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Thread: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

  1. #31
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by glistwan View Post
    In my opinion systemd is the best thing that happened to Linux in years. Take some time to learn it, it will not be wasted. I recommend the creators blog for the reasoning behind systemd and some cool tips and tricks
    http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/systemd.html
    Trust me, I've done extensive reading on systemd and all of the arguments for and against. I'm open minded about such changes but am not at this point overly fond of it. I am giving it a fair chance but so far am not at all impressed with it. I am very solidly in the KISS camp and systemd is about as far from that as you can get.

    I don't consider myself solidly in either the "for" or "against" tribes as I prefer to make up my own mind about things. At this point I am ambivalent about it.
    No matter where you go, there you are.

  2. #32
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by gpstrucker View Post
    Trust me, I've done extensive reading on systemd and all of the arguments for and against. I'm open minded about such changes but am not at this point overly fond of it. I am giving it a fair chance but so far am not at all impressed with it. I am very solidly in the KISS camp and systemd is about as far from that as you can get.

    I don't consider myself solidly in either the "for" or "against" tribes as I prefer to make up my own mind about things. At this point I am ambivalent about it.
    I am really glad you are giving it a chance and not hate it just because. I guess it depends on how you look at it but for me it's the other way around systemd makes things easier as the unit files are easier to read than some of the sysinitv complex scripts. It also makes it easier across distributions since you can use the same systemctl syntax for stoping/starting services and enabling/disabling them on boot.
    Previously Redhat had its own structure for init scripts, Slackware had something else, Debian also did it's own thing. Also creating things like docker swarm would be super hard without systemd I believe.
    But I can completely understand you seeing it the other way to each their own.
    Best regards,
    Greg

  3. #33
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Another cool thing that could not be easily done without systemd:
    https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/...ynamicUserLike
    Best regards,
    Greg

  4. #34
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Regarding systemd,
    One significant change is the way multiple instances of something can be spun up, and every one shares resources with each other to minimize total resources used.

    So,
    The other day I was looking at the contents of /dev and stared at the number of ttys available... I remember in the days of SysVinit that there were only 8 ttys available, and although for simple things that was enough there were times when a system under heavy load might exhaust the number of available ttys. To address this, the User had to create new ttys beforehand which wasn't difficult but was a necessary "something that had to be done."

    A case might be made that the available of ttys now available by default might be completely overboard, but on the other hand you could probably say that there is almost no chance any system would run into this kind of bottleneck today.

    Similarly,
    in a SysVinit system, a very large number of init files are supposed to be repetitive, and systemd instead through its use of Unit files attempts to re-use code and thereby more efficiently use resources instead of invoking exact copies with each fully using its own separate resources.

    Just one of many differences between SysVinit and systemd.

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