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Thread: running out of disk space on /root directory

  1. #1

    Default running out of disk space on /root directory

    Hello,

    I have the follwoing partitions:

    Code:
    Dateisystem     1K-Blöcke    Benutzt  Verfügbar Verw% Eingehängt auf
    devtmpfs          5983532          8    5983524    1% /dev
    tmpfs             5991012        668    5990344    1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs             5991012      10488    5980524    1% /run
    tmpfs             5991012          0    5991012    0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    /dev/sda2        20510716   19569728          0  100% /
    /dev/sda3      1900014844 1187900380  615576200   66% /home
    tmpfs             1198204         28    1198176    1% /run/user/1000
    /dev/sdb1      1953480700  187731216 1765749484   10% /run/media/vasilis/My Passport

    as you can see, the root directory is now 100%, but at the same time, I have more than 500 GB available. How does this work? How can I provide more space to the root directory?

    Best,
    Vasilis

  2. #2
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    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    That file system is Btrfs?

    BTW, that is the root file system, which is written as /.
    /root is something different.
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3

    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    Code:
    sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,relatime)
    proc on /proc type proc (rw,relatime)
    devtmpfs on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,nosuid,size=5983532k,nr_inodes=1495883,mode=755)
    securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
    tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev)
    devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000)
    tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,mode=755)
    tmpfs on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (ro,nosuid,nodev,noexec,mode=755)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,xattr,release_agent=/usr/lib/systemd/systemd-cgroups-agent,name=systemd)
    pstore on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/net_cls,net_prio type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,net_cls,net_prio)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu,cpuacct type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,cpu,cpuacct)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/hugetlb type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,hugetlb)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/cpuset type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,cpuset)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/freezer type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,freezer)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/pids type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,pids)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/devices type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,devices)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/blkio type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,blkio)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/perf_event type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,perf_event)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/memory type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,memory)
    /dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    systemd-1 on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type autofs (rw,relatime,fd=26,pgrp=1,timeout=0,minproto=5,maxproto=5,direct)
    debugfs on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw,relatime)
    hugetlbfs on /dev/hugepages type hugetlbfs (rw,relatime)
    mqueue on /dev/mqueue type mqueue (rw,relatime)
    /dev/sda3 on /home type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    tmpfs on /run/user/1000 type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=1198204k,mode=700,uid=1000,gid=100)
    fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw,relatime)
    gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/1000/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=100)
    tracefs on /sys/kernel/debug/tracing type tracefs (rw,relatime)
    /dev/sdb1 on /run/media/vasilis/My Passport type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,default_permissions,allow_other,blksize=4096,uhelper=udisks2)
    what is all this??? i guess it is not Btrfs.
    so, i presume the root file system is where all the essential stuff goes for linux to run? how could i add more space to that?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    It is better to not only show output, but also the command you used. Thus we can see what the output in fact is about. The best is to copy/paste: prompt, command, output, next prompt. Then we know who you were, where you were, what you did and what you got. In short, we see what you see and that is what you and we want.

    My post yesterday was a bit premature. The df shows that / is 100%. On a 20GB file system, that is not normal.
    First try to empty /tmp to get some space to use the system.

    Sorry, I have to go for the day, but others will be able to help you to investigatte if some log file in /var/log run out of proportions.
    Henk van Velden

  5. #5
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    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    /dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)

    Your root partition uses ext4 on /dev/sda2
    Since /home is on /dev/sda3 and I am guessing there is no space left between the two you would have to move partitions to get space to expand the root partition. Show fdisk -l for further help

  6. #6
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    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    /dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)

    Your root partition uses ext4 on /dev/sda2
    Since /home is on /dev/sda3 and I am guessing there is no space left between the two you would have to move partitions to get space to expand the root partition. Show fdisk -l for further help
    Shoudn't we first try to find out why his / is 100% before we start to go into the intricate process of reshuffling partitions?

    20GB full is not normal. There must be something there that can be deleted.
    Henk van Velden

  7. #7

    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    Here is output from fdisk -l. I agree with the latest reply that first I would like to find out why this 20 GB which was suggested on the first instance by a Linux installation is not sufficient anymore.

    Code:
    linux-yrfz:/ # fdisk -l                                                                                               
    Festplatte /dev/sda: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 Bytes, 3907029168 Sektoren                                                
    Einheiten: Sektoren von 1 * 512 = 512 Bytes                                                                           
    Sektorgröße (logisch/physikalisch): 512 Bytes / 4096 Bytes                                                            
    E/A-Größe (minimal/optimal): 4096 Bytes / 4096 Bytes                                                                  
    Festplattenbezeichnungstyp: dos                                                                                       
    Festplattenbezeichner: 0x0000c0d9                                                                                     
                                                                                                                          
    Gerät      Boot   Anfang       Ende   Sektoren Größe Kn Typ                                                           
    /dev/sda1           2048    4208639    4206592    2G 82 Linux Swap / Solaris                                          
    /dev/sda2  *     4208640   46153727   41945088   20G 83 Linux                                                         
    /dev/sda3       46153728 3907028991 3860875264  1.8T 83 Linux                                                         
                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                          
    linux-yrfz:/ #


    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    Shoudn't we first try to find out why his / is 100% before we start to go into the intricate process of reshuffling partitions?

    20GB full is not normal. There must be something there that can be deleted.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    I suggested to empty /tmp. Did you do that?
    Henk van Velden

  9. #9

    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    I suggested to empty /tmp. Did you do that?
    I have deleted some files, I now have 1,3 GB free. I am not able to delete more, as the operation is not allowed.

  10. #10

    Default Re: running out of disk space on /root directory

    I had 20Gb / partition and it filled up as well when I had Leap42.2 (formatted in ext4 as well). I deleted from the tmp directory all files/folders older than 30 days with the command (as root)
    Code:
    find /tmp -ctime +30 -exec rm -rf {} +
    and then increased the size to 40GB. Now after the update to 42.3 I have 14GB used there. It seems that the /tmp directory fills up even though not as fast as when using btrfs file system.
    You should make a backup of you /home directory and then boot from a "Gparted" or "Parted Magic" CD. I used a parted magic CD from 2013 (it was still free then). Then you should shrink your /home partition (take 20GB from the front adjacent to the root partition). It will move all you files in /home backwards and if everything goes OK your files are all OK - no guarantee though that's why I wrote back up. Then you can increase your root partition by those 20GB. You can just play round until you have got it as you want it - the partitioning is only done after you activate those steps.
    Cheers
    Uli

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