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Thread: Number of threads to the roof

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    543

    Default Number of threads to the roof

    Normally a user can have around 1200 threads running.
    Code:
    djviking@machine:~> ulimit -a
    core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority             (-e) 0
    file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals                 (-i) 128285
    max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files                      (-n) 1024
    pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority              (-r) 0
    stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes              (-u) 1200
    virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks                      (-x) unlimited
    
    One should think this is enough.
    I started to get problem starting applications, because the number of threads running on my system has gone to the roof.
    Still after closing all my applications, there are roughly over 700 threads active.
    Starting Vivaldi increases the number of threads to around 1000, Starting Chromium increase to 1200 threads.

    I could increase the max user processes to 1850 (the same amount that root gets). I have done this on my work computer, but it seems like a workaround. Instead I would really like to address why there are so many threads, when I have no applications running.
    Code:
    top - 21:04:03 up 23 days, 22:41,  9 users,  load average: 1,53, 1,71, 1,70
    Threads: 1208 total,   1 running, 1205 sleeping,   0 stopped,   2 zombie
    %Cpu(s):  3,2 us,  1,6 sy,  0,0 ni, 95,2 id,  0,0 wa,  0,0 hi,  0,0 si,  0,0 st
    KiB Mem:  32863936 total, 24904764 used,  7959172 free,   607484 buffers
    KiB Swap:        0 total,        0 used,        0 free. 15635464 cached Mem
    

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    1,669

    Default Re: Number of threads to the roof

    Hi, looking at my fairly standard 42.2 here I see very different numbers. With only "top" in a terminal I see:
    Code:
    top - 21:18:59 up 39 min,  2 users,  load average: 0.14, 0.27, 0.33
    Threads: 412 total,   1 running, 411 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
    %Cpu(s):  0.0 us,  0.0 sy,  0.0 ni,100.0 id,  0.0 wa,  0.0 hi,  0.0 si,  0.0 st
    KiB Mem:  16317888 total,  2769448 used, 13548440 free,   110220 buffers
    KiB Swap: 16777212 total,        0 used, 16777212 free.  2019108 cached Mem
    and max user processes is 4096 here for a normal user (never touched that), while I confirm 1850 for root:
    Code:
    bruno@LT_B:~> ulimit -a
    core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority             (-e) 0
    file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals                 (-i) 63490
    max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files                      (-n) 1024
    pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority              (-r) 0
    stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes              (-u) 4096
    virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks                      (-x) unlimited
    bruno@LT_B:~>
    Anything running "behind the scenes" in your system?
    Main: Leap 15 Gnome on i7 4720HQ + Geforce GTX960M
    Test: Leap 42.3 (& others) on Core2Duo + GM965

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    543

    Default Re: Number of threads to the roof

    I completely forgot about this post...


    Quote Originally Posted by OrsoBruno View Post
    Hi, looking at my fairly standard 42.2 here I see very different numbers. With only "top" in a terminal I see:
    Code:
    top - 21:18:59 up 39 min,  2 users,  load average: 0.14, 0.27, 0.33
    Threads: 412 total,   1 running, 411 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
    %Cpu(s):  0.0 us,  0.0 sy,  0.0 ni,100.0 id,  0.0 wa,  0.0 hi,  0.0 si,  0.0 st
    KiB Mem:  16317888 total,  2769448 used, 13548440 free,   110220 buffers
    KiB Swap: 16777212 total,        0 used, 16777212 free.  2019108 cached Mem
    and max user processes is 4096 here for a normal user (never touched that), while I confirm 1850 for root:
    Code:
    bruno@LT_B:~> ulimit -a
    core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority             (-e) 0
    file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals                 (-i) 63490
    max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files                      (-n) 1024
    pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority              (-r) 0
    stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes              (-u) 4096
    virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks                      (-x) unlimited
    bruno@LT_B:~>
    Anything running "behind the scenes" in your system?
    I have done nothing fancy. The installation is not a fresh Leap 42.2, but an upgrade from 13.2

    I think I will try to increase the max user processes to 4096, but would still like to find out why the thread count is so high.

    The high thread count is seen when no desktop applications are running.
    I am normally running
    Vivaldi 30+ tabs
    Chromium 8+ tabs (streaming)
    Steam
    DVD Profiler (Wine)
    Services: sshd

    I haven't rebooted the machine in over a month. Will try running an upgrade and then restart to see what the thread count is right after startup.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    543

    Default Re: Number of threads to the roof

    After an upgrade and reboot, I have 334 threads running and no desktop applications.
    Just opening Vivaldi spiked to 778 threads, but there are only 23 processes for vivaldi.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    1,669

    Default Re: Number of threads to the roof

    Quote Originally Posted by DJViking View Post
    After an upgrade and reboot, I have 334 threads running and no desktop applications.
    Just opening Vivaldi spiked to 778 threads, but there are only 23 processes for vivaldi.
    Opening Firefox with 27 tabs adds some 100 threads here (say 408 -> 512 or so). Don't know if Vivaldi might be so much "multi-threaded"...
    Main: Leap 15 Gnome on i7 4720HQ + Geforce GTX960M
    Test: Leap 42.3 (& others) on Core2Duo + GM965

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    543

    Default Re: Number of threads to the roof

    After running an upgrade of my Leap 42.2 the max user processes increased from 1200 to 4096
    Code:
    djviking@lbox:~> ulimit -a
    core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority             (-e) 0
    file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals                 (-i) 128285
    max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files                      (-n) 1024
    pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority              (-r) 0
    stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes              (-u) 4096
    virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks                      (-x) unlimited
    

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