1 USB Stick with 2 seperate disks, Any possiblity to merge it?

I have a USB Stick, that have 2 separate disks.
Here is the upper right DropDown Box of GParted.


/dev/sda (149.05 GiB)
/dev/sdb (149.05 GiB)
/dev/sdc (3.83 GiB)
/dev/sdd (2.00 MiB)

I colored the entries. as you can see sdc and sdd are on the same USB flash drive! NO 2 SEPERATE USB DRIVES!!
it is possibly to merge the two disk drive, to a one disk drive

never seen that before, but as for linux you could set up an Logical Volume Managment (LVM). however, this will not be readable by windows.

wikipedia on LVM/url

Try deleting the partitions and recreating a single new partition.

They aren’t partitions, else they would have been sdc1 and sdc2 (not sdc and sdd).

Can we have the listing of

lsusb

so we can see what the system thinks those USB device(s) is/are?

BTW, next time you want to show what disks there are and how they are partitioned, use

fdisk -l

An d please do that also, so we can see all the partition tables and not the disks only.

lsusb
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 04f2:b008 Chicony Electronics Co., Ltd USB 2.0 Camera
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 05e3:0608 Genesys Logic, Inc. USB-2.0 4-Port HUB
Bus 002 Device 004: ID 04d9:048e Holtek Semiconductor, Inc. Optical Mouse
Bus 001 Device 010: ID 19b6:4096 Infotech Logistic, LLC
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 152e:1640 LG (HLDS)

–and—

fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sdc: 4110 MB, 4110417920 bytes
127 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders, total 8028160 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/sdc doesn’t contain a valid partition table [NOTE: the partition table is [b]bsd, with a jfs and fat32 partition]

Disk /dev/sdd: 2 MB, 2097152 bytes
1 heads, 1 sectors/track, 4096 cylinders, total 4096 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x6037b403

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 4095 2047+ e W95 FAT16 (LBA)

Hm, you posted in your first post above some listing between CODE tags. To me that means that you know that they exist, what they are for and how to use them. Why didn’t you post the output above between CODE tags? Now the lay-out is ruined and we can train our eyes on finding out where columns start and stop.

Second is that you did not post from prompt until prompt (that means including the prompt, the command you gave, the answer rom the system and the new prompt). It is as easy to copy/paste the complete action as it is to copy/paste only a part of it. Thus there is no extra effort asked from you to do show the complete thing. I guess that you also omitted the output about sda and sdb. That might be harmless, but at least tell us what you left out.

Third is that I have the strong feeling that you did not tell us all you know about that device. As it is now, sdc apperently is used earlier on a BSD system and is about 4 Gbyte. sdd is only 2 Mbytes. What is the drive behind your effort to add those two Mbyte to the other 4 Gbyte, an increase of ½ promille! The administration that is to be used to achieve this might easily eat half of that amount. What is the gain?

BTW I admit that I can not decide which is your device from the lsusb listing. Maybe you can. You should at least know what the maker of the device is and probably it’s type. Another thing you keep secret from us.

You can’t merge them. They are separate “disks”. And why bother with a piddly 2MB, as hcvv points out?

There are quite a few of these USB devices around with two devices. In the past, a common configuration was a second “floppy” device. Currently it’s popular to use a second device to hold encrypting or backup software.