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Thread: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

  1. #1

    Default How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    I have a laptop with a small ssd drive and would like to install tumbleweed but with ext4 instead of btrfs and timeshift for the "snapshots" to a large external usb drive (4tb).

    The problem is that since the ssd is small on 256gb, the root partition is only 24gb and the snapshots/subvolumes will quickly crash the root partition.

    I've googled (startpage.com) around and not found and write-ups on how to set rsync/timeshift for tumbleweed with ext4.

    Any suggestion?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Quote Originally Posted by elfroggio View Post
    I have a laptop with a small ssd drive and would like to install tumbleweed but with ext4 instead of btrfs and timeshift for the "snapshots" to a large external usb drive (4tb).

    The problem is that since the ssd is small on 256gb, the root partition is only 24gb and the snapshots/subvolumes will quickly crash the root partition.

    I've googled (startpage.com) around and not found and write-ups on how to set rsync/timeshift for tumbleweed with ext4.

    Any suggestion?

    Thanks
    Hi
    Disable snapshots and use btrfs (that's what I have here, but 60GB / with 18GB allocated)? If want to use ext4, then during install use the expert partitioner option to configure as required with partition sizes and file system to use in the dropdowns.
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
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    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmlewis View Post
    Hi
    Disable snapshots and use btrfs (that's what I have here, but 60GB / with 18GB allocated)? If want to use ext4, then during install use the expert partitioner option to configure as required with partition sizes and file system to use in the dropdowns.
    I have used the expert partitioner before with leap. My question (not expressed clearly) is:

    1. I still want the equivalent of the snapshots in tw but
    2. with ext4 and timeshift

    After I finish my install, do I just install timeshift & run it before doing the zypper -dup?

    That way, I could rollback if there's a major problem that affects me?

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Timeshift is not the same as snapper. Time shift is a backup scheme, snapper is a sort of like a dif and not a full backup. There are definite differences.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Why not go with the default install with btrfs using the entire disk? Then you won't have to worry about snapshots using too much space. You can use rsync, rsnapshot, restic, etc. to back up what you want.

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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Quote Originally Posted by elfroggio View Post
    The problem is that since the ssd is small on 256gb, the root partition is only 24gb and the snapshots/subvolumes will quickly crash the root partition.
    Use the expert partitioner to make the sizes you wish, or partition in advance, selecting only what to mount where and whether and how to partition in the openSUSE installer. Make / at least 40GB, better 50 or 60 if you're going to stick with BTRFS for /.
    Reg. Linux User 211409 *** multibooting since 1992
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Quote Originally Posted by elfroggio View Post
    I have a laptop with a small ssd drive and would like to install tumbleweed but with ext4 instead of btrfs and timeshift for the "snapshots" to a large external usb drive (4tb). The problem is that since the ssd is small on 256gb, the root partition is only 24gb and the snapshots/subvolumes will quickly crash the root partition. I've googled (startpage.com) around and not found and write-ups on how to set rsync/timeshift for tumbleweed with ext4.
    This is a bad idea, in my opinion of course! Host 6700K boots into Tumbleweed, which sits on a Crucial SSD, model: CT250MX500SSD1, size: 232.89 GiB:
    Code:
    6700K:~ # fdisk -l /dev/sdb                
    Disk /dev/sdb: 232.89 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
    Disk model: CT250MX500SSD1   
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes 
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes 
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes 
    Disklabel type: gpt 
    Disk identifier: 3B04C452-DAD9-45C6-9BD3-AE398288F628 
    
    Device        Start      End  Sectors  SizeType
    /dev/sdb1       2048   1026047   1024000   500M EFI System 
    /dev/sdb2    1026048 283596799 282570752 134.7G Linux filesystem 
    /dev/sdb3  283596800 385996799 102400000  48.8G Linux filesystem 
    /dev/sdb4  385996800 386029567     32768    16M Microsoft reserved 
    /dev/sdb5  386029568 488396799 102367232  48.8G Microsoft basic data 
    6700K:~ #
    Code:
    6700K:~ # cat /etc/fstab   
    UUID=6B6D-1CDE                             /boot/efi               vfat   utf8                          0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /                       btrfs  defaults                      0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /.snapshots             btrfs  subvol=/@/.snapshots          0  0 
    # exempted from snapshotting 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /var                    btrfs  subvol=/@/var                 0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /usr/local              btrfs  subvol=/@/usr/local           0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /srv                    btrfs  subvol=/@/srv                 0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /root                   btrfs  subvol=/@/root                0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /opt                    btrfs  subvol=/@/opt                 0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /home                   btrfs  subvol=/@/home                0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /boot/grub2/x86_64-efi  btrfs  subvol=/@/boot/grub2/x86_64-efi  0  0 
    UUID=227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  /boot/grub2/i386-pc     btrfs  subvol=/@/boot/grub2/i386-pc  0  0 
    # other 
    UUID=e5a9c3b6-fbaa-4398-9814-5b531ef10944  /backup-home            btrfs  defaults                      0  0 
    6700K:~ #

