Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Genova, Italia
    Posts
    53

    Question Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    I'm a Linux and openSUSE noob who'd like to get more familiar with the terminal in order to both be more productive than with the GUI and more quickly review/update configs, would this book be a good starting point please:

    The Linux Command Line, 2nd Edition: A Complete Introduction
    https://www.amazon.com/Linux-Command...dp/1593279523/

    If not, please do suggest the proper paper one please?

    Thanks.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5 (Btrfs for / and XFS for /home) on a HP Pavilion 15-b119sl Sleekbook upgraded with a single Kingston HyperX FURY SSD (SHFS37A/240G)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Podunk
    Posts
    29,684
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Hi
    If there are specific commands, then just print to postscript file and convert to pdf?

    For example;

    Code:
    man -t date > date.ps
    ps2pdf date.ps date.pdf
    
    man -t gzip > gzip.ps
    ps2pdf gzip.ps gzip.pdf
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Genova, Italia
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    That's command by command, I'm actually looking for a book which groups them according to purpose (e.g. networking via command line, text manipulation via BASH, etc.) not just man pages, thanks.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5 (Btrfs for / and XFS for /home) on a HP Pavilion 15-b119sl Sleekbook upgraded with a single Kingston HyperX FURY SSD (SHFS37A/240G)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Podunk
    Posts
    29,684
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by darcode View Post
    That's command by command, I'm actually looking for a book which groups them according to purpose (e.g. networking via command line, text manipulation via BASH, etc.) not just man pages, thanks.
    Hi
    Then have a look at The Linux Documentation Project: http://tldp.org/ then of course the openSUSE documentation: https://doc.opensuse.org/
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    27,146

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by darcode View Post
    That's command by command, I'm actually looking for a book which groups them according to purpose (e.g. networking via command line, text manipulation via BASH, etc.) not just man pages, thanks.
    You should note the difference between using a shell (in this case bash), which allows you to give commands (but has also a lot of features and some programming structures) and the tools which you are most probably then call with those commands.

    While learning the shell (by reading a book, an on-line course or a "physical" course will doubtless teach you a lot of general commands "on the go" (like ls, grep, sort, .....), in the end you will have to dig into the tools as such. And the number of them is more or less boundless.

    The categories of commands you name are all in the realm of managing the operating system, And even there there are many. Growing every day, differing in importance by distribution (no zypper on Unbuntu) and OTOH some will grow old and become unused. You learn these by the documentation af e.g. network management and then refine that by reading the man pages.

    It is huge. But starting to learn about using bash is a good point, because when you then start on e.g. network commands, you can go and test them while you are understanding why and where you have to use e.g. quoting, etc.
    Last edited by hcvv; 02-Aug-2020 at 12:55.
    Henk van Velden

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    São Leopoldo, RS, Brazil
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by darcode View Post
    ...text manipulation via BASH...
    Learn interactive bash & tools and some bash scripting like piping, conditions, parameters. For more complex logic, bash will annoy you, so consider a mainstream programming language. Python3 is a good choice. Write logic as python programs and use bash to compose them.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,370

    Cool Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by darcode View Post
    If not, please do suggest the proper paper one please?
    My personal 1st stop for books (real ones – not on the screen on any form whatsoever … ) is, O'Reilly …
    • These days, a little bit difficult but, simply search for “Books” and then “Bash” …

    The “classical” O'Reilly Bash books are:
    1. “Learning the bash Shell, 3rd Edition” – 2005 – ISBN: 9780596009656
    2. “Bash Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition” – 2016 – ISBN: 9781491941591
    3. “bash Cookbook, 2nd Edition” – 2017 – ISBN: 9781491975336

    And then, there's “Unix for the Impatient” – 1995 – Addison-Wesley Professional – ISBN 0201823764 – ISBN13: 0785342823769

    May I suggest that, if you have a local book store, use it – simply take these ISBNs to them and ask if they can order them – a good book store has access to a book retailer's network which is usually independent of J. Bezo and, they'll also, probably, have access to used books sources and, they can usually have to the orders delivered within a day or two at a price better than what Bezos offers …

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Genova, Italia
    Posts
    53

    Thumbs up Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by darcode View Post
    That's command by command, I'm actually looking for a book which groups them according to purpose (e.g. networking via command line, text manipulation via BASH, etc.) not just man pages, thanks.
    Not a paper book, but still a wealth of good reference, so thank you.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5 (Btrfs for / and XFS for /home) on a HP Pavilion 15-b119sl Sleekbook upgraded with a single Kingston HyperX FURY SSD (SHFS37A/240G)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Genova, Italia
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    You should note the difference between using a shell (in this case bash), which allows you to give commands (but has also a lot of features and some programming structures) and the tools which you are most probably then call with those commands.

    While learning the shell (by reading a book, an on-line course or a "physical" course will doubtless teach you a lot of general commands "on the go" (like ls, grep, sort, .....), in the end you will have to dig into the tools as such. And the number of them is more or less boundless.

    The categories of commands you name are all in the realm of managing the operating system, And even there there are many. Growing every day, differing in importance by distribution (no zypper on Unbuntu) and OTOH some will grow old and become unused. You learn these by the documentation af e.g. network management and then refine that by reading the man pages.

    It is huge. But starting to learn about using bash is a good point, because when you then start on e.g. network commands, you can go and test them while you are understanding why and where you have to use e.g. quoting, etc.
    Sorry I wasn't clear, yes: I meant common linux commands to admin/configure your own system (networking, device drivers, peripherals, Xorg/Wayland, partitions, boot options, etc.) and text manipulation in the shell also geared towards that (using VI or Nano to edit configuration files), I'm using openSUSE mainly, but Manjaro too, so the more disto agnostic the better (e.g. ifconfig/ip), but also distro specific tools (e.g. zypper and pacman), thanks.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5 (Btrfs for / and XFS for /home) on a HP Pavilion 15-b119sl Sleekbook upgraded with a single Kingston HyperX FURY SSD (SHFS37A/240G)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Genova, Italia
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Linux Command Line Paper Manual

    Quote Originally Posted by awerlang View Post
    Learn interactive bash & tools and some bash scripting like piping, conditions, parameters. For more complex logic, bash will annoy you, so consider a mainstream programming language. Python3 is a good choice. Write logic as python programs and use bash to compose them.
    I meant text manipulation in the shell geared towards that (using VI or Nano to edit configuration files), thank you.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5 (Btrfs for / and XFS for /home) on a HP Pavilion 15-b119sl Sleekbook upgraded with a single Kingston HyperX FURY SSD (SHFS37A/240G)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •