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Thread: Bye bye Leap

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    On Sun, 06 Aug 2017 13:16:01 +0000, spoovy wrote:

    > I don't see how I am 'flouncing' by simply recounting my experience. Yes
    > I could have asked for more help on forums and I used to do this a lot
    > years ago while learning about Linux, but these days I generally can't
    > be bothered. The main reason I gravitated away from 'bleeding edge'
    > distros to the more stable ones was because I didn't want to be
    > dependant on the availability, knowledge and guesswork of strangers just
    > to reliably get basic things done. That seemed a reasonable expectation
    > from Leap -- an OS that is marketed as highly stable by virtue of it's
    > closeness to it's enterprise OS relative. If I'd had these issues with
    > Tumbleweed then I would not have created this thread.


    Thanks for coming back and explaining more thoroughly.

    A Linux distribution is built with a community - and issues that some
    people have aren't experienced by everyone. I certainly find Leap to be
    very stable, but I also understand that some people have issues.

    The only way to get these issues uncovered and dealt with is to report
    them - how is it reasonable for anyone to assume that issues that are
    unreported will be addressed?

    Jim

    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Administrator
    Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    The definition of what is stable in Linux has changed radically over the last 10 years, and by necessity because of the massive wave of recent changes.

    For the person who just wants something that works and doesn't want to invest effort into new things has to determine for himself what changes he can tolerate. If CentOS is all he can deal with, then so be it... Recognize that and stick to what makes you happy but be aware <no other distro> goes to that extreme.

    But, if you're installing on newer (and better) hardware or chasing better performance or efficiency... And particularly if you're installing on Consumer grade hardware which will incorporate new technology faster than Server hardware...

    Then that CentOS philosophy to deny change as long as possible becomes a drag and sometimes an obstacle. What you describe becomes reversed and swing the other way when you'd likely experience <less> problems using almost anything other than CentOS.

    LEAP and its SUSE core strikes a pretty good middle ground for new technology and reliability.
    Unlike CentOS, primarily because of our support policy for accepting new kernels and software updates as soon as possible, we enjoy many benefits CentOS Users have to learn to live without. We have unique features and tools which have been developed over many, many years that work while other distros don't support. And, nowadays, we probably support more variety and choice than any other distro while others are actually deprecating choices.

    So,
    It's hard to say what your (@OP) issues might be but I'd like to think that if you were to expend the effort to fix those issues the result would have a major long term beneficial Experience.

    IMO,
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  3. #13
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    I've installed Leap on several PCs. Most were very stable immediately after install and remained that way. The other two were bleading edge tech. and very hard to configure, however once I got them working, with help from the folks on this forum, they both became very stable, requiring no attention.

    So is Leap "Stable"? IMHO the answer is an emphatic "Yes", however that's not to say that all those PC's were "Stable out of the box". Two different issues for sure.
    MS user 1988-2008, Linux user 1998-present, openSUSE user since 2004
    (The first computer I used had a punch card reader)

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    For the person who just wants something that works and doesn't want to invest effort into new things has to determine for himself what changes he can tolerate. If CentOS is all he can deal with, then so be it... .
    I would not be the only woman in the world who uses Linux. It's offensive & upsetting to keep reading such male-centric alienation in online technical fora & blogs etc. Every time i encounter it i call it out. Online spaces [indeed, the world] should be gender-neutral / diversity-respectful, not exclusionary of 52% of the populace. IMO.

  5. #15

    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    Just here to say I am new to opensuse ( convert from fedora ) and immediately from the start everything just worked. I'm digging Opensuse KDE plasma, and impressed with YaST2

  6. #16
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    Lightbulb Re: Bye bye Leap

    Quote Originally Posted by GooeyGirl View Post
    I would not be the only woman in the world who uses Linux. It's offensive & upsetting to keep reading such male-centric alienation in online technical fora & blogs etc. Every time i encounter it i call it out. Online spaces [indeed, the world] should be gender-neutral / diversity-respectful, not exclusionary of 52% of the populace. IMO.
    You're indeed not the only woman in the Linux, or indeed, in the computing world. My list of (famous) ladies to be noticed:

    There's a couple of somewhat older (than Grace) ladies who were involved in programming the first US American computers around 1944 -- I don't have the historical reference at hand . . .

    In addition, I could list the lady colleagues I've worked with over the years but, I do not have permission to publish their names . . .

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    Quote Originally Posted by GooeyGirl View Post
    I would not be the only woman in the world who uses Linux. It's offensive & upsetting to keep reading such male-centric alienation in online technical fora & blogs etc. Every time i encounter it i call it out. Online spaces [indeed, the world] should be gender-neutral / diversity-respectful, not exclusionary of 52% of the populace. IMO.
    The industry may be male-centric (well, most Linux desktop/laptop users seem to be male), but I'm pretty sure that's not the reason for tsu's use of 'he' or 'himself.' That's just the traditional, generic way of referring to someone as an example in the English language, much like John Doe or Joe Bloggs are used as placeholder names. As a male, should I be offended and upset that people refer to ships and countries by the use of a female pronoun? I find it somewhat quaint, but it doesn't affect me.

    Another iteration of the "men are generic, women are special" trope I guess!
    "None are more enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free." -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (Elective Affinities, 1809)

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    Quote Originally Posted by dcurtisfra View Post
    You're indeed not the only woman in the Linux, or indeed, in the computing world. My list of (famous) ladies to be noticed:

    There's a couple of somewhat older (than Grace) ladies who were involved in programming the first US American computers around 1944 -- I don't have the historical reference at hand . . .

    In addition, I could list the lady colleagues I've worked with over the years but, I do not have permission to publish their names . . .
    Can't believe Joanna Rutkowska (creator of Qubes OS) didn't make your list
    "None are more enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free." -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (Elective Affinities, 1809)

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    On Tue, 08 Aug 2017 19:36:01 +0000, ominus wrote:

    > GooeyGirl;2833218 Wrote:
    >> I would not be the only woman in the world who uses Linux. It's
    >> offensive & upsetting to keep reading such male-centric alienation in
    >> online technical fora & blogs etc. Every time i encounter it i call it
    >> out. Online spaces [indeed, the world] should be gender-neutral /
    >> diversity-respectful, not exclusionary of 52% of the populace. IMO.

    >
    > The industry may be male-centric (well, most Linux desktop/laptop users
    > seem to be male), but I'm pretty sure that's not the reason for tsu's
    > use of *'he'* or *'himself.'* That's just the traditional, generic way
    > of referring to someone as an example in the English language, much like
    > John Doe or Joe Bloggs are used as placeholder names. As a male, should
    > I be offended and upset that people refer to ships and countries by the
    > use of a female pronoun? I find it somewhat quaint, but it doesn't
    > affect me.
    >
    > Another iteration of the "men are generic, women are special" trope I
    > guess!


    I think it's fair to say that GooeyGirl is familiar with standard English
    language usage (I recall that she's a native speaker/writer) - so let's
    just leave this here as a lesson learned for everyone.

    Jim
    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Administrator
    Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

  10. #20

    Default Re: Bye bye Leap

    As easy as they (all distros in general) have made Linux to install and run, sometimes it still takes a guru to get it installed, or find a corner case run-time root cause. But if another distro "just works" for your hardware, honestly that's probably the easiest and best route. Not because openSUSE sucks, more like because no Linux distro seems to have all hardware combinations well covered. Honestly openSUSE + KDE is one of the best imho, as I tried several distros after Mandrake/Mandriva went kaboom. Though I do change BTRFS to EXT4 on installation as a matter of policy.

    btw, Mandrake had a VERY bad habit of last hour changes between the final RC and the golden release ISO, and basically broke something major in every release. I haven't seen anything on that level around here so far.

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