alien --deb-to-rpm --scripts <package>.deb

This is a “why” rather than a “how”:

I use the very excellent Cherrytree (giuspen) as a note taker. This is available thru’ YaST but only as **0.28.5-2.1.2 **while the current release is **0.30.5-2 **and is, unfortunately, only available packaged as a .deb. I thought apper might be able to handle it but no - so I tried to download alien thru’ YaST - but alien is not available.

What is available is perl-alien-SDL & perl-alien-tidyp. Now the YaST description for perl-alien-SDL tells me that I should “—see the Alien manpage—” and its description for dpkg tells me “It makes it possible to create and extract Debian packages. If Alien is installed, the packages can be converted to RPMs.” - so SuSE knows about alien and has bits & pieces of it lying about the place. I spent many happy hours yesterday PM fooling about with yum, dpkg, apper Etc. without result.

In the end, I opened my old Dell Netbook running on antiX32 (a Debian based distro - also very excellent), ran the command which forms the title of this post, dumped the resulting .rpm in Dropbox - et voila:

dmk-SuSE.12.3 @ ~/Dropbox
Bash - 4.2.42: sudo zypper install cherrytree-0.30.5-2.noarch.rpm 
Loading repository data...
Reading installed packages...
Resolving package dependencies...

The following package is going to be upgraded:
  cherrytree 

The following package is going to change vendor:
  cherrytree  openSUSE -> 


1 package to upgrade, 1 to change vendor.
Overall download size: 547.0 KiB. After the operation, additional 613.4 KiB 
will be used.
Continue? [y/n/?] (y): y
Retrieving package cherrytree-0.30.5-2.noarch
                                           (1/1), 547.0 KiB (  1.8 MiB unpacked)
Retrieving package cherrytree-0.30.5-2.noarch
                                           (1/1), 547.0 KiB (  1.8 MiB unpacked)
(1/1) Installing: cherrytree-0.30.5-2 ....................................[done]

While working on this I found, from May 2013:

http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/applications/487207-possible-install-deb-format.html

OK, what I did was not difficult. The reason it took me so long was because I wanted it to work from within SuSE - when it didn’t I moved elsewhere. BUT, I am not a tyro (I hate that effing word “newbie” which always reminds me of the smarmy Italian “agent” from NCIS) and a newcomer, tyro or whatever (and, once upon time, we were all one of those) would have been defeated(?), discouraged(?) - you tell me.

And the question is “why”.

On Tue 17 Sep 2013 02:26:02 PM CDT, duncan mk wrote:

This is a “why” rather than a “how”:

I use the very excellent Cherrytree (‘giuspen’
(cherrytree – giuspen)) as a note taker. This is
available thru’ YaST but only as *0.28.5-2.1.2 *while the current
release is *0.30.5-2 *and is, unfortunately, only available packaged as
a .deb. I thought apper might be able to handle it but no - so I
tried to download alien thru’ YaST - but alien is not available.

Hi
‘Why’ not just grab from the development repository? GNOME:Apps…
http://software.opensuse.org/package/cherrytree?search_term=cherrytree

I don’t like using deb files, basically your taking a compiled binary
and plonking it on your system to the openSUSE file structure, no
security checks etc… not sure it even includes post/pre install
macros for example updating the menu database etc…


Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 12.3 (x86_64) GNOME 3.8.4 Kernel 3.7.10-1.16-desktop
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

‘Why’ not just grab from the development repository? GNOME:Apps…
http://software.opensuse.org/package…erm=cherrytree

the problem there is that the only release available from SuSE is 0.28.5-2.1.2 and I specifically wanted 0.30.5-2 (actually, the --scripts flag does run the various pre/post/etc scripts).

Thanks for the freply anyway

dmk

This is just my opinion, but I found it far easier to create an rpm from scratch than to worry about converting or installing a foreign package. Creating a package is pretty much as easy as bash.

