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Thread: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

  1. #1
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    Question Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    Hi everybody,
    I search for a right way to booting openSUSE from the FAT32 USB flash memory.
    I did the steps of THIS LINK to use Grub4DOS but still my openSUSE could not boot correctly.
    How can I boot THIS LIVE OPENSUSE by FAT32 Flash USB memory?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    There's a command (really, a script) called "live-fat-stick". It's in the 42.3 repos. It is probably in the Tumbleweed repos. Or you can find it with a google search.

    That script will do what is needed for booting a live iso from a FAT32 flash drive.
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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    I always use SUSE Studio ImageWriter
    loyalty returns to those who practice it

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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    Quote Originally Posted by V_idocq View Post
    I always use SUSE Studio ImageWriter
    Well, Is that compatible with FAT32 flash USB memstick and write ISO on it?

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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    You can use ImageWriter to write an iso to a memory stick. But it will no longer be FAT32 if you do that. You could, of course, reformat it back to FAT32 once you are finished with its use for booting the live system.
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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    It writes the iso direct to the stick not to the FAT partition. Any partition is lost but the stick is then bootable to the installer

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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    loyalty returns to those who practice it

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    Thumbs up Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    At the Conclusion, I'm going to test my ISO by "live-fat-stick".
    Welcome to any other helpful suggestions.

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    Exclamation Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    I tried with "live-fat-stick" on my Flash Memory (8GB-Fat32) but I get these Errors! How can I resolve that?

    root@slinux:~/live-fat-stick# ./live-fat-stick /home/user/Images/openSUSE/Live/openSUSE-Tumbleweed-GNOME-Live-x86_64-Snapshot20170928-Media.iso /dev/sdcPlease make sure the following information is correct:
    iso name: openSUSE-Tumbleweed-GNOME-Live-x86_64-Snapshot20170928-Media.iso distro: suse stick device: /dev/sdc
    stick uuid: /dev/disk/by-uuid/2017-04-01-11-29-57-00 stick partition:
    continue ? [y/n]? y
    copying openSUSE-Tumbleweed-GNOME-Live-x86_64-Snapshot20170928-Media.iso to usb stick
    dd_rescue: (info): Using softbs=4096.0kiB, hardbs=4.0kiB
    dd_rescue: (fatal): open "/tmp/tmp.0BPHICNtkg/openSUSE-Tumbleweed-GNOME-Live-x86_64-Snapshot20170928-Media.iso" failed: Read-only file system
    stat: cannot stat ‘/tmp/tmp.0BPHICNtkg/openSUSE-Tumbleweed-GNOME-Live-x86_64-Snapshot20170928-Media.iso’: No such file or directory
    Source and destination image does not match
    root@slinux:~/live-fat-stick#

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    Default Re: Boot openSUSE from FAT32 USB flash memory

    Quote Originally Posted by mbzadegan View Post
    At the Conclusion, I'm going to test my ISO by "live-fat-stick".
    Welcome to any other helpful suggestions.
    I am still not sure that you understand what is what in mass-storage > partition > file system land.
    The advices above are correct in themselves, but IMHO when you have misunderstandings about what you are doing (or try to, or want to), then confusion may be great.

    The term "FAT32 USB flash memory" is a confusing mix about identifying hardware, partitioning and file system.

    The USB flash memory is about hardware: a specific type of mass-dtorage, connected through a specific type of bus to the system.

    The FAT32 part is defines a file system.

    What you most probably have is a mass-storage device with a partition table (that is on the first block of the device) that defines only one partition. That partition is then occupied by a file system of type FAT32.

    What you seem to want is a mass-storage device where you can boot openSUSE from. For this it is very unimportant what is now on the device (a partition table, and a partition with a FAT32 file system), because they will all be replaced by the ISO file that you must copy to it. Thus afterwards, there is no partition table, and thus no partition and thus no FAT32 file system anymore. And if these things existed some time in the earlier history of the device is completely uninteresting. There could have been a partition table with two partitions and one partition could have an NTFS file system and the other an ext2 one. I have no idea what you would have called such an USB stick, but from the viewpoint of putting a bootable ISO on it, it is again uninteresting and of no influence on your question.

    Maybe this might be of interest: https://en.opensuse.org/SDB%3ABasics...,_mount_points
    Henk van Velden

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