    Code:
    6700K:~ # btrfs filesystem usage -T /               
    Overall: 
        Device size:                 134.74GiB 
        Device allocated:             54.04GiB 
        Device unallocated:           80.70GiB 
        Device missing:                  0.00B 
        Used:                         43.12GiB 
        Free (estimated):             90.72GiB      (min: 90.72GiB) 
        Free (statfs, df):            90.72GiB 
        Data ratio:                       1.00 
        Metadata ratio:                   1.00 
        Global reserve:               96.19MiB      (used: 0.00B) 
        Multiple profiles:                  no 
    
                 Data     Metadata System               
    Id Path      single   single   single   Unallocated 
    -- --------- -------- -------- -------- ----------- 
     1 /dev/sdb2 52.01GiB  2.00GiB 32.00MiB    80.70GiB 
    -- --------- -------- -------- -------- ----------- 
       Total     52.01GiB  2.00GiB 32.00MiB    80.70GiB 
       Used      41.99GiB  1.13GiB 16.00KiB             
    6700K:~ #
    Actually 6700K is a triple boot system with Leap on /dev/sdb3 and Windows 10 on /dev/sdb4 and /dev/sdb5. Backups of /home rely on btrfs "subvolume snapshot" and "send" commands.

    Any suggestion?
    Stick to btrfs. Use a single partition occupying the whole space available.
    i7-6700K (2016), i5-8250U (2018), AMD Ryzen 5 3400G (2020), 5600X (2022) openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma

  8. #8
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Main thing bad about all on one partition is that it can be difficult to change distros and some times upgrade with /home being sub partition on root partition. having separate /home and swap is more flexible then putting all eggs in one basket.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    Main thing bad about all on one partition is that it can be difficult to change distros and some times upgrade with /home being sub partition on root partition. having separate /home and swap is more flexible than putting all eggs in one basket.
    I disagree.

    1. btrfs is part of the kernel and thus available for any distribution. Mounting subvolume /@/home is straight forward:
    Code:
    erlangen:~ # grep /@/home /etc/fstab  
    UUID=0e58bbe5-eff7-4884-bb5d-a0aac3d8a344  /home                   btrfs  subvol=/@/home                0  0 
    erlangen:~ #
    
    2. btrfs can be resized while mounted. When upgrading the hardware I decided to have a pristine install of Tumbleweed. Freed some space in a fraction of a second by squeezing /dev/nvme0n1p2 while mounted. Performed fresh install on /dev/nvme0n1p3:
    Code:
    erlangen:~ # fdisk -l /dev/nvme0n1 
    Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 1.82 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
    Disk model: Samsung SSD 970 EVO Plus 2TB             
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes 
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes 
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes 
    Disklabel type: gpt 
    Disk identifier: F5B232D0-7A67-461D-8E7D-B86A5B4C6C10 
    
    Device             Start       End   Sectors SizeType
    /dev/nvme0n1p1       2048    1050623    1048576  512M EFI System 
    /dev/nvme0n1p2    1050624 3804628991 3803578368  1.8T Linux filesystem 
    /dev/nvme0n1p3 3804628992 3907029134  102400143 48.8G Linux filesystem 
    erlangen:~ #
    Deleting /dev/nvme0n1p3 and expanding /dev/nvme0n1p2 can be performed without rebooting.

    BTW: All of these execute as fast as running command 'pwd':
    Code:
    erlangen:~ # df -h / 
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on 
    /dev/nvme0n1p2  1.8T  412G  1.4T  23% / 
    erlangen:~ # btrfs filesystem resize -1T / 
    Resize device id 1 (/dev/nvme0n1p2) from 1.77TiB to 789.69GiB 
    erlangen:~ # df -h / 
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on 
    /dev/nvme0n1p2  790G  412G  377G  53% / 
    erlangen:~ # btrfs filesystem resize +1T / 
    Resize device id 1 (/dev/nvme0n1p2) from 789.69GiB to 1.77TiB 
    erlangen:~ # df -h / 
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on 
    /dev/nvme0n1p2  1.8T  412G  1.4T  23% / 
    erlangen:~ #
    
    i7-6700K (2016), i5-8250U (2018), AMD Ryzen 5 3400G (2020), 5600X (2022) openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma

  10. #10
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    Default Re: How to use ext4 instead of btrfs?

    btrfs can be different versions and thus may not be exactly stable. I prefer not to trust it across distros Have not understood the love affair with BTRFS it has little or no advantage in speed It seems to be a swiss army knife does everything but not all that well.

    In any case you don't have to use BTRFS even though it is default.

    Snapper is not a backup but is a good idea for things like tumbleweed or if you are a system developer where things may occasionally need restored to previous state.

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