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Thread: read only file system

  1. #1
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    Default read only file system

    I took a laptop to a meeting and booted normally. It logged into the available wifi. I had to step out of the meeting for a few minutes and closed the lid on the laptop. Upon return, it appeared normal but had dropped the wifi and could see no available wife signals even though I know there were many. At the end of the meeting, I shut it down and came home.

    I tried to reboot with a wired connection so I could update the broadcom driver, assuming that was the problem. But the laptop will not boot properly. It boots to a read-only file system with no gui. I can log in as user or root but cannot start yast. Zypper dup fails with the read-only system message. Even as I try this, I get endless messages saying its trying to write journal entries but can't to a read-only system. I have tried all the recovery boot options listed in the grub menu (the graphical one works at reboot) but none get me to the normal boot. This is a dual boot laptop with Windows 10. It continues to boot normally to Windows.

    Is there a command I can use to make the system "writeable?" Or is it just a re-install?
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #2
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    Default Re: read only file system

    I assume you first have to find out why, apparently the root file system, is mounted read-only before you can even think about repairing. After all you can not repair when you do not know what to repair.

    During boot hit Esc so you can see what happens. Look in the logs.
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3
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    Default Re: read only file system

    I second hcvv request. First thing to do is diagnose what's going on, and have in mind that a read-only file system is different than a broken/unmountable filesystem that needs structural repair.

    You can begin troubleshooting by running dmesg just after

    1) Does it keep putting root fs in read-only mode after reboots?
    2) Find the context where FS is made RO: Run "dmesg | grep -C 10 btrfs". You can paste output here. You should be able to use susepaste from your system.
    3) Do you have plenty of space to spare? Run "sudo btrfs filesystem usage /"

    There are other things you can do, but first we need information for work with. Since it's TW you should have a fairly updated kernel but if you prefer you can use a recovery disk, but probably not needed yet.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed

  4. #4

    Default Check for mounting errors in log files

    I have seen similar situations.


    The reason might be corrupted filesystem, which does not allow proper mounting of partitions according to fstab. Then Linux will boot to a very curtailed state.

    Especially this applies to filesystems that are shared (used by both) between Windows and Linux.

    Run the usual chkdsk command after booting into Windows. Reboot into Windows and run the chkdsk command again.

    If this does not help, reduce to minimum the partitions being mounting according to fstab. Then mount the remaining ones manually, one by one.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Check for mounting errors in log files

    Quote Originally Posted by ZStefan View Post
    I have seen similar situations.


    The reason might be corrupted filesystem, which does not allow proper mounting of partitions according to fstab. Then Linux will boot to a very curtailed state.

    Especially this applies to filesystems that are shared (used by both) between Windows and Linux.

    Run the usual chkdsk command after booting into Windows. Reboot into Windows and run the chkdsk command again.

    If this does not help, reduce to minimum the partitions being mounting according to fstab. Then mount the remaining ones manually, one by one.
    That is of course all very true, and that is why we wait for the OP's report about what happens during booting so we can hopefully advise more precise actions.
    Henk van Velden

  6. #6
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    Default Re: read only file system

    I have run each suggestion. I don't know how to capture the output of the linux commands, so I took pictures of the output with my cell phone. I can try to post those. In the meantime, I booted windows twice and ran chkdsk in each reboot. The results were identical and I can post a text file of the output, but the result is that "Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems . No further action is required."

    When I boot into TW, running the btrfs commands shows only one error:
    Code:
    BTRFS: error (device sda6) in btrfs_run_delayed_refs:2124: error=-5 IO failure
    BTRFS: info (device sda6): forced readonly
    BTRFS: info (device sda6): balance: ended with status: -30
    I'm typing this from a photo of the screen, but its accurate.

    When I run the other btrfs command, the process stalls with these lines:
    Code:
    Reached target Remote File Systems
    Starting Permit User Sessions
    Finished Permit user Sessions
    Starting X Display Manager
    Starting Hold until boot process finishes up
    Starting Locale Service
    Started Locale Service
    Then it stalls.
    Finally, the btrfs usage command shows I have 16GB free.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. - Arthur C. Clarke

  7. #7
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    Default Re: read only file system

    It is not clear to me what you are trying to do.

    Your Linux system has a read-only file system (probably the root file system). We are trying to find out what the system says during a boot.

    Apparently you have also an MS Windows operating system on the system and you say that there is no problem there. Then why are you running file system repair programs on that Windows system trying to repair the Windows file systems were there are no problems? Can't we concentrate on the real problem that openSUSE has?
    Henk van Velden

  8. #8

    Default Re: read only file system

    The error message doesn't sound good...

    https://forum.garudalinux.org/t/solv...o-failure/6464

    https://forum.garudalinux.org/t/solv...o-failure/6464

    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=235089

    The archlinux thread provides a BTRFS maintenance command. But I would first check if there is free space left on your linux partition/HDD/SSD.

    If you don't need/use BTRFS, simply use EXT4 next time for your opensuse...
    Kind regards

    raspu

  9. #9
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    Default Re: read only file system

    I concur that there seems to be a big problem in your Btrfs root file system. It clearly says it is forced read-only as you found out.

    I do not use Btrfs, thus can not suggest any repair path.
    Henk van Velden

  10. #10
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    Default Re: read only file system

    Quote Originally Posted by Prexy View Post
    I
    Code:
    BTRFS: info (device sda6): balance: ended with status: -30
    Mount root with skip_balance option and if it succeeds, run "btrfs balance cancel /".

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