11.4 shutting down due to overheating since recenlty

Since two weeks ago, 11.4 started shutting down due to critical temperature (91 C) soon after boot. While I try to overheat it in windows, playing a game in extremely hot room, it never reached 86 C on any core.

Now, since I don’t have time enough to discover is anything really spiking processors on 100% (because it shuts down quickly), I wonder could this come from some update, some bug, erroneous reading of temperature or what else.
It does not “overheat” in text mode.

Any sugestions? (like downloading and compiling new kernel etc)?

Actually, it does overheat. I noticed spike on core 3 to 98 C.
I wonder what can make it overheat so quickly?
Problem does not occur when using Windows 7.

Actually, it does overheat. I noticed spike on core 3 to 98 C.
I wonder what can make it overheat so quickly?
Problem does not occur when using Windows 7.

  1. So, to make sure Windows does work, I would boot into Windows, right after the over heat occurs and see if Windows indeed keeps working for an hour at least.
  2. If this is not a real new Laptop, I would consider buying a can of duster and blowing out all cooling vents. Dust buildup can astound you. If Windows is better at running the CPU fan, it may hang in there longer, even with a dust build-up.
  3. Have you seen or tried the power saving kernel setting that help reduce power and heat build up? The kernel load option to add is: **pcie_aspm=force **and is supposed to reduce power usage by up to 15%.
  4. Have you seen my blog on setting the YaST CPU power control setting here: YaST Power Management - Control Your CPU Energy Usage How To & FAQ - Blogs - openSUSE Forums
  5. Have y0ou see my blog on manual settings of your CPU speed here: C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - Version 1.10 - For use with the cpufrequtils package - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

It is possible that some combination of the above items might help improve your situation.

Thank You,

Thanks a lot!

Since I could not open laptop without force, I gave up and screwed it shut back. But I did blew through openings and it seems to have resolved a problem as temp dropped to avg 61 C

What I notice is that W7 does reduce the clock when temp starts to rise to critical. OpenSUSE did not, and I didn’t tamper with kernel at all this time.

Thanks a lot!
Since I could not open laptop without force, I gave up and screwed it shut back. But I did blew through openings and it seems to have resolved a problem as temp dropped to avg 61 C

What I notice is that W7 does reduce the clock when temp starts to rise to critical. OpenSUSE did not, and I didn’t tamper with kernel at all this time.

                                                                                  You did not indicate if you tried using the bash script file cfu:

C.F.U. - CPU Frequency Utilitiy - Version 1.10 - For use with the cpufrequtils package - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

You can use it to set your CPU clock speed Governor to Conservative, which keeps your CPU at a slow speed for a while unless something serious comes along needing more power. This can then reduce the overall heat created. As for the dust spray, it does make a big difference, even for Windows and is highly recommended to anyone who reads this message.

Thank You,

No, did not try the script, but I will… however, now is working properly. Yea… dust spray is mandatory from now on :slight_smile:

No, did not try the script, but I will… however, now is working properly. Yea… dust spray is mandatory from now on :slight_smile:

I am very happy that using the duster spray cleared out the dust in your laptop which was causing the over heating and allowed your laptop to work. I am also happy you aborted taking your laptop apart as that was not a suggestion. Its possible to do more harm than good when taking many laptops apart. This problem (of over heating due to dust build up) really came home to me many moons ago when my two year old Dell work laptop actually came up and said it was shutting down due to over heating. I keep a can of duster spray in my bag of tricks, I pulled the laptop from the docking station and blasted the air through the vents and the first cloud of dust nearly choked me. I remember just looking at it thinking that this is simply not possible. I must admit having worked at a construction site where the dust was almost unbearable and perhaps this is where the real bad buildup occurred. Even so, I now give it a blast a couple of times a year and always see a small dust cloud emerge. Take it from me, that it never hurts to clear out that dust when you have the opportunity to do so. Also, I would really love to hear that you gave the cfu bash script file a try. It is helpful to know it works on a wide variety of computers. You would be helping me out to do so, if you have the time.

Thank You,

I was having a similar problem a few months ago, It was my graphics card that overheated. Maybe this is the same case.

Doesnt hurt to try that first