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Thread: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

  1. #21
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by gpstrucker View Post
    Slackware does have a package manager, ...
    It did not have one back when I was using it (roughly, 1995-2005).
    openSUSE Leap 15.1; KDE Plasma 5;

  2. #22
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by gpstrucker View Post
    Slackware does have a package manager, it's called slackpkg and is part of the default installation.
    When I was using it (it was slackware version with kde3 don't remember the exact number) you could manually download packages from:
    http://packages.slackware.it/search....t=1&q=x+server
    and then install it with some tool (don't remember the name). The tool was super crude, there was no repository management, no dependency resolution and so on. When I was leaving the distribution I learned about slapt-get but never got to try it myself. (it was not part of the standard distrubution, you had to install the package manager yourself)
    Best regards,
    Greg

  3. #23
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by glistwan View Post
    When I was using it (it was slackware version with kde3 don't remember the exact number) you could manually download packages from:
    http://packages.slackware.it/search....t=1&q=x+server
    and then install it with some tool (don't remember the name).
    The tool was probably "tar". Slackware has long used *.tar.gz for its packaging.
    openSUSE Leap 15.1; KDE Plasma 5;

  4. #24
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    The tool was probably "tar". Slackware has long used *.tar.gz for its packaging.
    Yes the packages were in tar.gz format but the tool was more sophisticated than "tar" from user perspective it was like "rpm" or "dpkg".
    Best regards,
    Greg

  5. #25
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    I think I was using Slackware version 10.0 and the tool was called "installpkg":
    https://docs.slackware.com/slackbook:package_management
    Best regards,
    Greg

  6. #26
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    The standard tool for Slack is pkgtool. installpkg, upgradepkg, etc are all part of the package management toolkit. Slackware has never had dependency management, the user is expected to handle that on their own. I never had an issue with that aspect and in many ways prefer it even now. In my opinion the best way to handle slackbuilds is with sbotools (which does do some dependency management for the slackbuilds just to save time).

    So far I'm still using and liking Tumbleweed. I've run into a few small issues here and there which I have resolved as they came up, partly just bugs from switching to a newer snapshot, but some due to my not being overly familiar with systemd. If anything makes me switch back to Slack it will likely be systemd as so far I can't say that I really like it and feel it's taken something simple and made it overly complex. But I'm willing to live with it and learn more about it before I decide one way or the other.
    No matter where you go, there you are.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    gpstrucker, welcome to the forum. There are quite a few current and prior Slackers here. openSUSE chairman Richard Brown started with Slackware, and I am sure you know SUSE started with Slackware as well.

    I have it on a box over ~~~~~~> to keep an eye on systemd and stay current/aware of it.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by gpstrucker View Post
    I realize that Yast is the big selling point for SUSE but I don't really use it that much (so far). I tend to do most things from cli, but I did find it excellent for setting up the printer so I don't have anything negative to say about it.
    use yast from cli and it brings up the ncurses version.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    It did not have one back when I was using it (roughly, 1995-2005).

    http://docs.slackware.com/slackbookackage_management


    https://docs.slackware.com/slackware:slackpkg

  10. #30
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    Default Re: A Slacker's Impression of Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by gpstrucker View Post
    The standard tool for Slack is pkgtool. installpkg, upgradepkg, etc are all part of the package management toolkit. Slackware has never had dependency management, the user is expected to handle that on their own. I never had an issue with that aspect and in many ways prefer it even now. In my opinion the best way to handle slackbuilds is with sbotools (which does do some dependency management for the slackbuilds just to save time).

    So far I'm still using and liking Tumbleweed. I've run into a few small issues here and there which I have resolved as they came up, partly just bugs from switching to a newer snapshot, but some due to my not being overly familiar with systemd. If anything makes me switch back to Slack it will likely be systemd as so far I can't say that I really like it and feel it's taken something simple and made it overly complex. But I'm willing to live with it and learn more about it before I decide one way or the other.
    In my opinion systemd is the best thing that happened to Linux in years. Take some time to learn it, it will not be wasted. I recommend the creators blog for the reasoning behind systemd and some cool tips and tricks
    http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/systemd.html
    Best regards,
    Greg

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