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Thread: Unable to boot due to no space in /

  1. #1
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    Default Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Here’s the historyof this issue: The system has been running only openSUSE since about2016 with upgrade 3 months +/- after each new rev came out. Alwaysdone by reinstalling while reusing the old /home. Both / and /homewere ext4 and remain so (“if it ain’t broke don’t fix it”).


    When I got to 15.1all was fine for many months until one day the system would not boot. Shortly after thegrub selection the screen went black, keyboard became non-functioning, mouse cursor showed and responded to mouse movements. In the upper left corner of the otherwise black screen was a blinkinghyphen or underscore (maybe supposed to be a prompt (?)) that didnothing but blink.


    I didn’t bother toinvestigate, as I was in a big hurry, so I just re-installed and wentback to work. All was fine for a while until the problem returned,exactly like before. Again I was in a hurry, so I tried a Mint 20live disk. All seemed to go well, so I installed Mint and went backto work for about a week, until the problem returned.


    This time I finallygot time to really pay attention, so I installed 15.2 (still the same/home from the start), and I waited. After only two days it happenedagain.


    OK, enough history. Reading through this forum I got the idea to boot to a thumb driveand check to see if the / partition was full. It was, despite being39 Gb, so I used a gparted disk and gave the partition another 18Gb.


    When I rebooted allwent well until I left the room for an hour. When I came back thescreen was dark, no surprise likely power saving, however the PCwould not wake up. I powered down and restarted, but the old issuewas back, so I couldn’t boot up. Again I used a live disk to bootand checked the disk usage only to find that the newly expanded 57Gbpartition now had no free space!


    Furtherinvestigation shows that /var/logscontains now 47.6Gb.


    Atthis point I would greatly appreciate some advice.


    Thesystem is a Lenovo P580 laptop. Intel i7 with integrated GPU, noother GPU, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb SSD, openSUSE Leap 15.2 only (no dual bootever). /home and / are stillext4. KDE desktop.


    (SorryI can’t give more conventional diagnostics, but I can’t even bootup).
    MS user 1988-2008, Linux user 1998-present, openSUSE user since 2004
    (The first computer I used had a punch card reader)

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Something is generating a lot of log entries - like you I only use ext4 - I have since it was released in the 2008 - I used ext3 from 1999 - If it works stay with it and have some good backups.

    Delete most of the /var/log that end in .log or .xz from the recovery boot up to free space and them boot OpenSUSE again.

    After you boot up open 2 terminals and in one sudo dmesg and the other sudo journalctl -f and see what is happening

    Since you are only using ext4 it would not hurt to delete off all the btrfs junk in /etc - sudo find /etc -name btrfs\* -print | xargs -n 1 rm -rf ( I had to run 5 time to get rid of all the btrfs junk that runs ) I think it might be the source of you logs filling up.
    OpenSUSE 15.2 with VirtualBox VM's (XP, 10, Ubuntu MATE 20.04, OpenSUSE 15.2)
    Pi4 with Ubuntu MATE 20.04
    Unix since 1974 (pdp-11, Interdata, AT&T, Tandy, Convergent, Sun, IBM, NCR, and HP)
    Linux since 1995 (Mandrake, Redhat, Fedora, CentOS, OpenSUSE)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Lots of error. read logs to find out the recurring error.

