Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 58 of 58

Thread: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

  1. #51

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by karlmistelberger View Post
    There is no "tuning" grub.
    You're right in that.
    The OP isn't that experienced with respect to installing/moving openSUSE or other systems, as many user won't be, because it isn't their daily business. So he/she might have chosen the wrong terms.

    This thread up to now is about cloning the whole contents an old HDD, that is to be replaced, to a new SSD. The dual boot on the old HDD includes an installed windoze 7 and an older openSUSE.
    No copying of single partitions. Instead cloning will comprise the whole contents of the old HDD, including the MBR, and the boot loader as well.

  2. #52

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Hi john_snow,

    a few last hints before you proceed.

    After booting from the live USB with the HDD and the SSD plugged, what you should NOT do, is to mount any partition of your HDD, as it is done when you e.g. click on the icon of such a partition in the left sidebar of a Dolphin window in KDE (which would mount that partition and display its contents in that Dolphin window, possibly asking for the root password beforehand, which in turn running from a live USB may not even be asked for).

    In order to detect which drive is /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, etc., before running dd you can use the commands "parted -l" or "fdisk -l", which won't mount anything.

    Given the output from "parted -l" or "fdisk -l" you can as well see if there exists any partition on your new SSD. In general the SSD should be blank. But I as well had the case that an external HDD was pre-formatted with NTFS, and that the manufacturer had copied windows software to it. If that should be the case you would probably like to make 1-2 backups of that on external media, because this will be overwritten when you clone the contents of your HDD to the SSD using dd. And yes, making such backups means to mount the partition on the SSD beforehand, if there is one. So, after such a backup either unmount that partition, or just reboot.

    Another thing you could do before you clone is to check the version of dd that you have by the command "dd --version". The dd parameter "status=progress" should work starting from version 8.24 of dd. If you have a lower version of dd on your live USB then it is possible to get some information about progress using the "kill" command. Just ask if you like to know.
    When I cloned the contents of a failing 2TB hard disk to a new one a few years ago, as far as I remember that took more than 24 hours, but I had used the default block size (dd parameter bs=) of 512 Bytes then. So I felt comfortable beeing able to look what dd is doing from time to time.
    Cloning the contents of a 256GB hard disk to a SSD later on took significantly less time.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Loma Linda, Mo
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    I use clonezilla - use the disk to disk copy - it only copies the in use sectors. I have done this to dozens of Dell E7440 moving from HDD to mSATA - as long as the new drive is larger - it works wonderfully.

    http://www.clonezilla.org/downloads.php I use the stable debian based version - it is for 64 bit cpu's.

    There are tutorials on the site as well.
    Opensuse 15.1 with VirtualBox VM's (Windows 98, XP, 7, 8.1, 10 & OpenSUSE 15.0)

    Unix since 1974 (pdp-11 in "B" , Interdata 7/32 in "C") (AT&T, Tandy, Convergent, IBM, NCR, HP flavors)
    Linux since 1995 (mandrake, redhat, fedora, centos, now OpenSUSE)

  4. #54

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by ratzi View Post
    Hi john_snow,

    a few last hints before you proceed.

    After booting from the live USB with the HDD and the SSD plugged, what you should NOT do, is to mount any partition of your HDD, as it is done when you e.g. click on the icon of such a partition in the left sidebar of a Dolphin window in KDE (which would mount that partition and display its contents in that Dolphin window, possibly asking for the root password beforehand, which in turn running from a live USB may not even be asked for).

    In order to detect which drive is /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, etc., before running dd you can use the commands "parted -l" or "fdisk -l", which won't mount anything.

    Given the output from "parted -l" or "fdisk -l" you can as well see if there exists any partition on your new SSD. In general the SSD should be blank. But I as well had the case that an external HDD was pre-formatted with NTFS, and that the manufacturer had copied windows software to it. If that should be the case you would probably like to make 1-2 backups of that on external media, because this will be overwritten when you clone the contents of your HDD to the SSD using dd. And yes, making such backups means to mount the partition on the SSD beforehand, if there is one. So, after such a backup either unmount that partition, or just reboot.

    Another thing you could do before you clone is to check the version of dd that you have by the command "dd --version". The dd parameter "status=progress" should work starting from version 8.24 of dd. If you have a lower version of dd on your live USB then it is possible to get some information about progress using the "kill" command. Just ask if you like to know.
    When I cloned the contents of a failing 2TB hard disk to a new one a few years ago, as far as I remember that took more than 24 hours, but I had used the default block size (dd parameter bs=) of 512 Bytes then. So I felt comfortable beeing able to look what dd is doing from time to time.
    Cloning the contents of a 256GB hard disk to a SSD later on took significantly less time.
    I actually don't plan to reuse the old HDD and will keep it as a backup. I think that there should be no software on the msata, but this has to be verified once i get hold of it.
    On suse leap 42.3 I have
    Code:
    dd (coreutils) 8.25
    Copyright (C) 2016 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
    A cording to the man page the status option is supported.

    Code:
           status=LEVEL
                   The  LEVEL  of information to print to stderr; 'none' suppresses everything but error messages, 'noxfer'
                  suppresses the final transfer statistics, 'progress' shows periodic transfer statistics
    I will not mount any drives and will make the best use out of parted -l , in order not to mix up the drives.
    Actually, is it possible to check the drives also with lsblk?

    The only thing I am not so sure about is resizing with gparted. This i have to check.

  5. #55

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Hi again!

