42,2 boot fails on install reboot -- Plymouth core dumps

Hi:

I’ve installed 42.2, and the installation went Ok. However, when the system reboots, the Plymouth splash screen runs for a bit, then fails, and I drop into a terminal. I ran journalctl - xb which yielded:

<code>

plymouth-start .service core-dumped, status =11/SEGV

</code>

I see that Bug 1008489 was filed against plymouth for this behavior during 42.2 RC2 , but I do not see a fix or workaround in the bug reports. Zypper up reports that the latest plymouth is installed,

What can I do?

I am running Opensuse on a Gigabyte GA-787X-UD4H mobo, Intel I5 quad processor.

Thanks

Update: I’ve removed plymouth and its associated libraries via zypper. I edited /etc/default/grub and removed the splash entry, then ran “grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg”.
I rebooted, and once again dropped to a terminal. This time journalctl -xb yields: Emergency.service failed to step [sic] EXEC spawning /usr/bin/plymouth: no such file or directory.

And I still can’t get to the desktop.

That should have been: journalctl -xb yields: Emergency.service failed at step EXEC spawning /usr/bin/plymouth: no such file or directory.

Been staring at the monitor for too long

IMHO Plymouth is possibly not the issue here.

I have absolutely no idea what will happen if you remove Plymouth from an openSUSE system but, I suspect that in most cases it’s not a good idea: please consider the re-installation of the Plymouth packages – possibly the following list taken on this 13.2 system: plymouth, plymouth-branding-openSUSE, plymouth-dracut, plymouth-plugin-script, plymouth-scripts.

You should also check the status of the Plymouth services in systemd: root user CLI: “# systemctl list-unit-files” – “systemd-ask-password-plymouth.path”, “plymouth-halt.service”, “plymouth-kexec.service”, “plymouth-poweroff.service”, “plymouth-quit-wait.service”, “plymouth-quit.service”, “plymouth-read-write.service”, “plymouth-reboot.service”, “plymouth-start.service”, “plymouth-switch-root.service” and “systemd-ask-password-plymouth.service”.

Given that, you’re only seeing a (VT) Terminal session after the boot completes, you should, with the user “root”, check the systemd status of the “display-manager.service”.
With a 13.2 KDE Plasma 4 system it looks like this (with Plymouth entries and several user logins by several different users):


 # LANG=C systemctl status -l display-manager.service
display-manager.service - X Display Manager
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/display-manager.service; enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Fri 2016-12-30 08:30:57 CET; 12h ago
  Process: 1713 ExecStart=/usr/lib/X11/display-manager start (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 1778 (kdm)
   CGroup: /system.slice/display-manager.service
           ├─ 1778 /usr/bin/kdm
           └─15201 /usr/bin/Xorg -br :0 vt7 -nolisten tcp -seat seat0 -auth /var/lib/kdm/AuthFiles/A:0-KxcKxb

Dec 30 11:20:39 eck001 kdm[1778]: Quitting Plymouth with transition
Dec 30 11:20:39 eck001 kdm[1778]: Is Plymouth still running? no
Dec 30 11:20:48 eck001 kdm[13918]: :0[13918]: pam_unix(xdm:session): session opened for user xxx by (uid=0)
Dec 30 11:35:34 eck001 kdm[1778]: plymouth should quit after server startup
Dec 30 11:35:35 eck001 kdm[1778]: Quitting Plymouth with transition
Dec 30 11:35:35 eck001 kdm[1778]: Is Plymouth still running? no
Dec 30 11:35:48 eck001 kdm[15206]: :0[15206]: pam_unix(xdm:session): session opened for user yyy by (uid=0)
Dec 30 19:18:05 eck001 kdm_config[7813]: Multiple occurrences of section [General] in /usr/share/kde4/config/kdm/kdmrc. Consider merging them.
Dec 30 19:18:05 eck001 kdm_config[7813]: Multiple occurrences of section [Xdmcp] in /usr/share/kde4/config/kdm/kdmrc. Consider merging them.
Dec 30 19:18:12 eck001 kdm[7826]: :1[7826]: pam_unix(xdm:session): session opened for user zzz by (uid=0)
 # 

Right you were, my friend. It wasn’t Plymouth at all. I went back a looked a little more closely at the output of journalctl -xb and found some problems with the /home file system (“Dependency failed” error). I ran fsck on the fs, fixed the errors, and rebooted. Voila, KDE in all its glory. Thank you very much for responding to my query. And have a Happy and Safe New Year.

Steve

There is no problem with removing Plymouth.

I prefer watching the boot-up text scrolling up the screen, find it much more fascinating and impressive, you can see openSUSE doing the work.

Looks way cooler than the Plymouth boot splashes, and actually speeds up boot time.

So, I have not had Plymouth installed (actually, I have removed Plymouth) in the past several openSUSE versions.

The only reason that I keep Plymouth, is that it has a nicer interface for providing the encryption key with an encrypted disk (encrypted LVM). Apart from that, there are no benefits. All it does is hide the various bootup messages, and personally I prefer to see those messages.