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Thread: Install on USB-stick used in different hardware - no access to Bootloader in YaST

  1. #21

    Default Re: Install on USB-stick used in different hardware - no access to Bootloader in YaST

    Just one more thing: The older USB-stick (used with this install from 2020 up to a few days ago) is very, very, very slow with read-write (opening applications, installing updates).

    Would it help to safe the install (dd), create a new partition table and dd over the install again to improve read-write speed? Or is the USB-stick physically worn out after frequent zypper dups on the install?
    Kind regards

    raspu

  2. #22
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Install on USB-stick used in different hardware - no access to Bootloader in YaST

    Quote Originally Posted by suse_rasputin View Post
    ... The older USB-stick (used with this install from 2020 up to a few days ago) is very, very, very slow with read-write (opening applications, installing updates).

    Would it help to safe the install (dd), create a new partition table and dd over the install again to improve read-write speed? Or is the USB-stick physically worn out after frequent zypper dups on the install?
    Due to the fact that an USB-Stick is a memory device (and not a rotating disk) I doubt that you will gain much read/write speed by "re-arranging" the content.

    I have used openSUSE installations from a range of different external devices (like LIVE-CDs/DVDs; installations on USB2.0-memory-sticks, on USB2.0-HDDs, on USB3.0-memory-sticks, on USB3.0-NVMes). A rescue system on an USB3.0-memory stick is usable but not really fun. If you need a system for your day-to-day work then an USB3.0-NVMe is ideal.

    Regards

    susejunky

  3. #23
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Install on USB-stick used in different hardware - no access to Bootloader in YaST

    Quote Originally Posted by susejunky View Post
    I have used openSUSE installations from a range of different external devices (like LIVE-CDs/DVDs; installations on USB2.0-memory-sticks, on USB2.0-HDDs, on USB3.0-memory-sticks, on USB3.0-NVMes). A rescue system on an USB3.0-memory stick is usable but not really fun. If you need a system for your day-to-day work then an USB3.0-NVMe is ideal.
    A properly installed x86_64 system will boot and run on pretty much every piece of x86_64 hardware attached through almost every interface providing some reasonable transfer rate. However performance varies vastly due to IOPS obtained. USB is notoriously poor in this regard.
    Code:
    6700K:~ # inxi -D 
    Drives:
      Local Storage:total: 4.1 TiB used: 3.27 TiB (79.8%) 
      ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Samsung model: SSD 850 EVO 500GB size: 465.76 GiB 
      ID-2: /dev/sdb vendor: Western Digital model: WD40EZRX-22SPEB0 size: 3.64 TiB 
      ID-3: /dev/sdc type: USB vendor: Generic model: Flash Disk size: 3.85 GiB 
    6700K:~ #
    Performance of Tumbleweed sitting on the 850 EVO is amazing with the drive being attached to the mainboard through a proper SATA cable. Running it over any USB cable is plain and utter PITA.

    BTW: erlangen's rescue system sits on its main drive:
    Code:
    erlangen:~ # inxi -Dy 132 
    Drives:    Local Storage:total: 10.92 TiB used: 1.8 TiB (16.5%) 
               ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 vendor: Samsung model: SSD 970 EVO Plus 2TB size: 1.82 TiB 
               ID-2: /dev/sda vendor: Seagate model: ST8000VN004-2M2101 size: 7.28 TiB 
               ID-3: /dev/sdb vendor: Crucial model: CT2000BX500SSD1 size: 1.82 TiB 
    erlangen:~ #
    Code:
    erlangen:~ # fdisk -l /dev/nvme0n1 
    Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 1.82 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
    Disk model: Samsung SSD 970 EVO Plus 2TB             
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes 
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes 
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes 
    Disklabel type: gpt 
    Disk identifier: F5B232D0-7A67-461D-8E7D-B86A5B4C6C10 
    
    Device             Start       End   Sectors SizeType
    /dev/nvme0n1p1       2048    1050623    1048576  512M EFI System 
    /dev/nvme0n1p2    1050624 3804628991 3803578368  1.8T Linux filesystem 
    /dev/nvme0n1p3 3804628992 3907029134  102400143 48.8G Linux filesystem 
    erlangen:~ #
    openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma, Blogs/KeepItSimple, i7-6700K (2016), i5-8250U (2018), AMD Ryzen 5 3400G (2020), 5600X, 5700U (2022)

  4. #24

    Default Re: Install on USB-stick used in different hardware - no access to Bootloader in YaST

    Yeah, interesting discussion. I use the sticks mostly to boot a random piece of hardware without opening any covers etc. Or as a cheap source for the OS on rarely needed hardware.

    RE: lousy performance of old USB-stick

    Believe it or not: At some point in the past I had enabled persistent logs on the older USB-stick (sudo mkdir /var/log/journal) and after removing this directory the stick boots again in about 9 sec with TW, just as the new stick (systemd-analyze blame). And apps are loading adequately fast.

    I have no idea why the new stick with the same persistent log had no problems with performance in the first place, but I removed the /journal directory even for this stick, just to be on the safe side...
    Kind regards

    raspu

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