To have hddtemp to display anything I have to have root permission. Is it required to set/change some permissions somewhere, add users to a group or similar to gain cpu and hd temp output from GKrellM as regular user?

Hi
As long as sensors is detecting your temps etc it should appear in
Gkrellm. For hddtemp;


sudo chmod 4755 /usr/sbin/hddtemp


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 2.6.32.24-0.2-default
up 2 days 4:24, 2 users, load average: 0.12, 0.06, 0.01
GPU GeForce 8600 GTS Silent - Driver Version: 260.19.21

Forgot to say, you might also want to look at conky? I have a version
on OBS that does Nvidia temps and the lua stuff enabled for fancy
graphics.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 2.6.32.24-0.2-default
up 2 days 4:27, 2 users, load average: 0.07, 0.06, 0.01
GPU GeForce 8600 GTS Silent - Driver Version: 260.19.21

Ok, thanks Malcolm!

Funny, I never had to do that.

kalle@hoppers:~> ll /usr/sbin/hddtemp
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 30860 13. Jul 00:25 /usr/sbin/hddtemp