  4. #4
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    Cool Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by larryr View Post
    Since you are only using ext4 it would not hurt to delete off all the btrfs junk in /etc - sudo find /etc -name btrfs\* -print | xargs -n 1 rm -rf ( I had to run 5 time to get rid of all the btrfs junk that runs )
    Code:
     > systemctl list-unit-files | grep -i 'btrfs'
    btrfsmaintenance-refresh.path                                    masked         
    btrfs-balance.service                                            static         
    btrfs-defrag.service                                             static         
    btrfs-scrub.service                                              static         
    btrfs-trim.service                                               static         
    btrfsmaintenance-refresh.service                                 masked         
    btrfs-balance.timer                                              masked         
    btrfs-defrag.timer                                               masked         
    btrfs-scrub.timer                                                masked         
    btrfs-trim.timer                                                 masked         
     >
    IMHO, it's not a usable solution to go around deleting “junk” configuration files – they're installed by packages with dependencies –
    Code:
     > rpm --query --whatprovides /etc/grub.d/80_suse_btrfs_snapshot
    grub2-snapper-plugin-2.04-lp152.7.18.2.noarch
     >
    Other files are links which mask off the systemd Btrfs services –
    Code:
     > l -d /etc/systemd/system/*btrfs*
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-balance.timer -> /dev/null
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 18. Aug 15:21 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-balance.timer.d/
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:56 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-defrag.timer -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfsmaintenance-refresh.path -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfsmaintenance-refresh.service -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-scrub.timer -> /dev/null
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 18. Aug 15:21 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-scrub.timer.d/
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:56 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-trim.timer -> /dev/null
     >
    On the other hand ‘/etc/sysconfig/btrfsmaintenance’ isn't owned by any package but, I suspect that, it was created at installation time by a package's installation script and, it's not doing anything if systemd's Btrfs services are masked …

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by dcurtisfra View Post
    Code:
     > rpm --query --whatprovides /etc/grub.d/80_suse_btrfs_snapshot
    grub2-snapper-plugin-2.04-lp152.7.18.2.noarch
     >
    Well - I see no need for btrfs snapshot management in grub2 when using ext4 and top showed 5 btrfs pids all the time til I killed the stupid btrfs stuff in /etc

    I have been running without the btrfs files in etc since 42.0 - no issues - no lockups - no problems except having to install MATE desktop as the default.

    I am old - I have been playing with computers since 1963 - I don't like the complex desktops like gnome3 or kde. I loved gnome2 and MATE is gnome 2 with another name.

    My 2 cents - YMMV
    OpenSUSE 15.2 with VirtualBox VM's (XP, 10, Ubuntu MATE 20.04, OpenSUSE 15.2)
    Pi4 with Ubuntu MATE 20.04
    Unix since 1974 (pdp-11, Interdata, AT&T, Tandy, Convergent, Sun, IBM, NCR, and HP)
    Linux since 1995 (Mandrake, Redhat, Fedora, CentOS, OpenSUSE)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by dcurtisfra View Post
    Code:
     > systemctl list-unit-files | grep -i 'btrfs'
    btrfsmaintenance-refresh.path                                    masked         
    btrfs-balance.service                                            static         
    btrfs-defrag.service                                             static         
    btrfs-scrub.service                                              static         
    btrfs-trim.service                                               static         
    btrfsmaintenance-refresh.service                                 masked         
    btrfs-balance.timer                                              masked         
    btrfs-defrag.timer                                               masked         
    btrfs-scrub.timer                                                masked         
    btrfs-trim.timer                                                 masked         
     >
    IMHO, it's not a usable solution to go around deleting “junk” configuration files – they're installed by packages with dependencies –
    Code:
     > rpm --query --whatprovides /etc/grub.d/80_suse_btrfs_snapshot
    grub2-snapper-plugin-2.04-lp152.7.18.2.noarch
     >
    Other files are links which mask off the systemd Btrfs services –
    Code:
     > l -d /etc/systemd/system/*btrfs*
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-balance.timer -> /dev/null
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 18. Aug 15:21 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-balance.timer.d/
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:56 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-defrag.timer -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfsmaintenance-refresh.path -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfsmaintenance-refresh.service -> /dev/null
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:55 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-scrub.timer -> /dev/null
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 18. Aug 15:21 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-scrub.timer.d/
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 18. Aug 15:56 /etc/systemd/system/btrfs-trim.timer -> /dev/null
     >
    On the other hand ‘/etc/sysconfig/btrfsmaintenance’ isn't owned by any package but, I suspect that, it was created at installation time by a package's installation script and, it's not doing anything if systemd's Btrfs services are masked …
    /etc/sysconfig/btrfsmaintenance is created from /usr/share/fillup-templates/sysconfig.btrfsmaintenance. Set periods to 'none' if desirable:

