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Thread: Will the Windows 10 mistakes cause Windows users to switch to Linux and openSUSE?

  1. #11
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    Cool Re: Will the Windows 10 mistakes cause Windows users to switch to Linux and openSUSE?

    From a software development view, the major differences between Open Source and “working for the man” are:
    • With Open Source, the copyright on the code you write remains with you.
    • With commercial software, the copyright on the code is the property of your employer (usually)
    • With Open Source, your name is attached to the code – world wide …
    • With commercial software, the only names associated with the code are those of the upper management …
    • With Open Source, everyone gets to see how well you write code and, the code is inspected and, it's possible to submit bug reports, crash dumps and issues found – world wide …
      • Formal testing is, alas and alack, a major issue in far too many cases …

    • With commercial software, the code is usually not available for inspection and, one has to trust that, an acceptable amount of testing has been performed and, it's usually difficult to report any errors found …

    No, I haven't mentioned “free” because, which “free” is meant here?
    • Free” as in freedom.
    • Free” as in “the licence fee is not defined as being a monetary value” …

  2. #12
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    Cool Re: Will the Windows 10 mistakes cause Windows users to switch to Linux and openSUSE?

    And, I'm an unashamed democrat – as in someone who strongly believes that, we haven't found anything to better than democratic government …
    • And no, I do not mean the US American political party

    Therefore, I'm strongly of the opinion that, everything in a digital world which deals with the interface between the population and the government, should be Open Source.

    And, government institutions which directly deal with the population's interests, such as:
    • the tax department;
    • the registration offices – births, deaths, passports, driver's licences, personal ID cards, residence location, land registry;
    • public services – water, sewage, rubbish collection;
    • agricultural control and subsidies;

    should publish all their applications as Open Source for public inspection.

    Yes, I've omitted industrial interests because, business is a legal person who doesn't get to vote – if businesses feel that, their governmental interfaces should also be Open Source then, that's their business …

    Yes, I've also omitted everything to do with Law and Order and Justice …

    Yes, I've also omitted the politicians and politics – let's get our interfaces with the governments sorted and then, we'll deal with the politicians …

  3. #13
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    Default Windows 10 at five: Don't get too comfortable, the rules will change again

    On the fifth anniversary of Windows 10, Ed Bott looks back at what it was supposed to be and what it ultimately became. Almost nothing turned out as planned, and that’s OK.

    Still, Windows 10 accomplished its two biggest jobs

    Despite the occasional twists and turns that Windows 10 has taken in the past five years, it has accomplished its two overarching goals.

    First, it erased the memory of Windows 8 and its confusing interface. For the overwhelming majority of Microsoft's customers who decided to skip Windows 8 and stick with Windows 7, the transition was reasonably smooth. Even the naming decision, to skip Windows 9 and go straight to 10 was, in hindsight, pretty smart.

    Second, it offered an upgrade path to customers who were still deploying Windows 7 in businesses. That alternative became extremely important when we zoomed past the official end-of-support date for Windows 7 in January 2020.

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/window...-and-thats-ok/
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  4. #14
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    Talking Re: Windows 10 at five: Don't get too comfortable, the rules will change again

    Quote Originally Posted by karlmistelberger View Post
    Second, it offered an upgrade path to customers who were still deploying Windows 7 in businesses.
    This upgrade path has also meant that, local government, at least around here, has, AFAICS, moved to Windows 10 – except for the very few cases who had moved away from Redmond anyway …
    • We're left with the issue of “transparent government” with closed source commercial applications …

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