The only time I would say to convert a package is if it is a proprietary program with no source to create your own rpm from. Though you might still be able to extract the deb, and create an rpm that manually installs the files in the correct place and permissions, but that might be advanced to do.

On Tue 17 Sep 2013 10:16:03 PM CDT, duncan mk wrote:

> ‘Why’ not just grab from the development repository? GNOME:Apps…
> ‘http://software.opensuse.org/package...erm=cherrytree
> (openSUSE Software)

the problem there is that the only release available from SuSE is
0.28.5-2.1.2 and I specifically wanted 0.30.5-2 (actually, the --scripts
flag does run the various pre/post/etc scripts).

Thanks for the freply anyway

dmk

Hi
Did you actually look in the GNOME:Apps repository (it’s the development
repos for cherrytree)?

GNOME:Apps = 0.30.5


Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 12.3 (x86_64) GNOME 3.8.4 Kernel 3.7.10-1.16-desktop
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

0.30.5 is available in GNOME:Apps, as Malcolm pointed out. Click “show unstable packages” to see the full list.

take another look
SUSE Paste

First I must apologise to martinlewis. I had followed his link to:

http://software.opensuse.org/package…erm=cherrytree

but hadn’t followed it thru’ “Show other versions” & “Show unstable packages”.

And second I must thank farcusnz for the SUSE Paste which led to me working out what I’d done wrong.

Thanks to all of you.

#dmk

On 2013-09-17 16:26, duncan mk wrote:
>
> This is a “why” rather than a “how”:
>
> - so I
> tried to download alien thru’ YaST - but alien is not available.

Of course it is available:


Telcontar:~ # cnf alien

The program 'alien' can be found in the following package:
* alien  path: /usr/bin/alien, repository: zypp (OBS_utilities) ]

Try installing with:
zypper install alien

Telcontar:~ #


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Now that is odd:

dmk-SuSE.12.3 @ ~
Bash - 4.2.42: cnf alien
alien: command not found                      
dmk-SuSE.12.3 @ ~

dmk

On 2013-09-18 13:16, duncan mk wrote:
>
> Now that is odd:
>
>
> Code:
> --------------------
> dmk-SuSE.12.3 @ ~
> Bash - 4.2.42: cnf alien
> alien: command not found
> dmk-SuSE.12.3 @ ~
> --------------------

Because you do not have the “OBS_utilities” repo, obviously. Did you use
the search facility at opensuse.org? I guess not, it is the first hit…
(click show unstable if it does not show).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

robin_listas - OK, I think I’m getting there slowly

So (it seems) it’s:

http://software.opensuse.org/package/alien?search_term=alien: (or whatever)
.|.
\ /
openSUSE Factory
openSUSE 12.3

Show unstable packages
     .|.
    \ /

system:packagemanager… 8.88… 32 Bit… 64 Bit Source… 1 Click Install

click on system:packagemanager to get here
.|.
\ /
openSUSE Build Service > Projects > system:packagemanager > alien

OR - select 32Bit, 64Bit or Source & go for “1 click Install”

Is this right?

Thanks for the help.

dmk

On 2013-09-18 22:36, duncan mk wrote:
> Is this right?

Yep :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Carlos - That’s great - thanks again.

But - although it answers the “how” it still seems a piece of rather convoluted arcana. It doesn’t answer the “why”.

dmk

On 2013-09-19 11:26, duncan mk wrote:
>
> Carlos - That’s great - thanks again.
>
> But - although it answers the “how” it still seems a piece of rather
> convoluted arcana. It doesn’t answer the “why”.

Why what?

I read the first post again, and I failed to understand the question.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

and from the original post:

OK, what I did was not difficult. The reason it took me so long was because I wanted it to work from within SuSE - when it didn’t I moved elsewhere. BUT, I am not a tyro (I hate that effing word “newbie” which always reminds me of the smarmy Italian “agent” from NCIS) and a newcomer, tyro or whatever (and, once upon time, we were all one of those) would have been defeated(?), discouraged(?) - you tell me.

Well, it’s sort of rhetorical now. I did what I wanted & used alien to achieve it (encountering some disapproval for doing so along the way) but, as I say i am not a tyro - I started on a Commodore PET, worked through DOS using Desqview & QEMM, dropped Windows for OS/2 and finally moved to Linux with SuSE 6.3 in about 1999. I have run the gamut of connectivity from dial-up modem to high speed, fibre optic cable.

I have never been more than an enthusiastic amateur (although, I have to say, I became world class with dBaseII & Wordperfect 5.1) and I have learned stuff from this post that I didn’t know - thanks to all of you - but it was a bit like “hunt the thimble”

And the question is “why”.

dmk

On 2013-09-20 13:56, duncan mk wrote:
>> And the question is “why”.

I’m sorry, I don’t understand a word. Long text, no explanation of
question. Somebody would be so kind to translate?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

I think I understand - why isn’t the latest greatest in the distro - easy it’s a “stable” release that was built some time ago and all will work together. That may not be the case even with show other versions but they are there to see if they are ok. Many applications updates have lib file updates as well and a single lib file may be used by any number of apps and some of those may not be happy with newer versions of the same file.

Personally the “stable” aspect is why I run OpenSuse but not Tumbleweed and tend to update shortly after the last release of a particular version. Or evergreen for that matter. Eventually applications will get ahead of the lib files it has unless some one does an awful lot of work.

In this case I don’t really see the problem. I download source and compile it if it if I am unhappy with the version or an OpenSuse release isn’t available. Just select package groups in YAST, select development and it indicates what is needed to compile from source. Most often 3 simple console commands are needed.

Extract the source file and open the console in the directory that it will create. Also worth checking the readme or install txt files just incase the install is done some other way - unusual. Instructions re what is needed for that will usually be given. Just click the compressed file which will open it in ark - the click the files to view them.

In the console type ./configure this will check if what the application needs is installed. If some are missing see if these can be found via YAST - package provides. If not Packman rpm but do install that with YAST as it will shout stinking fish if replacing something which another application needs. If that happens it’s best to forget trying to install the app.

Next command is make

The su to root and

make install

then su to user - well I do and tidy up in kde using su dolphin if needed.

Done apart from maybe having to find the application and creating or moving a desktop file. Start menu find files.

This way any bugs are likely to be down to the package as it’s using what it should. Things may not be so simple from the software search - show other versions. For instance I installed one a few months ago where poking around in it’s repository I found a comment - well at least it builds. It can take some time to find bugs in a package plus it’s associated files. I haven’t yet but some one posted one recently on here. There are several one click installs available for it now. Which one to use - part of the fun.

Downside - YAST etc can’t be used to uninstall but desktop entries and the file it points to can simply be deleted. No harm in leaving lib files as some other package may need them later. However when later installing an app with YAST it may want to install an earlier version - they can be deleted if that happens. That can happen if the new package is kept as well. All goes to show how much work our packagers put in all FOC. People may find they have to run the distro version at some point or not use the app that they are now trying to install later on.

git repositories can also be used to obtain what really is the latest source as well - sometimes a method used to get round commercial rights issues.

John

You could use “checkinstall” instead of “make install” (I’m not sure though if the package “checkinstall” is installed by default; you may have to install it manually). This would create an rpm which you can install and uninstall with the usual means (YaST, zypper, rpm).

On 2013-09-21 15:26, John 82 wrote:
>
> I think I understand - why isn’t the latest greatest in the distro -
> easy it’s a “stable” release that was built some time ago and all will
> work together.

Ah, I see. Thanks.

Yes, it is because of stability, it is not a rolling distro. It is an
openSUSE policy: a release does not get package upgrades after release,
only security updates, and some updates for major bugs. With a few
exceptions.

There is, of course, the OBS, where one may download newer versions. Or
you can build whatever yourself, as you explain.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)