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Thread: Purpose of Gnome Software in Opensuse Tumbleweed

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  1. #1

    Default Purpose of Gnome Software in Opensuse Tumbleweed

    Hi,

    I am new to Opensuse. I installed Tumbleweed on my system with the Gnome DE. I would like if someone can clarify the purpose of the Gnome Software. When I open it, I only see applications I already have installed and cannot find other applications to install. I know you can install applications using Yast, but why include Gnome-Software if it doesn't have any purpose, as far as I can tell.

    Also if it serves no purpose, can I uninstall it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    Johannesburg, South Africa
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    Default Re: Purpose of Gnome Software in Opensuse Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Micahj View Post
    Hi,

    I am new to Opensuse. I installed Tumbleweed on my system with the Gnome DE. I would like if someone can clarify the purpose of the Gnome Software. When I open it, I only see applications I already have installed and cannot find other applications to install. I know you can install applications using Yast, but why include Gnome-Software if it doesn't have any purpose, as far as I can tell.

    Also if it serves no purpose, can I uninstall it.
    I think that's the case for all flavours of opensuse. It provides you with an alternative way of installing software. This is actually quite common. Even in Fedora or the *buntus you may have a package manager and a software centre. My guess is its not worth it nor desirable to remove the software centre. It is probably tightly integrated into the desktop environment. So removing it will not really lead to a better system. I found that some packages install better with one vs the other method. Having a few alternatives comes in handy.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Purpose of Gnome Software in Opensuse Tumbleweed

    Quote Originally Posted by simonsaysthis View Post
    I think that's the case for all flavours of opensuse. It provides you with an alternative way of installing software. This is actually quite common. Even in Fedora or the *buntus you may have a package manager and a software centre. My guess is its not worth it nor desirable to remove the software centre. It is probably tightly integrated into the desktop environment. So removing it will not really lead to a better system. I found that some packages install better with one vs the other method. Having a few alternatives comes in handy.
    Ok cool, thanks for the reply.

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