Alienware 15(2015) 2 x M.2 SSD + SSHD, Grub fails to recognize W10

malcolmewis,

just confirming, you are suggesting writing into the EFI partition in sdc, the Windows drive efi partition.

OR

I have an option to set up efi in sdb, Linux drive by the method:

Or create a partition on /dev/sdb say 100MB set the type to ef00 and format to vfat, then re-install…

Do the following:

  1. Create a directory “/boot/efi”
  2. Edit your file “/etc/fstab” so that “/dev/sdc2” gets mounted at “/boot/efi”.
  3. As “root” do
# mount -a
  1. Check with your favourite file manager that you now have “/boot/efi/EFI”.
  2. Use YaST (as described in various posts here) to install GRUB2 in UEFI mode.
  3. Restart your system and change your UEFI to UEFI boot mode.

If something goes wrong please post the details (error messages, …) here.

Regards

susejunky

Hi
Yes, this is what I normally do, they are happy to co-exist, just have to remember on an openSUSE install to not format :wink:

Or create another one just for openSUSE, you can have multiple ones (ESP’s) they just have to be the special type and on a gpt type disk, then stored in nvram (see output from efibootmgr -v). You can boot multiple systems from one, for example I had one 260MB efi partition, it booted WinX, SLED 12, SLES 12 and openSUSE, each had it’s owned named directory. You can boot multiple openSUSE’s but you need to do some directory name maintenance as they all use the directory name opensuse, user nrickert does this.

The UEFI boot system is much more flexible on what you can do… if secure boot is off you can even run the efi shell and have a good look at the UEFI underlying system and variables.

On HP ProBook systems I can use this to set a boot logo eg the plymouth boot logo, openSUSE Logo, text (eg This system belongs to me, why do you have it :wink: ) what ever as long as it’s an image of a specific pixel size and doesn’t exceed 12Mb from memory…

I also have a script to backup the gpt structure and files for quick restoration.


#!/bin/bash

# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
# under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; either version 2.1 of the License, or
# (at your option) any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
# WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU
# Lesser General Public License for more details.
#
# Copyright (C) 2013-2017 Malcolm Lewis <malcolmlewis@opensuse.org>

EFI_SGDISK_BIN=`which sgdisk`
EFI_BOOT_MGR_BIN=`which efibootmgr`

if (( $# != 3 )); then
    echo "Usage: $0 <EFI_DEVICE> <EFI_PARTITION> <BACKUP_LOCATION>" >&2
    exit 1
fi

EFI_DEVICE="$1"
EFI_PARTITION="$2"
BACKUP_LOCATION="$3"
BACKUP_DATE=`date +\%m%d%y%H%M%S`

echo "*** Backup of disk $EFI_DEVICE gpt information ***"
sgdisk -b /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_backup_$BACKUP_DATE.gpt /dev/$EFI_DEVICE
echo "*** Now creating backup of UEFI partition $EFI_DEVICE$EFI_PARTITION ... ***"
mount -t vfat /dev/$EFI_DEVICE$EFI_PARTITION  /mnt
tar -C /mnt -cvzf /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_esp_$BACKUP_DATE.tgz EFI
umount /mnt
$EFI_BOOT_MGR_BIN -v > /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_efibootmgr_$BACKUP_DATE.txt

tar cjvf /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_backup_$BACKUP_DATE.tar.bz2 \
    /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_backup_$BACKUP_DATE.gpt \
    /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_esp_$BACKUP_DATE.tgz \
    /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_efibootmgr_$BACKUP_DATE.txt

rm /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_backup_$BACKUP_DATE.gpt \
    /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_esp_$BACKUP_DATE.tgz \
    /$BACKUP_LOCATION/`hostname`_$EFI_DEVICE\_efibootmgr_$BACKUP_DATE.txt
echo "*** Backup of UEFI partition $EFI_DEVICE$EFI_PARTITION completed... ***"

Sorry, I’ve been busy, and now I have some time to work on this

susejunky, in the scenario, OpenSUSE fails to boot,

malcolm, I want to try your method also, but the variation that does NOT mess with sdc(Windows SSD)

As I’ve mentioned,

now I’ve invested over a week on setting up the W10 side, with over 1TB of files on that side, and OpenSUSE had about 1-3 hours of my attention so far.

Re-installing is a very viable option as long as W10 SSD does not get touched. In fact, if I fresh-install, I am planning to take out the W10 SSD just in case.

Sorry, i made a mistake!

The procedure should be as follows:

  1. Switch your UEFI to boot in UEFI-mode.
  2. Start the openSUSE install media (DVD/USB stick). Make sure it really started in UEFI mode
    . There must not be an options menu (F1, F2, …) on the bottom of the very first screen. If there are options displayed on the bottom of the very first screen then it booted in CSM or legacy mode. 1. Select “More …” and then “Rescue system”. This will give you a working command-line-only live system.
  3. Log in as “root” (no password needed).
  4. If you don’t want to use your already existing EFI system partition you can now use your favourite tool (e.g. gdisk) to create a new one (Type 0xEF00 with FAT16/FAT32 file system).
  5. Mount your openSUSE root partition
# mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt
  1. Mount your EFI system partition (either the existing or a new one)
# mount /dev/sdc2 /mnt/boot/efi
  1. Do some more mounts
# mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev
# mount -o bind /run /mnt/run
# mount -o bind /sys /mnt/sys
# mount -o bind /proc /mnt/proc
  1. Start a changeroot environment
# chroot /mnt
  1. Install the GRUB2 EFI bootloader
# grub2-install --recheck --nobootsector --target=x86_64-efi

You may not need the options “–recheck” and “–nobootsector” but they will not do any harm either.

  1. Generate a new GRUB2 boot menu
# grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg
  1. Leave the changeroot environment
# exit
  1. Reboot your system
# init 6

Regards

susejunky

Sorry for an extreme late reply. A lot of personal, and career things to work out in between.

After speaking to IT at my institute, I decided to do a fresh re-install with /efi partition in Linux M2 SSD 174MB, while the W10 SSD is out. Playing it safe.
Now everything is working exactly the way I wish to. So he’s general outline of the partition table:
M2 with W10
-efi
-main
-recovery
M2 with LEAP 42.2
-efi
-swap
-/
SSHD
-1.5TB Windows dedicated
-0.5TB Shared

The issues is that I am used to having Linux install with swap and / only. This obviously is no longer the best way to do it, since it is not secure boot and efi compatible. I think in this case, my previous W7 and Linux install must’ve been done in LEGACY mode in other computer. I guess it is time to update these when I move onto new computers.

Now I will start a new thread to address couple of OpenSUSE LEAP 42.2 v.s. Alienware 15 issues. In particular, audio plug is a current issue. Nouveau seems to work very well with the GTX 970m.

On Sat 06 Jan 2018 05:26:02 PM CST, SJLPHI wrote:

Sorry for an extreme late reply. A lot of personal, and career things to
work out in between.

After speaking to IT at my institute, I decided to do a fresh re-install
with /efi partition in Linux M2 SSD 174MB, while the W10 SSD is out.
Playing it safe.
Now everything is working exactly the way I wish to.

Now I will start a new thread to address couple of OpenSUSE LEAP 42.2
v.s. Alienware 15 issues. In particular, audio plug is a current issue.
Nouveau seems to work very well with the GTX 970m.

Hi
You would have been better to install openSUSE Leap 42.3 as 42.2 goes
EOL in a few weeks…


Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE Leap 42.3|GNOME 3.20.2|4.4.104-39-default
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please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

Hello MalcolmLewis,

I actually tried LEAP 42.3 before, my experience was as bad as my first taste of LEAP 42.1 full of bugs, and needs a lot of patching. I think the absolute deal breaker was the constant 100% run of the tracker filling up the core dumps.

https://forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/527023-systemd-coredump-100-cpu-usage/page2

It seems that there has been non destructive solution of resetting the tracker, but I like to stay a few steps behind. I am still using W7Pro and OpenSUSE 13.2 on my backup laptop. I just want to fix the sound issue on the LEAP 42.2 and not touch it until I have to use linux.

Basically on both my backup laptop(toughbook cf-19 with i5-3210m) and alienware will use linux only as a last line of work on linux, but I still want everything to “work” but doesn’t need to be optimal. On my primary work laptop(Lenovo T430), that needs to stay on edge as well as being stable.

As for sound/headphone jack issue, it turns out that all I had to do was to open alsamixer as root then enable


'HP/Speaker Playback Switch'
'HP/Speaker Auto Detect Playback Switch'