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Thread: what has happened to minds of developers

  1. #1
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    Default what has happened to minds of developers

    I am sure some of out there can remember the "Forbin Project: Colossus" about the computer that decided the best way it could serve man was to enslave man. The computer had NO OFF Button and answered to nobody but itself.

    The Point:
    1. Someone that answers themselves is probably insane - right.
    2. If every disaster movie and genre out there tells us that you must have an OFF BUTTON why do developers insist on releasing software without them. You have this nice shiny new computer and all is finally working fantastic. But this computer has a mind of it's own. It's capacitive mouse pad is so sensitive that without you noticing because your eyes are focused on the letters you are typing up, that the computer decided to insert the contents of the clipboard 1000 times. In frustration when you finally notice you clip the desktop outside the application and WHAM! you got a sticky note from KJots on your desktop and when you try to remove it you get another sticky from plasma-stickynote!!!
    3. The mark of a poorly run business is one where nothing gets done without 10000 stickies pasted all over the place.

    I don't have Alzheimer's so I don't need reminders. Put a shut off until I need it on the sticky-note from Plasma, and the mirror one from KDE. Not every action I do warrants going to the clipboard. THE CLIPBOARD IS FOR WHAT I WANT TO SAVE. If I make a mistake and delete something by accident, and there is no undo in the program I might elect to protect myself by sending it to the clipboard instead of deleting. But to make every action go to the clipboard is insane! How about a Go-Away-Button for the clipboard, And a Mind-Own-Business Button for the auto-insert. And maybe we can hardwire these buttons to give a serious jolt to any developer that fails to realize that just because we can doesn't mean we should.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    I hadn't noticed until I read your post. But it is true - a lot of stuff goes to the clipboard that I did not deliberately put there. I can't imagine what useful purpose that might serve.

    The problem is bigger than that though. Every device - computer, cell phone, TV and even my car - tries to force me to do what some anonymous programmer wants instead of what I want. A constant stream of advertisements, political propaganda, senseless games, and subtle coercion tries to dictate what I want and how I spend my time.

    My cell phone alerts me to every whiff of gas the propagandists emit, goes berserk if some neurotic mom 800 miles away forgot where she left her children, and makes game updates sound like the advent of paradise. I just want the convenience of being able to make and receive calls, get maps, and have my contacts and calendar handy all the time.

    My car starts beeping if I swerve to avoid a deer carcass in the road, operates the windshield wipers and dim/bright lights according to some mysterious formula, decides how close I should follow the car ahead, and starts whining if I decide to stop and see an old friend not on the pre-planned route.

    By the time I have sorted through thousands of programs from dozens of providers on my TV for something interesting, it is bed time. All I wanted was a bedtime story but instead I read reviews. It is like going to a fine restaurant, reading the menu and going home without eating.

    All this means I have to spend my time reading manuals on how to use or turn off bothersome features instead of moving toward achieving my goals.

    These devices should be tools to do routine tasks, leaving my mind free to function. Instead, they have become a constant distraction. It is wonderful and terrible at the same time.
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHoot View Post
    I hadn't noticed until I read your post. But it is true - a lot of stuff goes to the clipboard that I did not deliberately put there. I can't imagine what useful purpose that might serve.

    The problem is bigger than that though. Every device - computer, cell phone, TV and even my car - tries to force me to do what some anonymous programmer wants instead of what I want. A constant stream of advertisements, political propaganda, senseless games, and subtle coercion tries to dictate what I want and how I spend my time.

    My cell phone alerts me to every whiff of gas the propagandists emit, goes berserk if some neurotic mom 800 miles away forgot where she left her children, and makes game updates sound like the advent of paradise. I just want the convenience of being able to make and receive calls, get maps, and have my contacts and calendar handy all the time.

    My car starts beeping if I swerve to avoid a deer carcass in the road, operates the windshield wipers and dim/bright lights according to some mysterious formula, decides how close I should follow the car ahead, and starts whining if I decide to stop and see an old friend not on the pre-planned route.

    By the time I have sorted through thousands of programs from dozens of providers on my TV for something interesting, it is bed time. All I wanted was a bedtime story but instead I read reviews. It is like going to a fine restaurant, reading the menu and going home without eating.

    All this means I have to spend my time reading manuals on how to use or turn off bothersome features instead of moving toward achieving my goals.

    These devices should be tools to do routine tasks, leaving my mind free to function. Instead, they have become a constant distraction. It is wonderful and terrible at the same time.
    In my early years of programming I submitted an assignment and forgot to include an undo or return to defaults option and the instructor went up one side and down the other over it is unforgivable for a professional to ever make such a mistake. He went on to quote a story from his time working on a mainframe system where if someone chose save and decided to not save but return to where they left off it was impossible and this problem almost closed the company and all it's dealings for weeks until someone found the bad pnuemonic in the assembly code responsible.
    ld bax,[cdx+bdx] should have read ldi bax,[cdx+bdx] ... both are right monics but two different values one loads the address at the memory and the other loads the data from the address pointed to. He never let me forget it.

