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Thread: How configure ethernet card to use the full bandwidth ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default How configure ethernet card to use the full bandwidth ?

    Greetings !!

    I just wonder how configure the ethernet adapters from each network interfaces to reach the Gbits of bandwidth, if I look the different utilities to check the input or output bandwidth I got 80Mibs maximum in a local network equipped with Gb hub/switches.
    Is there a way to rise the bandwidth ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How configure ethernet card to use the full bandwidth ?

    Can you please explain what OTHER VERSION you use?
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3

    Default Re: How configure ethernet card to use the full bandwidth ?

    On 04/24/2018 12:36 PM, soundlord wrote:
    >
    > I just wonder how configure the ethernet adapters from each network
    > interfaces to reach the Gbits of bandwidth, if I look the different


    Normally NICs auto-configure to their potential; it would help if you
    showed us your configuration:

    Code:
    ip link
    ip addr
    ip route

    > utilities to check the input or output bandwidth I got 80Mibs maximum in


    Which utilities? Also, are you sure they are reporting 80 Mbps, and not
    80 MBps? The difference is a huge factor (eight (8)) so that matters a
    bit. Using the former, you're slow, but using the latter you are closer
    to the maximum theoretical speed than not.

    > a local network equipped with Gb hub/switches.


    There is no such thing as a gigabit hub, so yes those are either switches
    or else they are nothing.

    > Is there a way to rise the bandwidth ?


    That depends on what you are doing. Just because two utilities claim
    their maximum is 80 MB/s (or Mb/s even on the slow end) does not mean that
    they are measuring the potential. If they use disks to write data
    (foolishly), that means disks could slow you down. If they use
    encryption, that could slow things down. If they use plain old TCP
    sockets, but they somehow limit the MTU to something smaller than the
    maximum allowed by hardware, that could slow you down. If your switches
    or other hardware are not optimized, that too. If you are going over too
    many hops (switch, then router, then another switch), any of those, or the
    combination of them, could slow you down.

    --
    Good luck.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How configure ethernet card to use the full bandwidth ?

    Probably the most common setting to be checked is that your NIC is set to full duplex and not half duplex.
    Probably the next most common thing to check is the quality of your patch cables and connections.

    After those,
    There are a great many things you might check, many depending on whether anyone else maintains the network besides yourself. If your network is supported by a staff of IT, then you might be able to assume that your network was architected properly and the equipment is correct. If you're on your own or you suspect the network might not have been built by knowledgeable people, then you might have to check everything including hardware, connections, traffic, more.

    One additional thing you can do if you are on a gigabit ethernet network...
    By default, almost all Linux distros are set up by default to support low end machines on fast ethrnet, much slower than gigabit.
    For faster networks, and if your conditions might also not be ideal, you can modify the size of your system's TCP/IP buffers, and enlarge your Layer 3 TCP/IP sliding windows by changing your TCP/IP Congestion Control algorithm. Although I wrote the following article for a much earlier version of openSUSE, AFAIK everything in the write-up is still completely applicable to all current versions of openSUSE

    https://sites.google.com/site/4techs...ork-connection

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