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    I actually don't plan to reuse the old HDD and will keep it as a backup.
    Good.
    That has an additional advantage: rotating hard disks may get damaged quite easily when the laptop is shaken while they are spinning/rotating. The reason for that is physics. An SSD has nothing in it that rotates, so shaking or vibrations won't do no harm to them even if the laptop is switched on.

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    I think that there should be no software on the msata, but this has to be verified once i get hold of it.
    That is what one would expect. But you will see. Maybe there would be some software for windows that would enable TRIM under windows? The software that I then found on that external hard disk wasn't of much use ...
    Ah, in that context I wrote
    Quote Originally Posted by ratzi View Post
    If that should be the case you would probably like to make 1-2 backups of that on external media, because this will be overwritten when you clone the contents of your HDD to the SSD using dd. And yes, making such backups means to mount the partition on the SSD beforehand, if there is one. So, after such a backup either unmount that partition, or just reboot.
    By the last I meant that you would have to reboot from the live USB to have nothing mounted from your HDD or SSD, before you run dd.

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    On suse leap 42.3 I have
    Code:
    dd (coreutils) 8.25
    Copyright (C) 2016 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
    A cording to the man page the status option is supported.

    Code:
           status=LEVEL
                   The  LEVEL  of information to print to stderr; 'none' suppresses everything but error messages, 'noxfer'
                  suppresses the final transfer statistics, 'progress' shows periodic transfer statistics
    That as well looks good, so you will easily be able to monitor what progress dd actually has made.

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    I will not mount any drives and will make the best use out of parted -l , in order not to mix up the drives.
    Good.

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    Actually, is it possible to check the drives also with lsblk?
    I've no experience with lsblk, but I looked around a bit.
    It doesn't seem to mount anything either.
    But I don't see any advantage of lsblk compared to "parted -l": when I call "parted -l" I get an information like "Disk model: Samsung SSD 850" prior to the other informations about that device. So one really knows of which kind of hardware that device is. Such kind of information isn't displayed by lsblk, lsblk just seem to list the /dev/sdaX along with their mount points (not applicable to your new SSD) and possibly UUIDs (not applicable to your new SSD either). So where is the advantage of using "lsblk" compared to using "parted -l"?

    Quote Originally Posted by john_snow View Post
    The only thing I am not so sure about is resizing with gparted. This i have to check.
    I just made some experiments, creating a primary partition and then an extended partition with 2 logical volumes on a USB stick, similar to the setup that can be seen from your output from "parted -l" of your 2nd posting. And I cloned that to a USB stick with more memory using dd.

    Using YaST > Partitioner of openSUSE Leap 15.1 to then try to increase the size of the extended partition of the cloned copy on the larger USB stick, that partitioner just says "Extended partitions cannot be resized." Period.

    But GParted as installed under openSUSE Leap 15.1 knows it better: right-clicking on the extended partition in the list of the partitions below (not the graphical representation above) I could very well increase the size the extended partition on the larger USB stick and afterwards create new logical volumes, or increase the size of the last logical volume within the extended partition.
    Using YaST > Partitioner afterwards again, these changes were very well recognized.

    If you would have installed Leap 15.1 on a USB stick including gparted you could have probably found the same ...

    OK, so, good luck! And don't damage your laptop or the devices by electric discharges. This seems to be the biggest risk now.
    Just ensure that you have the right /dev/sdX for dd.

  6. #56

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    To all those besides, who may be reading this thread, and who are considering to clone a disk that according to "parted -l" has a partition table of the type 'gpt' (instead of 'msdos'):

    If the destination disk is larger than the source disk, then after cloning using dd, the situation has to be fixed that the backup copy of the 'gpt' type partition table on the larger destination disk isn't at the end of disk anymore.

    To read more on this - and on how to fix that then - have a look at the following thread starting from posting #2
    https://forums.opensuse.org/showthre...-advice-needed
    Last edited by ratzi; 22-Sep-2019 at 23:35. Reason: typo

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    25,156

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by ratzi View Post
    To all those besides, who may be reading this thread, and who are considering to clone a disk that according to "parted -l" has a partition table of the type 'gpt' (instead of 'msdos'):

    If the destination disk is larger than the source disk, then after cloning using dd, the situation has to be fixed that the backup copy of the 'gpt' type partition table on the larger destination disk isn't at the end of disk anymore.
    Which was already explained earlier in thie (endless) thread in post #27:

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    When you copy a device to a larger device, you will have unused space at the end. This seems harmless at first sight (only when you did not buy that device because you wanted more storage space), but there maybe negative consequences on e.g. GPT devices (which your's is not) where the secondary partition table shoul be at the end of the device.
    Henk van Velden

  8. #58

    Default Re: Advice needed how to migrate a dual boot install to a MSATA drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    Which was already explained earlier in thie (endless) thread in post #27:
    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    When you copy a device to a larger device, you will have unused space at the end. This seems harmless at first sight (only when you did not buy that device because you wanted more storage space), but there maybe negative consequences on e.g. GPT devices (which your's is not) where the secondary partition table shoul be at the end of the device.
    Only partly, I would say, because in posting #27 you didn't explain how, on disks with a partition table of type 'GPT', to fix the wrong position of the (backup) copy of the partition table.

    As I wrote, it is described in the thread
    https://forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/537526-mount-advice-needed
    how to fix this - to which thread I found it useful to include a link here, because this hasn't been a main topic of the thread here, as the OP of the thread here has a partition table of type 'MSDOS' (or a legacy setup).

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •