10 reasons why you must try using linux

Hi all,

After a long time span I have come to this forum.Hope someone of you still remember me.

I have been a member of many forums but really this one is my favorite.

All members and moderators here are friendly,social and helpful.

So I come to the topic,I have posted an article in my blog related to the advantages of linux to help newbies who are all used to windows.

The blog post is located here 10 reasons why you must try using linux - Sync With Tech

All I need is your suggestion.

Is the post perfect?? Should I add something to that article to make the post most valuable???

Please take time to scan that article and give me your priceless suggestions…

*You can delete windows viruses without any antivirus software

*You never need any drivers or software to get connected to your devices

*There is no need for Internet security or firewalls

You might want to reconsider these especially. The accuracy of those statements may though be impaired by Language, if it is the case that English isn’t your mother tongue?

Yes, I do. But not well enough to remember whether the past experience was good.

So you came back to spam our forum with a link to your blog :stuck_out_tongue:

There’s no such thing as a perfect blog post. Some readers will find it useful. Others won’t.

In any case, I have added your blog to my RSS reader (to akregator).

On Mon, 04 Nov 2013 19:16:02 +0000, vike4 wrote:

> Is the post perfect??

Not really, no. It’s a good effort, but there are many problems with the
post - both in terms of content, and in terms of formatting, structure,
and use of language (though I understand and appreciate that English may
not be your first language). Don’t take this feedback as “raining on
your parade” - take it as constructive feedback on the post.

From a content standpoint:

#10 - not the best way of dealing with “Windows viruses”. Windows
viruses can infect other parts of a device. You might also accidentally
remove something you need - I would never suggest blanket deleting all
executable files. (What’s more, that won’t deal with macro viruses). I
would be more inclined to use ClamAV to scan files rather than just
deleting files that seem suspicious.

#9 - All hardware uses drivers of some sort. Much of the time, the
necessary kernel modules are included in a Linux distribution, but
sometimes they’re not. Sometimes hardware just isn’t supported at all
(Winmodems frequently aren’t, for example).

#8 - Sure, it can be used as a recovery tool. That’s not necessarily a
reason to try Linux, though - if all you’re using it for is to recover an
unbootable Windows system, most users are going to struggle with using
unfamiliar tools. Learning a new tool while trying to recover a system
is a poor way to learn the tool, and usually leads to frustration on the
part of the user - especially a non-technical user.

#7 - Absolutely, positively untrue. Sorry, but on a Linux system you
should always use a firewall. That’s a security best practice, and
suggesting that you can do away with a firewall “because it’s Linux and
therefore can’t be compromised” is naïve at best and dangerous advice at
worst.

#6 - I don’t see how this is a “reason to try using Linux” - yes, there’s
choice, but for many people, too much choice isn’t a good thing. People
then start asking questions like “should I install Ubuntu, openSUSE,
Fedora, Scientific Linux, Puppy Linux, Gentoo - or what?” I’m not saying
choice is a /bad/ thing, but for many people, choice leads to
uncertainty. People should try what they want to try, but having a
number of different distributions available isn’t a way to do a needs
analysis.

#5 - vi is not for beginners. 'nuff said. :wink: Well, other than I
wouldn’t use it to manage a large software project with multiple source
files.

#4 - Sure, you can use wine or commercial solutions like Crossover
Office. You can also virtualize Windows using VirtualBox, KVM, VMware,
qemu, or a number of other solutions. Trying Linux “because you can even
run Windows software” is kinda like saying you should drive on the
freeway because your car can handle surface streets. Of course it’s
true, but it’s not a compelling reason to try Linux.

#3 - Linux crashes, just as other systems crash. I’ve dealt with kernel
panics. They’re not as frequent, but they do happen - to present Linux
as a system that “never crashes” is inaccurate. Your evidence is
anecdotal, which is not the singular form of the word “data” (as a friend
of mine at Google is fond of saying). You may have only had to deal with
one or two crashes - and you’ve probably done a good job of picking
hardware that’s compatible. I’ve seen Windows systems run for years (in
production environments) without crashing, and I’ve seen Linux systems
have to be rebuilt/reinstalled because of data corruption. System
failures are a part of IT life. Rather than suggest that Linux doesn’t
crash (and have the unwritten suggestion that that means you don’t need
to do DR planning) is dangerous.

#2 - There certainly are open source alternatives for lots of commercial
applications. There also are areas where there aren’t good open source
alternatives because of project requirements. This is, though, a good
reason to look at Linux and to try out open source alternatives. Some
are as good or better, others not so much - just like commercial
software. I am a professional writer, and I use FrameMaker for most of
my work. Word is a poor substitute for the kind of work I do in
FrameMaker. But so are the open source DITA-compliant tools, because
projects I work on have needs that FrameMaker fills (and it’s part of the
workflow/publication process). So this is something of a variation of
#6, and thus there are similar problems to it. And there aren’t open
source alternatives for every application (and even when there are, the
OSS alternative may not be “good enough”) - that claim is not really
accurate. Saying that GIMP is a good enough OSS alternative to PhotoShop,
for example depends a lot on the user. For some people (myself included)
it is, but if you need higher-bits-per-color support, GIMP either doesn’t
have it or (possibly) it’s only recently been added.

