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Thread: installing qem-kvm in terminal

  1. #1

    Default installing qem-kvm in terminal

    I installed qemu by simply typing in terminal:

    Code:
    zypper in qemu
    Is that the correct way? Also what are the next steps to get everything working?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by ultra99 View Post
    I installed qemu by simply typing in terminal:

    Code:
    zypper in qemu
    Is that the correct way? Also what are the next steps to get everything working?
    Hi
    I would suggest qemu-kvm and that should pull in the necessary package. How do you want to manage, GUI or command line?

    I normally install virt-manager/libvirt-daemon.
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
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    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by ultra99 View Post
    Also what are the next steps to get everything working?
    Define "everything". To run virtual machine you call qemu-system-x86_64 (I presume you are on x86, not ARM or S390) with suitable parameters. Qemu has many parameters and internet is full of examples how to use it. Or at least explain what you intend to do with QEMU so that someone could suggest suitable invocation.
    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmlewis View Post
    Hi
    I would suggest qemu-kvm and that should pull in the necessary package.
    The only thing it pulls is qemu-x86 (on x86) which should already be installed together with qemu by default (unless recommends are suppressed).

    I normally install virt-manager/libvirt-daemon.
    Personally I found it an overkill for one off use, but I agree that for long term usage or for a newbie wrapper around low level qemu is better.

  4. #4

    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Define "everything". To run virtual machine you call qemu-system-x86_64 (I presume you are on x86, not ARM or S390) with suitable parameters. Qemu has many parameters and internet is full of examples how to use it. Or at least explain what you intend to do with QEMU so that someone could suggest suitable invocation.

    The only thing it pulls is qemu-x86 (on x86) which should already be installed together with qemu by default (unless recommends are suppressed).


    Personally I found it an overkill for one off use, but I agree that for long term usage or for a newbie wrapper around low level qemu is better.
    GUI. I want a vm to install win10.

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    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by ultra99 View Post
    GUI. I want a vm to install win10.
    Hi
    Then ensure Vt is enabled in your bios and install libvirt and virt-manager. Once installed you need to enable and start libvirtd service;

    Code:
    systemctl start libvirtd
    systemctl status libvirtd
    systemctl enable libvirtd
    Then you should be able to fire up virtual machine manager, see qemu running, connect and use the wizard to create the winX VM.
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

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    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    @ultra99
    I recommend you disregard what has been posted in this thread before this one, one of the most important things you must do when installing a major application like virtualization is to do it correctly so that from the beginning you have a solid foundation. Each of the preceding posts is missing something that might allow problems to happen later.

    The first thing to ask, and for you to know is why you want QEMU. Once upon a time many years ago, QEMU was a virtualization technology on its own with unique emulation capabilities but performed relatively slowly. A few years ago though, QEMU was absorbed into KVM and Xen, giving those virtualization technologies extra capabilities and no longer exists on its own.

    So today when your run KVM or Xen, you can run main functionality or you can run the special QEMU functionality within the technology... But unless you have special need for what QEMU might do for you, you are advised <not> to run QEMU and instead run the virtualization technology's main functionality.

    If your objective is to create a Windows guest and your system is running on fairly common hardware, you shouldn't expect any problems running "regular" KVM or Xen.

    Ok,
    With that necessary background out of the way...
    A good rule of thumb before you make any further major changes to your system like installing virtualiztion should be to update your system, you can do so by running the following command
    Code:
    zypper update
    Then,
    The <proper> way to install KVM or Xen on openSUSE is to use the YaST "Install virtualization" module. If you don't see it for some reason, install that module with the following command,
    Code:
    zypper install yast2-vm

    Running that module should install your choice of KVM, Xen or LXC (I recommend KVM), graphical tools to install and manage your Guests, plus offer to create a bridging Networking device(accept the offer). If you don't use the YaST module, most or all of those would have to be selected and installed individually by you.

    Once you have your virtualization completely installed,
    You can proceed to install Guests using the graphical utility virt-install and manage your Guests using the graphical vm-manager.

    Although the following documentation was written for an older version of SLES, except for the installation sections everything else can be used to guide you to using KVM. There is even a section for qemu-kvm if you're still curious about that although you may now decide that wasn't what you really wanted.

    https://www.suse.com/documentation/s.../book_kvm.html

    I also recommend you search this forum for other threads about Windows guests, you may want to install special drivers to improve performance.

    If you have further questions, go ahead and post again...

    HTH,
    TSU
    Beginner Wiki Quickstart - https://en.opensuse.org/User:Tsu2/Quickstart_Wiki
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    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    @ultra99
    I recommend you disregard what has been posted in this thread before this one, one of the most important things you must do when installing a major application like virtualization is to do it correctly so that from the beginning you have a solid foundation. Each of the preceding posts is missing something that might allow problems to happen later.
    Hi
    Good point
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  8. #8

    Default Re: installing qem-kvm in terminal

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    @ultra99
    I recommend you disregard what has been posted in this thread before this one, one of the most important things you must do when installing a major application like virtualization is to do it correctly so that from the beginning you have a solid foundation. Each of the preceding posts is missing something that might allow problems to happen later.

    The first thing to ask, and for you to know is why you want QEMU. Once upon a time many years ago, QEMU was a virtualization technology on its own with unique emulation capabilities but performed relatively slowly. A few years ago though, QEMU was absorbed into KVM and Xen, giving those virtualization technologies extra capabilities and no longer exists on its own.

    So today when your run KVM or Xen, you can run main functionality or you can run the special QEMU functionality within the technology... But unless you have special need for what QEMU might do for you, you are advised <not> to run QEMU and instead run the virtualization technology's main functionality.

    If your objective is to create a Windows guest and your system is running on fairly common hardware, you shouldn't expect any problems running "regular" KVM or Xen.

    Ok,
    With that necessary background out of the way...
    A good rule of thumb before you make any further major changes to your system like installing virtualiztion should be to update your system, you can do so by running the following command
    Code:
    zypper update
    Then,
    The <proper> way to install KVM or Xen on openSUSE is to use the YaST "Install virtualization" module. If you don't see it for some reason, install that module with the following command,
    Code:
    zypper install yast2-vm

    Running that module should install your choice of KVM, Xen or LXC (I recommend KVM), graphical tools to install and manage your Guests, plus offer to create a bridging Networking device(accept the offer). If you don't use the YaST module, most or all of those would have to be selected and installed individually by you.

    Once you have your virtualization completely installed,
    You can proceed to install Guests using the graphical utility virt-install and manage your Guests using the graphical vm-manager.

    Although the following documentation was written for an older version of SLES, except for the installation sections everything else can be used to guide you to using KVM. There is even a section for qemu-kvm if you're still curious about that although you may now decide that wasn't what you really wanted.

    https://www.suse.com/documentation/s.../book_kvm.html

    I also recommend you search this forum for other threads about Windows guests, you may want to install special drivers to improve performance.

    If you have further questions, go ahead and post again...

    HTH,
    TSU
    Thank you for your detailed response, as usual!
    I already installed via terminal and got win10 installed, but resolution/scale is very bad. I want to start over and follow your steps. I need to look into getting proper drivers, if any.
    All I really need from Windows is just mainly MS Office,,,,, and maybe Postgresql since I still I have problems with it in linux, lol.

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