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Thread: Linux study guide

  1. #11
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    Smile Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by deano_ferrari View Post
    Or something friendlier like nano
    Possibly, "nano" makes use of the "Meta" key and, it is more simple …
    I must admit that, "Vi" and "Vim" force quite a lot of finger / brain exercise despite, most commands being a single keystroke -- and, yes, the multiple input modes are at first contact complicated …
    On the other hand, for older people, such as myself, it helps the fight against dementia, Alzheimer's and finger rheumatism …

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by deano_ferrari View Post
    Or something friendlier like nano
    I personally invoke a mix of vim and GUI editor since I have no over-riding preference for either and am willing to use the best tool for the job...
    I've stopped arguing in the Applications forum about the supposed inability to launch GUI apps from the command line, and if I'm already working in a windowed console might sometimes invoke a GUI text editor from the console as follows...
    Code:
    kate filename
    Or, since I'm more likely in an LXQt
    Code:
    leafpad filename
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  3. #13
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by MrNutbutters View Post
    Some examples would be:
    • Understanding and using the command line more
    • Writing scripts and better understanding their power(I've recently gotten a degree in software development so while I haven't actually worked on the sector yet I have a basic understanding of coding)
    Something to whet your appetite -- a "simple" one-liner bash script file's content:
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    #
    # Remove spaces from filenames in the current directory.
    #
    find . -type f -print | while read FileName ; do mv "${FileName}" "${FileName// /_}" ; done
    #

  4. #14

    Default Re: Linux study guide

    On 07/20/2018 11:46 AM, dcurtisfra wrote:
    >
    > Code:
    > --------------------
    >
    > #!/bin/bash
    > #
    > # Remove spaces from filenames in the current directory.
    > #
    > find . -type f -print | while read FileName ; do mv "${FileName}" "${FileName// /_}" ; done
    > #
    >
    > --------------------


    Bleh... underscores are abominable and hyphens should be used instead for
    better readability. <- Religious war started.

    Code:
    find . -type f -print | while read FileName ; do mv "${FileName}"
    "${FileName// /-}" ; done
    Nice sharing!

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  5. #15
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    Or, since I'm more likely in an LXQt
    Code:
    leafpad filename
    Actually, I use Xfce, and I still use kate and kWrite there. If you like the way kate and kWrite highlight code, you can just simply install it in LXQt, make things more pleasant.
    -Gerry Makaro
    Fraser-Bell Info Tech
    Solving Tech Mysteries since the Olden Days!
    ~~
    If I helped you, consider clicking the Star at the bottom left of my post.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by ab View Post
    Bleh... underscores are abominable and hyphens should be used instead for
    better readability.
    Wrong.

    Hyphens are for hyphenating, underscores make for better nobreak readability.

    Religious war started.
    ... former Journalist/Editor is now Engaged.
    -Gerry Makaro
    Fraser-Bell Info Tech
    Solving Tech Mysteries since the Olden Days!
    ~~
    If I helped you, consider clicking the Star at the bottom left of my post.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 21:56:03 +0000, Fraser Bell wrote:

    > ab;2874410 Wrote:
    >> Bleh... underscores are abominable and hyphens should be used instead
    >> for better readability.

    >
    > Wrong.
    >
    > Hyphens are for hyphenating, underscores make for better nobreak
    > readability.
    >
    >> Religious war started.

    >
    > ... former Journalist/Editor is now Engaged.


    /me grabs popcorn



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    openSUSE Forums Administrator
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  8. #18
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    Cool Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by ab View Post
    Bleh... underscores are abominable and hyphens should be used instead for better readability. <- Religious war started.
    No need to war -- I have an extremely large down filled pillow which absorbs and disables all projectiles directed at me … For persistent "warriors" I also have a private black hole which simply causes the things to disappear …

    According to my (old) copy of the Chicago Manual of Style (fourteenth edition), underlining used to be used by editors to indicate that, the compositor shall set that part of the copy in italic. Following this practice, documents written with typewriters used "underscore" to indicate words to be set as italic

    The gentle art of computing uses underscores as word separators. Occasionally one refers to "snake_case", which dates back the late 1960's when the language "B" (a derivative of BCPL) was being defined by Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie; the language "B" became the basis of the language "C" which continued the use of "snake_case" -- see the book written by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie …

    The alternative is to use "CamelCase" (or, "camelCase") which was first appeared in a 1954 conference proceedings; a later "first usage" was presented in a 1965 paper. The programming languages "Lisp" (1958) and "COBOL" (1959) allowed a hyphen to delimit the words of compound identifiers. See also, "Hungarian notation" …

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Quote Originally Posted by dcurtisfra View Post
    No need to war -- I have an extremely large down filled pillow which absorbs and disables all projectiles directed at me … For persistent "warriors" I also have a private black hole which simply causes the things to disappear …

    According to my (old) copy of the Chicago Manual of Style (fourteenth edition), underlining used to be used by editors to indicate that, the compositor shall set that part of the copy in italic. Following this practice, documents written with typewriters used "underscore" to indicate words to be set as italic
    Any of the newspapers I worked at, we Editors used notations by circling the word or phrase with our red pen and adding the notation such as:
    Code:
    Times ulit --
    for upper&lower case italics,
    Code:
    Times bful
    for Bold Face Upper and Lower,
    and would prefix headings with things like:
    Code:
    Futura 36bful - Content of the Headline
    for 36 point Futura Bold-Face Upper and Lower, and subheadings with
    Code:
    Futura 14bfc
    for 14-point Bold-Face Caps.

    ... and so on.

    In typed copy, usually the reporters *did not* add markup, this was usually done by the Editors using the methods above.

    However, senior reporters and columnists were allowed some markup, in which case they would preface italics with <ital> and after with </ital> if doing so as they type. But, they rarely did this. Usually, they would use the above-mentioned methods for any markup they did.

    All typed copy was double-spaced to accommodate such markup, as well as edits.

    LOL

    Now that I have gone way off topic, I will quit.

    Uh, lemme see: Yes. When I am creating a Linux Study Guide, I at first use these conventions.

    (Phewww! Back on topic, then.)
    -Gerry Makaro
    Fraser-Bell Info Tech
    Solving Tech Mysteries since the Olden Days!
    ~~
    If I helped you, consider clicking the Star at the bottom left of my post.

  10. #20

    Default Re: Linux study guide

    Hi,

    It is best to start knowing how to save the shell history from the beginning to avoid asking yourself "what commands did i ran" to do this or that and so on.
    Write some HOWTO's or a FAQ on things that you have done and some TODO/TOFIX list.
    Run your own wiki, there is one in the openSUSE repos or when you got to know vim you can play with the vimwiki
    Learn how to use a version control system for writing program/scripts.


    Good luck on your journey!
    "Unfortunately time is always against us" -- [Morpheus]

    .:https://github.com/Jetchisel:.

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