#1 - Not everyone likes using the shell, and it can be intimidating for
new users. There /is/ a lot of power in using a shell (or writing
scripts in python, perl, php, awk, etc - and I’ve used all of those at
some point or another). That’s not unique to Linux, though. Windows now
has Powershell, which is actually pretty powerful. But I remember also
doing fairly complex things with custom C code and batch files on DOS/
Windows.

I’ve been using Linux since about 1998 myself. It’s always evolving and
always changing. The rapid release cycles are generally a good thing,
but that’s a matter of preference. I tend to install every other release
of openSUSE on my systems, and I use it daily for production work (though
my FrameMaker stuff is in a VirtualBox VM because Frame just won’t run on
WINE).

From a language/editing/audience perspective, some things to look for:

  1. Spaces after punctuation. Commas, periods, exclamation marks, etc -
    all get at least one space (some standards say one space after a period,
    some say two at the end of a sentence).

  2. You haven’t really defined your target audience well. You talk about
    some things that might be good for “noobs” (I would also avoid using
    colloquialisms in a post like that, but that’s a personal preference),
    but then suggest that CLI work and the ability to use vi (but no mention
    of other excellent editors better suited for new users - like nano or
    joe), which are really topics for a more advanced audience.

  3. You suggest Linux Mint (note the spelling/capitalization - that is
    important, just as it’s “openSUSE” and not “OpenSuSE” or “OpenSUSE”.


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

It’s already 03.23 here. Feeling sleepy…

I will post proper replies within 10 hours…

I have been given what I asked for that’s why I choose openSUSE forum…

See you all in 10 hours…

Yes, English isn’t my mother tongue. If you are interested, correct those sentences. What should I use instead of those sentences you mentioned?

Thanks for your valuable feedback Caf…

I don’t think so. Remember it’s a general chit-chat sub forum. I will ask anything to my friends. Don’t you…?

If they considered my post as a spam, this thread would be dumped. But look at the massive response from one of the administrators…

Have you added my blog to your RSS??? :open_mouth:

I don’t deserve that I’m just a beginner in blogging…

@hendersj

First of all, thanks for your marvelous feedback. Now I have realized I’m not mature enough to publish this kind of blogpost. I must learn a lot before publishing every post. I also lag in formatting & use of language. So, I must learn something regarding content formatting.Sure, English is not my first language I’ll try to improve it in future. I learned a lot from your reply. I’m really thankful to you. I might not have this golden opportunity (reading your feedback). If I post it in other forums.

Once again Thanks for everything…

I’ll follow it for a while. Then I can just as easily delete it, if I don’t find it worth following – “akregator” does most of the work, anyway.

On Mon, 04 Nov 2013 20:00:23 +0000, Jim Henderson wrote:

> #5 - vi is not for beginners. 'nuff said. :wink: Well, other than I
> wouldn’t use it to manage a large software project with multiple source
> files.

Also, to this point, on Windows, nobody uses Turbo-C any more for serious
development or learning to program in C. I used to sell Turbo-C when I
worked in software sales - in 1987!

Microsoft Visual Studio is the tool of choice for developers on the
Windows platform these days. Comparing vi to MVS is like comparing a
dishwasher to a Ferrari - you can’t even compare them, because as tools,
they’re dedicated to entirely different purposes and functions.

Drawing false equivalencies doesn’t help make he case that people should
use Linux - what it does is make people think that those of us who use
Linux don’t really understand the state of computing, or even how to
select a proper tool for the job.

I mean, sure, I could use “cat > file.txt” to create a C source file.
Would I, when I could use a tool like Komodo Edit? (or pay for a tool
like Komodo IDE, for that matter?) No, I’d use the best tool for the job.

And that’s what it comes down to. I use Linux myself because it’s the
best tool for the job for the majority of what I use a computer for. I
maintain some Windows VMs for the tools that I use that require Windows,
because the tool that is the best for the job in those instances is
something that runs on Windows.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

On Tue, 05 Nov 2013 16:21:34 +0000, vike4 wrote:

> @hendersj
>
> First of all, thanks for your marvelous feedback. Now I have realized
> I’m not mature enough to publish this kind of blogpost. I must learn a
> lot before publishing every post. I also lag in formatting & use of
> language. So, I must learn something regarding content formatting.Sure,
> English is not my first language I’ll try to improve it in future. I
> learned a lot from your reply. I’m really thankful to you. I might not
> have this golden opportunity (reading your feedback). If I post it in
> other forums.
>
> Once again Thanks for everything…

I’m glad I could provide you with feedback you found useful - don’t be
discouraged! :slight_smile:

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C