[12.3] swap partition not visible

The swap partition is not visible, not while installation, and not after that.

Why is that? Because system locks it or something?

Post result from the installed system

su -
parted -l

Is it present in /etc/fstab? :\

cat /etc/fstab

What do you expect to be “vissible”. A light emiting part of the disk flickering when it revolves? :sarcastic:

You should realy not write down the conclusion you jumped to, but the exact observation you did.

Now several people have offered you several statements that will highlight several pieces of information about an eventual Swap partotion and I can give you another one

/usr/sbin/swapon -s

But when you would have told what you are “looking at” when you are “not seeing it”, that would have been more efficient.

On 2013-04-03 06:56, AnthraxThrash wrote:
>
> The swap partition is not visible, not while installation, and not after
> that.

Not visible where exactly?
What program or component are you using to try see it?

Please explain.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Sorry, folks, the topic lacks description, I admit that.

During the process of installation the component is called “Edit partition table…”. When using fully deployed system - it’s Partitioner. Those two only display NTFS and EXT4 partitions.

@hcvv
@PiElle
@caf4926

I will be able to run the commands you have kindly provided me with only by this evening.

On 2013-04-03 14:16, AnthraxThrash wrote:
>
> Sorry, folks, the topic lacks description, I admit that.
>
> During the process of installation the component is called “Edit
> partition table…”. When using fully deployed system - it’s
> Partitioner. Those two only display NTFS and EXT4 partitions.
>
> @hcvv
> @PiElle
> @caf4926
>
> I will be able to run the commands you have kindly provided me with
> only by this evening.

Maybe you can also post a screenshot at susepaste.org of the partitioner
showing the issue.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Sure, later I can do that too.

Well, I have to admit, that I don’t have swap partition at all…

# parted -l
Model: ATA WDC WD5002AALX-0 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 500GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End    Size    Type     File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  106MB  105MB   primary  ntfs         type=07
 2      106MB   107GB  107GB   primary  ntfs         type=07
 3      107GB   193GB  85.9GB  primary  ext4         boot, type=83
 4      193GB   500GB  307GB   primary  ntfs         type=07
# cat /etc/fstab
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD5002AALX-00J37A0_WD-WCAYUCY31455-part3 /                    ext4       acl,user_xattr        1 1
proc                 /proc                proc       defaults              0 0
sysfs                /sys                 sysfs      noauto                0 0
debugfs              /sys/kernel/debug    debugfs    noauto                0 0
usbfs                /proc/bus/usb        usbfs      noauto                0 0
devpts               /dev/pts             devpts     mode=0620,gid=5       0 0
# /usr/sbin/swapon -s
Filename                                Type            Size    Used    Priority

I don’t know how the hell this hapened, because I never install linux without swap…

I guess the topic could be closed, and my system reinstalled :frowning:

Hi
Because you have used all 4 partitions…

sda3 needs to be created as an extended partition for the linux install on sda5 etc.

Agreed

Solution is delete partition 3 of the parted list
Recreate a extended partition to fill that same space and then create logical partitions inside it
swap = or up to 2 x RAM
ext4 for / of 20GB
ext4 for /home to use all the remainder

# parted -l
Model: ATA WDC WD5002AALX-0 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 500GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End    Size    Type     File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  106MB  105MB   primary  ntfs         type=07
 2      106MB   107GB  107GB   primary  ntfs         type=07
 3      107GB   193GB  85.9GB  primary  ext4         boot, type=83
 4      193GB   500GB  307GB   primary  ntfs         type=07

I prefer to delete sda3 and sda4.

sda3 is linux “domain”, while sda4 is windows storage partition. Due to low storage usage, I can backup all the data somewhere else and repartition it.

What’s the best way to partition the drive? I thought of something like this :

sda1 PRIMARY (leave as is - hidden windows boot partition)
sda2 PRIMARY (leave as is - windows system partition)
sda3 PRIMARY (linux root and home folders)

[Extended starts here]
sda4 LINUX-SWAP (2*RAM)
sda5 LOGICAL (windows NTFS storage)

So far I’m not sure, should I make swap primary, instead of linux root…

On 2013-04-04 09:26, AnthraxThrash wrote:

> What’s the best way to partition the drive? I thought of something like
> this :
>
> Code:
> --------------------
> sda1 PRIMARY (leave as is - hidden windows boot partition)
> sda2 PRIMARY (leave as is - windows system partition)
> sda3 PRIMARY (linux root and home folders)
>
> [Extended starts here]
> sda4 LINUX-SWAP (2*RAM)
> sda5 LOGICAL (windows NTFS storage)
> --------------------

Fine. Huh, no, there is a mistake above:

sda4 would be primary extended, sda5 (swap) and sda6 logicals.

On the other hand, another partition for /home is a benefit: when you
install the next version in a year or so, you only format and overwrite
root, and keep home with your data.

> So far I’m not sure, should I make swap primary, instead of linux
> root…

No, typically you make root a primary partition because you can mark it
bootable so that a generic MBR can start the system. It also works with
extended, but swap would not work.

Alternative is to install grub on the MBR, then you can do whatever you
like. The snag is that applying Windows service packs became a problem
if the MBR is not the one from Windows, and the windows partition is not
marked bootable.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Like this?

sda1 PRIMARY NTFS (leave as is - hidden windows boot partition) ~100MB
sda2 PRIMARY NTFS (leave as is - windows system partition) ~100GB
sda3 PRIMARY EXT4 linux-root ~20GB

sda4 PRIMARY EXTENDED 
  sda5 linux-swap (2*RAM) ~4GB
  sda6 EXT4 /home ~60GB
  sda7 LOGICAL (windows NTFS storage)

On 2013-04-04 11:26, AnthraxThrash wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2544362 Wrote:

> Like this?
>
> Code:
> --------------------
> sda1 PRIMARY NTFS (leave as is - hidden windows boot partition) ~100MB
> sda2 PRIMARY NTFS (leave as is - windows system partition) ~100GB
> sda3 PRIMARY EXT4 linux-root ~20GB
>
> sda4 PRIMARY EXTENDED
> sda5 linux-swap (2*RAM) ~4GB
> sda6 EXT4 /home ~60GB
> sda7 LOGICAL (windows NTFS storage)
> --------------------

Yes, that looks fine to me.

If it were me, though, I usually create another Linux partition, like 7
or 8 GiB, that I use to test installation of the next version of the
distribution, or even factory. It is also useful if the main Linux
partition fails to boot, or for doing backups.

But your disk space seems to be a bit limited.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

It looks basically OK to me

Not really, my drive has total of 500GB, but I’ll stick to the last partition mapping.

Thank you)

On 2013-04-04 12:16, AnthraxThrash wrote:
>
> Not really, my drive has total of 500GB, but I’ll stick to the last
> partition mapping.

That’s the same as my laptop. But my Windows side is smaller.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

New issue with Partitioner:

I have started building partition setup discussed in the previous posts. When I got to Extended partition, the problem began:

when I click on extended partition in order to create child sub-partitions - **there is no option to do that. **

Sorry, I may have left this for some time, but you telling this gives almost noinformation.

What is “the Partitioner”. There are many of them, starting with my beloved fdisk, foinf through other usefull CLI tools, then there are many GUI programs interfacing to partitioning, ending up in combined partitioning and file system management programs.

My first reaction to such a problem is always: show what the computer says about what you have now:

fdisk -l