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Thread: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

  1. #1

    Default Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    Is there a way to do so?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    There are different definitions for a "cloned MAC address."
    In any case, are you running Network Manager, and if so have you tried manually setting your MAC address?

    TSU
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    There are different definitions for a "cloned MAC address."
    In any case, are you running Network Manager, and if so have you tried manually setting your MAC address?
    TSU
    Thanks for replying TSU,

    In Yast Control Center, network services are written in Chinese (too many options). Where do I go to set a new MAC Address? Cloned MAC Address refers to the fact of changing the original one by one that exist. Otherwise, it won't work. For that, I have an app in Win that gives an exhaustive list of existing ones.

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    Default Re: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    1. Since time immemorial, it has always been possible to edit directly the network interface files. In openSUSE, you'll find them in the following directory
    Code:
    /etc/sysconfig/network
    2. You can switch from Wicked(using YaST to configure your network settings) to Network Manager. You can make this switch by opening
    YaST > System > Network Settings > Global Options tab

    Once you've switched to using Network Manager, on most openSUSE Desktops, the second network icon in far right of your panel/taskbar should now be active.

    Click on that second network icon, "Edit Connections" (On most systems there will be a single working connection by default), and the default tab will display a "Clone MAC Address" field.

    For either of the above methods, if you see something different and can't figure out what to do, post again.

    TSU

    BTW - This is really a Networking configuration and less some kind of Application topic...
    And, accordingly you'll probably find this topic asked and answered in that Forum several times...
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    Quote Originally Posted by tsu2 View Post
    1. Since time immemorial, it has always been possible to edit directly the network interface files. In openSUSE, you'll find them in the following directory
    Code:
    /etc/sysconfig/network
    I don't get this first one?


    Gnome does not record change(s) at all. It is always reset to Hardware Address, the UI is always showing the same MAC Address. Deleting the default profile and redo another one gives the same result. At least I recover the network switch so that it does not connect automatically on boot up. The only good news!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cloned MAC Address in Gnome Desktop: No Option

    Quote Originally Posted by AMD17 View Post
    I don't get this first one?


    Gnome does not record change(s) at all. It is always reset to Hardware Address, the UI is always showing the same MAC Address. Deleting the default profile and redo another one gives the same result. At least I recover the network switch so that it does not connect automatically on boot up. The only good news!
    What I'm describing is how Linux itself functions, and is not part of any Desktop... So applies no matter whether you're running Gnome or anything else. In fact, if you edit the interface file, it should over-ride any settings made at the Desktop level.

    List the contents of that directory, you will find a number of files including files with names like "ifcfg-foo"
    If for instance you see a file "ifcofg=eth0" that will be the interface configuration file for the interface named "eth0"
    For whatever network interface you wish to modify, open it in a text editor

    By default, interface files only contain a set of default options which are set, most often including things like whether configured as a DHCP client, a static address, whether it's active on boot, etc. but hardly ever the MAC address... It's an option you have to create. For the full list of options you can set in these interface files, you can either view a MAN page or read online documenation like the following(Interface files are generally the same no matter what distro. In some distros there is also a "master" interface file but not in openSUSE)
    https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US...nterfaces.html

    In the above, you'll find the MAC address option you can add to the interface file
    Code:
    MACADDR=MAC-address
    HTH,
    TSU
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