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Thread: LAMP on SUSE

  1. #11
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    Default Re: LAMP on SUSE

    I must say, I agree with that.

    And I do not need any against with new technologies, but why we do not have multiple solutions.

    However, if most people do not want use what I say it is ok for me. In that case I thinking in wrong way, and I really appreciate it

  2. #12
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    Default Re: LAMP on SUSE

    On Thu, 15 Feb 2018 09:16:01 +0000, Motokultivator wrote:

    > And I do not need any against with new technologies, but why we do not
    > have multiple solutions.


    The beauty of the open source community is that anyone who wants to
    create a solution and share it can - people often do this to 'itch a
    scratch' they have.

    So if you have a different way to do it, committing it to the build
    service and making it available to others is absolutely encouraged.

    Jim

    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Administrator
    Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

  3. #13
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    Default Re: LAMP on SUSE

    Quote Originally Posted by Motokultivator View Post
    As I can see from you posts, you are not developers

    I agree and disagree in same time with you. If you know what is the brew and how it works you will know about what I speak. I have idea to make it much more easies for end developers than brew.

    Brew is originally made for MacOS and later is ported for Linux, but many thinks does not work very well and it is really complex system. No one developer need something like brew (compiling every time what we need on the system). Everyone want something with just few commands or mouse click. We as a linux experienced users and developers have a chance to help many people all around the world if we want of course.

    With containers and virtualization everything is easiest (mostly) after you once set environment, but for that MUST HAVE really strong machine to handle all over it on first place and configure every virtual machine from scratch (for web developer other distributions are easies configurable than suse, but I speak about suse here). For example, currently I used some web applications for development where I need minimum 8GB RAM for run. If I will move it to the virtual machine what I will get? Nothing! How I will coding there. I as a developer must know how to share web directory with host machine and so on, and so on. Many developers are not linux expert, but want to use linux!

    With just few scripts and adapt RPM files we will solve all issue with that. That is very easy to make it. Question is do we want to help or not to ourselfs and whole current and feature (absolutely beginners) linux users.

    Stop thinking as linux expert, try to think as absolutely beginners who want to use linux and develop on it.
    Although Jim already countered, I'm also throwing in my 2 cents (or farthings, bitcoin or whatever)

    Regarding how "beefy" the machine has to be to support virtualization as a development tool,

    Actually hardly any effect.
    Typically, you should only be running as many machines simultaneously as needed for your immediate use. That might typically be only one, two or three approximately depending on what you're building. And, if you're building a typical client/server web solution, you should probably need to support only a single client. And, depending on what you're building you might even take this a step further deploying a script-based web server like nginx or a javascript webserver which processes web requests and session state very differently than a more resource-hungry apache webserver and/or MySQL/MariaDB.

    So, on an 8GB machine you should be able to run 2 virtual machines comfortably for Web development while still for instance using the HostOS machine as a generic client without any special alteration. I can remember only one project where I needed an enormous amount of RAM and that wasn't a web solution being built (or rather a web interface was only a very tiny part of the solution), it was an early test parsing data analysis engine which required about 1.5 Gigabytes of Eclipse plugins to just be set up. Even today, similar solutions are now built over a distributed architecture and typically don't require such a complex and enormous backend.

    So, for instance whereas you'd never consider running a Production LAMP on 2GB of allocated RAM, I do that all the time for Web development, with either a MinimalX/IceWM, XFCE or LXQt Desktop. Anything virtualized can be adjusted higher as needed later.

    As for using Brew,
    You can make any Development decisions you wish, but personally I don't know anyone who uses Brew for project and workflow management... Instead, typically I see people do one of the following

    1. Use an IDE
    2. Write management code using whatever code they're already using
    3. Particularly for web projects that use community frameworks, workflow and build management apps like Gulp and Grunt

    The third option above is very popular because it supports what I opined many years ago that "JavaScript is the language that will rule the world." It's already probably <the> major web coding language as part of the HTML5/CSS/JavaScript architecture, and if you use these tools your entire build environment is portable to any platform (other distros, Windows, Mac, more) and there is a good chance your entire setup will run without installing anything new (compare to whether others will already have Brew installed)

    Not thinking as a Linux user, in this case thinking purely in terms of Website Development,

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  4. #14

    Default Re: LAMP on SUSE

    Thanks I got mine working though there's a lot of scrubbing / trial & error but at the end it was a good learning

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