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Thread: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    Good to know, I might do that if it does. But I'd rather not be stuck using legacy settings if I can help it. In case I'm not given this option, how do I tell GRUB2 to work with the new architecture? Can I perhaps configure it in advance to support both legacy and UEFI?
    If grub2 is already booting with legacy, then you need:

    (1) an EFI partition, mounted at "/boot/efi". If you have at least one drive with GPT partitioning, create the EFI partition there. Failing that, create in your disk with DOS/Legacy partitioning, and give the partition a type code of "ef" (you can do that with "fdisk"). Whether that will work depends on your UEFI firmware. It works for me when booting an external drive, but I don't know if it would work with an internal drive.

    (2) With that EFI partition mounted at "/boot/efi", run the command:
    Code:
    shim-install --no-nvram --removable
    That won't install the NVRAM entry for booting openSUSE (because it cannot be installed unless you are already booted with UEFI). But it will provide most of what you need. You might already be able to boot after the upgrade, by using the boot entry for the hard drive (the drive with the EFI partition). But that depends on the UEFI firmware, and the support varies between manufacturers. You will, at least, have a good start and it will be relatively easy to fix later.
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Seriously, there are tools to resize and re-partition. Any such action means risk to existing data. You are always advised to have backup before attempting it. I did not use any of these tools, may be someone may share experience.
    I have a Clonezilla USB stick and will backup an image of my root partition before messing with it. Usually there's no risk during re-partitioning, except a power outage while it's working though I use an SSD so it should take less than an hour to move 100 GB of data.

    The main issue is what tool and command I need to use, considering I must boot from a rescue console to do this. I assume there's no way to tell YaST2 how to resize the root partition then have it do that on the next reboot before mounting it?

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Yes. Disk partitioning does not depend on boot mode.
    I know. I asked if I can do it now since I was thinking of reconfiguring GRUB2 to use this new partition in advance. But I assume the new UEFI mobo must first be in place for that to work and the system isn't compatible with non-UEFI ones.
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    If grub2 is already booting with legacy, then you need:

    (1) an EFI partition, mounted at "/boot/efi". If you have at least one drive with GPT partitioning, create the EFI partition there. Failing that, create in your disk with DOS/Legacy partitioning, and give the partition a type code of "ef" (you can do that with "fdisk"). Whether that will work depends on your UEFI firmware. It works for me when booting an external drive, but I don't know if it would work with an internal drive.

    (2) With that EFI partition mounted at "/boot/efi", run the command:
    Code:
    shim-install --no-nvram --removable
    That won't install the NVRAM entry for booting openSUSE (because it cannot be installed unless you are already booted with UEFI). But it will provide most of what you need. You might already be able to boot after the upgrade, by using the boot entry for the hard drive (the drive with the EFI partition). But that depends on the UEFI firmware, and the support varies between manufacturers. You will, at least, have a good start and it will be relatively easy to fix later.
    Very helpful, thank you very much! I'll get to this once I know I have the mobo... it will take a few more weeks or months to also buy the CPU and RAM so I'll have time for this preparation.

    My only specific question till then is the one I dropped above: Can I tell YaSY2 Partitioner how I want the root partition to be resized, then have it apply those changes on the next reboot? Obviously I can't resize it while it's mounted, and even more obviously I can't unmount the root partition while the OS is running. I'm trying to avoid using just console commands and would prefer the GUI to see what I'm doing.
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    Can I tell YaSY2 Partitioner how I want the root partition to be resized, then have it apply those changes on the next reboot?
    No.
    I'm trying to avoid using just console commands and would prefer the GUI to see what I'm doing.
    There are dozens of live images with GUI tools like gparted. I'm sure openSUSE images include one, otherwise there is knoppix, sysrescuecd, gparted etc etc etc.

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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    I was thinking of reconfiguring GRUB2 to use this new partition in advance
    Part of bootloader configuration in UEFI is storing boot options in motherboard NVRAM which is impossible unless you are already booted in UEFI mode. You can prepare ESP content, that's true. But unless your BIOS allows direct booting from file, you will need to boot from live image to complete configuration anyway at which point you can just as well spare previous step. At the end it is up to you.

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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    There are dozens of live images with GUI tools like gparted. I'm sure openSUSE images include one, otherwise there is knoppix, sysrescuecd, gparted etc etc etc.
    So the normal openSUSE installation image includes gparted? I remember it contains a few tools as I once used it to run memtest on new RAM modules. I'll check this out later.

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Part of bootloader configuration in UEFI is storing boot options in motherboard NVRAM which is impossible unless you are already booted in UEFI mode. You can prepare ESP content, that's true. But unless your BIOS allows direct booting from file, you will need to boot from live image to complete configuration anyway at which point you can just as well spare previous step. At the end it is up to you.
    Fair enough. So is it safe to run "shim-install --no-nvram --removable" while still on the old motherboard, or does that tell GRUB2 to already use it?

    Also: Is it okay to put this 256 MB partition at the end of my root drive instead of the beginning? I remember the partitioner doesn't need to move data on a partition when you change its ending point, only if you move the starting point further ahead... also I'd like the main root partition to still be called sda1 instead of becoming sda2.

    One more thing: Can anyone else using an UEFI board please paste the contents of their etc/fstab file? I'd like to see exactly what the parameters are, so I can recreate the setup a fresh install would as accurately as possible.
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    So is it safe to run "shim-install --no-nvram --removable" while still on the old motherboard, or does that tell GRUB2 to already use it?
    That is safe. It won't change how your system is currently booted. But it adds the directory "/boot/grub2/x86_64-efi" with what is needed for UEFI booting.
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by MirceaKitsune View Post
    So the normal openSUSE installation image includes gparted?
    Installation image probably not (it cannot even be booted into GUI mode), but Live images - yes. You have XFCE, GNOME, KDE to chose from.
    Also: Is it okay to put this 256 MB partition at the end of my root drive instead of the beginning?
    As I said - partition should be accessible by firmware. Putting it in the beginning is more robust, but one hopes that modern EFI firmware should be able to cope with large disks. You will never know until you try. Anyway, reducing filesystem size is relatively safe, and if it won't work you always can use e.g. gparted to move partitions around.

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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    That is safe. It won't change how your system is currently booted. But it adds the directory "/boot/grub2/x86_64-efi" with what is needed for UEFI booting.
    Just to be clear: Is this what the openSUSE DVD would normally set on install? I'm trying to recreate exactly what a fresh install would to, but without needing to preform one due to having to redo many system changes again.

    I was told that after I create the fat32 partition and mount it as /boot/efi I need to go to YAST2 - System - Boot Loader and switch from "GRUB2" to "GRUB2 for EFI" there. I selected that entry out of curiosity... it's a little intimidating as everything changes and it removes all previous kernels and parameters from the list. But if that's it I can use the old motherboard to give this final command before shutting down the system to change mobos, which I assume means the new one would go ahead and boot without any issues?
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    Default Re: Upgrading an existing openSUSE installation from a standard BIOS motherboard to UEFI

    It's not clear to me why there is discussion of "converting" to UEFI just because of a new motherboard. I'd reserve "converting" for such time as a replacement boot device is to be installed, or it becomes time for a different OS to be installed.

    When I got my newest Gigabyte motherboard 22 months ago, I installed everything from scratch using an SATA SSD and UEFI mode. After some months I cloned its SSD to an M.2 device and retired out the original SSD. Later still I added a pair of SATA disks, retired from my main system, that always and only ever used MBR and Grub (Legacy), and with a bunch of partitions, and 7 MD devices. When I want to boot from the old disks, I hit F12 during POST, select the P0 device (/dev/sda), and up comes the Grub Gfxmenu just like it did in the old PC. When I want to boot the M.2, I just wait a few seconds for POST to complete and show me Tumbleweed's grub-efi menu (automatically from UEFI BIOS P5) so I can make a selection. The only things I remember needing to adjust when adding the SATA disks to the Gigabyte were network configuration and hostname.
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