    Code:
    erlangen:~ # grep PERIOD /etc/sysconfig/btrfsmaintenance
    BTRFS_DEFRAG_PERIOD="daily"
    BTRFS_BALANCE_PERIOD="daily"
    BTRFS_SCRUB_PERIOD="daily"
    BTRFS_TRIM_PERIOD="daily"
    erlangen:~ #
    BTW: btrfsmaintenance runs unobtrusively in the background.
    AMD Athlon 4850e (2009), openSUSE 13.1, KDE 4, Intel i3-4130 (2014), i7-6700K (2016), i5-8250U (2018), AMD Ryzen 5 3400G (2020), openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma 5

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by larryr View Post
    no problems except having to install MATE desktop as the default.
    Welcome to the wide wonderful world of package dependencies …

    Quote Originally Posted by larryr View Post
    I have been playing with computers since 1963
    Could have been a DEC PDP-4 (18-bit) or PDP-5 (12-bit) or, something else …

    • When I began working for DEC Field Service in 1979, I wasn't playing – I was repairing PDP-11 machines …

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by dcurtisfra View Post
    Welcome to the wide wonderful world of package dependencies …


    Could have been a DEC PDP-4 (18-bit) or PDP-5 (12-bit) or, something else …

    • When I began working for DEC Field Service in 1979, I wasn't playing – I was repairing PDP-11 machines …
    IBM 1401 (I was the printer output gather - I had learn octal and hex math in school [due to President Kennedy's University of Maryland Science and Math Study Group program] so I helped with the core dumps 5th grade) and a GE 225 on a Teletype playing football.
    PDP8 w/2 sykes tapes and a TTY - PDP11/30 w/decwriter (2) RK05 and DECtape running Unix and a GT40 running Lunar Lander in 1972/73
    VaxClusters in the 1980's for Banks and Credit Unions.
    OpenSUSE 15.2 with VirtualBox VM's (XP, 10, Ubuntu MATE 20.04, OpenSUSE 15.2)
    Pi4 with Ubuntu MATE 20.04
    Unix since 1974 (pdp-11, Interdata, AT&T, Tandy, Convergent, Sun, IBM, NCR, and HP)
    Linux since 1995 (Mandrake, Redhat, Fedora, CentOS, OpenSUSE)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by larryr View Post
    Something is generating a lot of log entries - like you I only use ext4 - I have since it was released in the 2008 - I used ext3 from 1999 - If it works stay with it and have some good backups.

    Delete most of the /var/log that end in .log or .xz from the recovery boot up to free space and them boot OpenSUSE again.

    After you boot up open 2 terminals and in one sudo dmesg and the other sudo journalctl -f and see what is happening

    Since you are only using ext4 it would not hurt to delete off all the btrfs junk in /etc - sudo find /etc -name btrfs\* -print | xargs -n 1 rm -rf ( I had to run 5 time to get rid of all the btrfs junk that runs ) I think it might be the source of you logs filling up.
    Sorry to have been unresponsive.. medical appointments all day, one of the benefits of growing old. I will follow your suggestions shortly and report back.
    MS user 1988-2008, Linux user 1998-present, openSUSE user since 2004
    (The first computer I used had a punch card reader)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Unable to boot due to no space in /

    Quote Originally Posted by larryr View Post
    ...Delete most of the /var/log that end in .log or .xz from the recovery boot up to free space and then ...
    Well that took me down a rabbit hole full of surprises. I booted to a thumb drive and found very few files in /var/log the ended in .log or .xz, not enough to make any difference, so I started looking at the other files there to see what might be at fault.

    Here's a partial du of the files I found:

    Code:
    /var/log # du -s -h messages messages-20210112 warn-20210118 warn warn-20210112
    600K    messages
    16G     messages-20210112
    6.5G    warn-20210118
    16K     warn
    16G     warn-20210112
    Any idea what wrote these and/or what they mean? My impulse is to get rid of them, but I seek advice first.

    Even if I do get rid of them I want to know where they came from and if the problem is apt to simply recur.
    MS user 1988-2008, Linux user 1998-present, openSUSE user since 2004
    (The first computer I used had a punch card reader)

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