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Thread: Looking for a backup soultion

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    BTW: Shouldn't this be in a different forum? Admins, once you check, you are permitted to delete this post if you wish. ;-P
    "Take a Walk on a Sunny Day, Greet everyone along the way, and Make Somebody Smile, Today"
    Gerry Jack Macks"Walk On A Sunny Day" GerryJackMacks.net

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    Moving to Applications...
    openSUSE Leap 15.3; KDE Plasma 5

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    Quote Originally Posted by deano_ferrari View Post
    Moving to Applications...
    I put it where I did as I wasn't looking for support for a specific application. I thought I did good. I guess not.

    Bart

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    @dcurtisfra

    I'm pretty chuffed about your system and excited to try to create my own using the bases you provided. I will certainly learn a bunch of things.

    The question I have though, is concerning the end result. What is the structure of the directory where the backup is stored? I assume there will be one big pile of stuff after the initial backup, followed by smaller files representing changed and added files.

    What sort of maintenance should I expect concerning keeping these backups? Do all of the files after the first one have to be kept in order to be able to restore a single file? If I removed the original file and made a complete backup again, would that mean all the files after the original would be of no use?

    And, what about restoring these files?

    Bart

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    Quote Originally Posted by montana_suse_user View Post
    I put it where I did as I wasn't looking for support for a specific application. I thought I did good. I guess not.

    Bart
    Yes chit-chat was probably ok for general discussion, but applications is appropriate too...lots of alternative solutions available here as you can see.
    openSUSE Leap 15.3; KDE Plasma 5

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    Quote Originally Posted by montana_suse_user View Post
    I put it where I did as I wasn't looking for support for a specific application. I thought I did good. I guess not.

    Bart
    Hey there, Bart. Nice to see you are still here. And, no biggie, LOL.
    "Take a Walk on a Sunny Day, Greet everyone along the way, and Make Somebody Smile, Today"
    Gerry Jack Macks"Walk On A Sunny Day" GerryJackMacks.net

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    Quote Originally Posted by montana_suse_user View Post
    What is the structure of the directory where the backup is stored? I assume there will be one big pile of stuff after the initial backup, followed by smaller files representing changed and added files.
    The structure of the backup directory is a mirror of the user's directory tree.

    Quote Originally Posted by montana_suse_user View Post
    What sort of maintenance should I expect concerning keeping these backups? Do all of the files after the first one have to be kept in order to be able to restore a single file? If I removed the original file and made a complete backup again, would that mean all the files after the original would be of no use?
    Because rsync creates a mirror of the client's directory structure on the server, each file can be restored individually.
    Please take a look at the rsync option “--backup” –
    -b, --backup
    With this option, preexisting destination files are renamed as each file is transferred or deleted. You can control where the backup file goes and what (if any) suffix gets appended using the --backup-dir and --suffix options.

    Note that if you don’t specify --backup-dir, (1) the --omit-dir-times option will be forced on, and (2) if --delete is also in effect (without --delete-excluded), rsync will add a "protect" filter-rule for the backup suffix to the end of all your existing excludes (e.g. -f "P *~"). This will prevent previously backed-up files from being deleted. Note that if you are supplying your own filter rules, you may need to manually insert your own exclude/protect rule somewhere higher up in the list so that it has a high enough priority to be effective (e.g., if your rules specify a trailing inclusion/exclusion of ’*’, the auto-added rule would never be reached).
    Quote Originally Posted by montana_suse_user View Post
    And, what about restoring these files?
    It's NFS – the UNIX® rule applies – “Everything is a file.”
    • The ‘/mnt/NAS/NFS/’ directory (mount point), is a directory exactly the same as any other directory on the user's system – it ain't a “shared drive” – UNIX® users never, ever, “see” drives – they only “see” and use directories …
    • Only the UNIX® system administrators know about drives and other devices but, even they only ever write files to directories – never devices. Yes, yes, administrators have tools to deal with devices and, system programmers have system calls which can write and read directly to and from devices …

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Looking for a backup soultion

    BTW – my personal view of small system backups –
    • Encryption is fine if, you're worried about other people physically breaking into your location and attempting to access your files.

    It's OK if, and only if, you're absolutely certain that, you'll never, ever, lose the encryption key.
    If the encryption key is lost, for what ever reason, the backup is worthless.

    • Adopt the large system approach to serious backup storage – physically distance your backup media from your system's physical location.

    Large systems often have backup media storage locations at a distance of at least 50 km from the system itself – if the system is destroyed, the company's files are still available to keep the company up and running.
    One can argue that, “Cloud” solutions provide this level of security but, what if the “Cloud” servers are actually located next door to your system's location? «A possible argument for Cloud servers physically located on another continent … »

    • With the current price of rotating disks, large capacity (Terabyte) backup media is affordable for small systems – no current need to consider magnetic tape as a backup media for small systems.

    There's also, possibly, no need for compressed archives – except for those compressed file archives produced by – for example – e-Mail clients.
    The Archive/Backup volumes (the term began with magnetic tape Archives/Backups) are the large capacity disks.

    • Is RAID a solution?

    Yes, it protects against physical Disk failures but, it doesn't protect against data/file loss – if a file is deleted or, corrupted or, encrypted then, that file property is mirrored across the RAID.

    • Is a NAS a viable backup solution?

    A NAS is located on the network and, therefore, vulnerable.
    A rotating disk in a USB enclosure is often only attached to the system during the backup procedure.

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