    It's like the need for speed and rapid deployment out ways proper thinking.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    My 2 cents on yet another pretentious thread title: step up, help out, they apparently can use your wisdom.
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

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  5. #5
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    Cool Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by techwiz03 View Post
    Not every action I do warrants going to the clipboard. THE CLIPBOARD IS FOR WHAT I WANT TO SAVE.
    Watching my KDE Plasma Clipboard while replying to this, I notice that, it mainly stores what I mark either with the mouse or, the keyboard – “shift - arrow keys – possibly with <Ctrl->” – which was the standard UNIX® behaviour …

    But, I do notice that, it also saves anything I happened to <Ctrl-C> copy within Dolphin …
    • Hmmm – can't really decide if, that's, possibly, going too far …

  6. #6
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    Question Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by techwiz03 View Post
    Not every action I do warrants going to the clipboard. THE CLIPBOARD IS FOR WHAT I WANT TO SAVE.
    Did you take a look at the KDE Klipper handbook?
    There's an interesting point in there:
    Note

    The X Window System® uses two separate clipboard buffers: the “selection” and the “clipboard”. Text is placed in the selection buffer by simply selecting it, and can be pasted with the middle mouse button. To place text in the clipboard buffer, select it and press Ctrl+X or Ctrl+C. Text from the clipboard buffer is pasted using Ctrl+V or by selecting Paste in a context menu.
    Changing Clipboard/Selection Behavior

    In order to change clipboard/selection behavior, select Configure Klipper... from the Klipper context menu, and in the dialog box that appears, select the General page. Unchecking Synchronize contents of the clipboard and the selection makes the clipboard and selection function as completely separate buffers as described above. With this option set, the option Ignore selection will prevent Klipper from including the contents of the selection in its clipboard history and from performing actions on the contents of the selection. Selecting Synchronize contents of the clipboard and the selection causes the clipboard and selection buffers to always be the same, meaning that text in the selection can be pasted with either the middle mouse button or the key combination Ctrl+V, and similarly for text in the clipboard buffer.
    Is this what you're maybe looking for?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    My 2 cents on yet another pretentious thread title: step up, help out, they apparently can use your wisdom.
    Why bother when you can cry, whine, moan and complain about things you've never contributed into and get for free.

    The entitlement here is strong..
    .: miuku #suse @ irc.freenode.net
    :: miuku@opensuse.org

    .: h​ttps://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/Miuku/

  8. #8
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    My 2 cents on yet another pretentious thread title: step up, help out, they apparently can use your wisdom.
    I know my limits all too well. I am here in soapbox venting because it squashes the basic desire to grab someone by the neck and shake till it goes limp. It's been close to 10 years since I did any programming for my self and probably 20 years since did it for others. I have forgot so much more than most ever learn. But when I see my ability to function restricted at every turn by upgrades and updates that were so poorly tested or worse so poorly thought through that it leaves you with less of a system than you had before. I opened this comment to poke fun at the developers who might see this and have forgot basic development rules. Like who wants to enter a traffic circle that has no exit.
    The community is great, they have helped me through problems that never should have existed in the first place. but with each new update / upgrade I can do less with my system. Lost my old scanner and plotter when linux kernel changed from 2.4 to 2.6 now only runs in virtualbox-2k because microsoft doesn't support these two devices either since xp. Going from 13.2 to leap42.1 lost considerable stability, many working apps had to be uninstalled and reinstalled. My preferred programming language of xbasic no longer functions in linux but does function in windows. Oh wait that was before the way drives are given access changed. My drives were accessible to all user and virtualbox as long as I did inplace upgrade. But going from leap 15.0 to leap 15.1 was an enormous mistake. Inplace upgrade trashed so much of my system with problems that i had to make a clean fresh install and now productivity is almost 0. Nothing in leap 15.1 has worked the way any other version of opensuse ever worked. Pretencious thread you say! Because I make a comment aimed at developers that have brains welded in park, hoping they will break that weld put the thinking cap and remember their contribution should command admiration not distain. As far as jumping in and helping the developers out how? I have a system I can't trust from one minute to the next. just writing this post I have had to reboot 5 times because of 15.1 lock-ups.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHoot View Post
    I hadn't noticed until I read your post. But it is true - a lot of stuff goes to the clipboard that I did not deliberately put there. I can't imagine what useful purpose that might serve.

    The problem is bigger than that though. Every device - computer, cell phone, TV and even my car - tries to force me to do what some anonymous programmer wants instead of what I want. A constant stream of advertisements, political propaganda, senseless games, and subtle coercion tries to dictate what I want and how I spend my time.

    My cell phone alerts me to every whiff of gas the propagandists emit, goes berserk if some neurotic mom 800 miles away forgot where she left her children, and makes game updates sound like the advent of paradise. I just want the convenience of being able to make and receive calls, get maps, and have my contacts and calendar handy all the time.

    My car starts beeping if I swerve to avoid a deer carcass in the road, operates the windshield wipers and dim/bright lights according to some mysterious formula, decides how close I should follow the car ahead, and starts whining if I decide to stop and see an old friend not on the pre-planned route.

    By the time I have sorted through thousands of programs from dozens of providers on my TV for something interesting, it is bed time. All I wanted was a bedtime story but instead I read reviews. It is like going to a fine restaurant, reading the menu and going home without eating.

    All this means I have to spend my time reading manuals on how to use or turn off bothersome features instead of moving toward achieving my goals.

    These devices should be tools to do routine tasks, leaving my mind free to function. Instead, they have become a constant distraction. It is wonderful and terrible at the same time.
    Point of the thread exactly. Developers need to go back to basics! The computer is a tool which should work in a prescribed way by it's end users. Unfortunately, developers have forgotten that. If they keep going the way they are we will be enslaved by these unthinking, unfeeling machines. Right now the gliches that we are experiencing that frustrate us so are still glitches that can be fixed. But with each revision we are getting closer to self aware thinking machines. Right now your car complains about you stopping to see a friend, your TV gives you so much meaningless choices that you spend all your time trying to decide what to watch. Wait till your computer attains self awareness, stumbles on remnants of crappy code that wasn't cleared from memory yet, or used developer code that was not done right, and you wake to the computer telling you "from now on you will do what I say when I say. resistance is futile."
    In the old days we had these little things call config routines. You didn't have to go looking for some obscure file in some directory, make some changes by reading some manual which someone wrote 100 revisions ago. You just clicked the config button and made changes to the settings and with each change the effect of what you were doing was told to you. Now, you follow some instructions made by a community member that may still apply or may have changed and don't apply. Developers are charged with maintaining the code but they don't have to account for the white papers, siting that coders are normally not well versed at writing. Can't rap my head around that one. If you can't explain what you did and how to use this new app / feature, and yes I will say it, ARE TOO LAZY OR TOO BUSY OR TOO UNPROFESSIONAL to bother writing instructions then what good are you. You code may be the best thing to ever come along but it is only as good as you can explain it to the masses.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: what has happened to minds of developers

    My solution has always been to KISS, uninstall/disable almost anything related to
    • Klipper,
    • PIM,
    • Akonadi,
    • Avahi,
    • Baloo,
    • Canberra,
    • notifications,
    • animations,
    • Activities,
    • Services,
    • Widgets and
    • superfluous eyecandy (looking at you, Plymouth and KDE startup animations)

    …and configure any of their keyboard shortcuts+hotkeys to do nothing (or, alternatively, something useful to me).
    That’s what KDE’s considerable configurability is for.

    After uninstalling any unneeded fluff and making sure my openSUSE Leap still is usable and stable, I then proceed to mark those superfluous packages as »taboo« (YaST) or »locked« (zypper). That way, I’ve accumulated almost 400 packages (many of them optional *-lang packages) I probably never have to install again:
    Code:
    rig:~ ▶ zypper ll
      #   | Name                               | Type    | Repository
      ----+------------------------------------+---------+-----------
      1   | Mesa-dri-nouveau                   | package | (any)     
      2   | ModemManager-lang                  | package | (any)     
      3   | MozillaFirefox-translations-common | package | (any)     
      4   | NetworkManager                     | package | (any)     
      5   | NetworkManager-applet-lang         | package | (any)     
      6   | NetworkManager-branding-openSUSE   | package | (any)     
      7   | NetworkManager-lang                | package | (any)     
      8   | OpenIPMI                           | package | (any)     
      9   | PackageKit                         | package | (any)     
      10  | PackageKit-gstreamer-plugin        | package | (any)     
      11  | PackageKit-lang                    | package | (any)     
      12  | accountsservice-lang               | package | (any)     
      13  | acpica                             | package | (any)     
      14  | adjtimex                           | package | (any)     
      15  | apache-commons-logging             | package | (any)     
      16  | apparmor-abstractions              | package | (any)     
      17  | ark-lang                           | package | (any)     
      18  | at-spi2-atk-common                 | package | (any)     
      19  | at-spi2-core-lang                  | package | (any)     
      20  | atk-lang                           | package | (any)     
      21  | audacity-lang                      | package | (any)
    … dot dot dot …
    Code:
      385 | xscreensaver                       | package | (any)     
      386 | xz-lang                            | package | (any)     
      387 | yast2-iscsi-client                 | package | (any)     
      388 | yast2-iscsi-lio-server             | package | (any)     
      389 | yast2-multipath                    | package | (any)     
      390 | yast2-nfs-client                   | package | (any)     
      391 | yast2-printer                      | package | (any)     
      392 | yast2-samba-client                 | package | (any)     
      393 | yast2-samba-server                 | package | (any)     
      394 | yast2-scanner                      | package | (any)     
      395 | yelp                               | package | (any)     
      396 | zenity-lang                        | package | (any)
    Side benefits of keeping your system simple:
    • We learn stuff;
    • sense of satisfaction and serenity;
    • fast and lean computer;
    • less bloat means smaller attack surface and tendencially more secure systems;
    • a Linux installation that is easier to reason about.


    Cheers!

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