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Thread: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

  1. #51
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Looks like I'm getting around to it this weekend, if not then next week. Based on tutorials for other distros, I noted down this command to ensure GRUB2 is automatically reinstalled for the right target:

    Code:
    grub2-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/boot/efi --bootloader-id=opensuse --recheck /dev/sda
    I'm worried about one more thing: Does the openSUSE installation DVD require that I add a Secure Boot key to the UEFI? The purpose of SB is to check that anything being booted is signed... this would also include installers! As I'm new to this I wanted to make sure I know how the system will behave on booting the USB stick, so I don't find myself in a situation where I have issues even with the installer.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed x64, KDE Framework 5

  2. #52
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    Does the openSUSE installation DVD require that I add a Secure Boot key to the UEFI? The purpose of SB is to check that anything being booted is signed... this would also include installers!
    Then installer uses "shim". And, by the way, if you want secure-boot then you need "shim-install" rather than "grub2-install". But best to let the installer handle that for you.

    "shim" is signed by a Microsoft key. So that should run without anything extra. It contains an openSUSE key, and it uses that openSUSE key to check kernels.

    On the first boot, you are prompted (with blue screen) to accept the use of the openSUSE key for verifying kernels. If you click "Yes", then you are not prompted again. That you said "Yes" is recorded in NVRAM, so that the question is not asked in future.

    If you say "No" -- well, I never tried that, but I assume that the installer won't boot in those circumstances.

    This all assumes that you have secure-boot enabled. If secure-boot is not enabled, then I don't think you are prompted for key approval.
    openSUSE Leap 15.2; KDE Plasma 5.18.5;

  3. #53
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    Then installer uses "shim". And, by the way, if you want secure-boot then you need "shim-install" rather than "grub2-install". But best to let the installer handle that for you.

    "shim" is signed by a Microsoft key. So that should run without anything extra. It contains an openSUSE key, and it uses that openSUSE key to check kernels.

    On the first boot, you are prompted (with blue screen) to accept the use of the openSUSE key for verifying kernels. If you click "Yes", then you are not prompted again. That you said "Yes" is recorded in NVRAM, so that the question is not asked in future.

    If you say "No" -- well, I never tried that, but I assume that the installer won't boot in those circumstances.

    This all assumes that you have secure-boot enabled. If secure-boot is not enabled, then I don't think you are prompted for key approval.
    Oh: So you can boot from UEFI (not MBR / Legacy) without having to use Secure Boot. Good to know; I plan to enable SB because it sounds like a good idea, but if I have an issue caused specifically by the keys I can temporarily boot without that.

    I am going to use shim-install but wasn't sure if grub2-install would also be needed before or after running that. If I can't boot after running shim, I'll disable secure boot and install just GRUB2 for UEFI until I figure it out.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed x64, KDE Framework 5

  4. #54
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    Code:
    --bootloader-id=opensuse
    If you expect ever to have more than one openSUSE version installed at the same time, such as testing a beta, or testing prior to committing to an upgrade, you may wish to be more creative, or at least, keep the following in mind for the future. That is the openSUSE default, which every installation uses. It emulates usurping the MBR in multiboot on msdos disks. Mine are opensusetw, opensuse150, opensuse151 and opensuse152, controlled via GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=" in /etc/default/grub.
    Reg. Linux User #211409 *** multibooting since 1992
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  5. #55
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmazda View Post
    If you expect ever to have more than one openSUSE version installed at the same time, such as testing a beta, or testing prior to committing to an upgrade, you may wish to be more creative, or at least, keep the following in mind for the future. That is the openSUSE default, which every installation uses. It emulates usurping the MBR in multiboot on msdos disks. Mine are opensusetw, opensuse150, opensuse151 and opensuse152, controlled via GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=" in /etc/default/grub.
    Will keep that in mind, although I don't plan on having a multi-boot system again: openSUSE Tumbleweed is all I need today so I'm using the defaults. Last time was when I also had Windows 7 installed, my Windows days have been over for 7 years now.
    openSUSE Tumbleweed x64, KDE Framework 5

  6. #56
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    I am going to use shim-install but wasn't sure if grub2-install would also be needed before or after running that.
    "shim-install" calls "grub2-install" internally. So you should not need to do that separately.
    openSUSE Leap 15.2; KDE Plasma 5.18.5;

  7. #57
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    "shim" is signed by a Microsoft key. So that should run without anything extra. It contains an openSUSE key, and it uses that openSUSE key to check kernels.
    ...
    If you say "No" -- well, I never tried that, but I assume that the installer won't boot in those circumstances.
    The question comes during the first reboot after installed has completed, so how can it affect installer? Anyway, if you say "no" the only thing that happens is that you will be asked again after next kernel update (and reboot). As you wrote yourself, SUSE shim already contains SUSE key so having this key additionally in NVRAM is entirely redundant. This allows you to use shim from different vendor to boot SUSE kernels though.

  8. #58
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    The question comes during the first reboot after installed has completed, so how can it affect installer? Anyway, if you say "no" the only thing that happens is that you will be asked again after next kernel update (and reboot).
    I think you are talking about a different question. There is one during install if booting the installer with secure-boot. But you won't see it if you have previously done that with an earlier openSUSE install.

    If I create a new virtual machine with UEFI, and do an install, then I see that prompt.
    openSUSE Leap 15.2; KDE Plasma 5.18.5;

  9. #59
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    I think you are talking about a different question. There is one during install if booting the installer with secure-boot.
    You are right, I missed when it was added. What this question does, it enables use of (SUSE) certificate embedded in shim. If you answer "no" shim will proceed using whatever certificates are currently enrolled. On a clean system with enable secure boot it means boot fails. If SUSE certificate was previously enrolled (e.g. during kernel update on TW), boot should be successful.

    Not sure why this patch was necessary. This looks more like debugging tool to me.

  10. #60
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Not sure why this patch was necessary.
    Probably a decision by the legal department (just guessing).
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